Author Topic: Adjust finished dough temperature before cold fermentation?  (Read 994 times)

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Offline bfguilford

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Adjust finished dough temperature before cold fermentation?
« on: February 19, 2013, 10:38:33 AM »
I keep my house at 62-65 degrees during the days in winter. My flour is stored in an area that is a pretty constant 60-62 degrees. With my Bosch Compact, and using water straight out of the water filter, I usually end up with a finished dough temperature of around 65 degrees. Depending on which NY dough recipe I'm using, I usually cold ferment for around 3 days (Fazzari) to 7 days (Glutenboy). I've read that the target finished temperature before refrigerating the dough is closer to 80 degrees. I'm getting a pretty tender dough with good crumb structure and rise in the cornicione at 65 degrees.

When I did my Fazzari dough, I left it in bulk at 65 degrees after mixing for an hour (unscientific, I know).

Questions: How critical is the finished dough temperature in a home setting for 2 dough balls after a bulk ferment (around 950 grams in total)? Should I warm my water to compensate for the lower temperature?

Barry
« Last Edit: February 19, 2013, 10:44:28 AM by bfguilford »
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Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Re: Adjust finished dough temperature before cold fermentation?
« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2013, 11:56:35 AM »
Barry;
Yes, I would recommend increasing the water temperature slightly to give you a warmed finished dough. For use in a home setting where refrigeration is not so great, I would suggest a finished dough temperature of about 75F.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline bfguilford

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Re: Adjust finished dough temperature before cold fermentation?
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2013, 03:57:04 PM »
Thanks for the quick response, Tom. I'll do that.

Barry
Light travels faster than sound. That's why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.


 

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