Author Topic: Costing ingredients  (Read 1947 times)

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Offline hotsawce

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Costing ingredients
« on: February 20, 2013, 01:42:28 PM »
I know prices of ingredients vary by location, but is anyone aware of a good online resource where I can get business to business prices for things like caputo flour, tomatoes, fresh tomatoes etc etc. I'm going to begin running numbers and I'd like to make them as accurate as possible. Looking for ballpark figures... Just a place to start


Offline thezaman

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Re: Costing ingredients
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2013, 10:52:10 AM »
 where are you located? the specialty goods such as caputo will probably have to come from a pizza supplier. caputo is a lot easier to get today than a few years back. if they carry caputo they will probably have a imported tomato. i know you want to do curd that will also have to come from a pizza specific supplier.if they carry grande then they can get you curd.
« Last Edit: February 21, 2013, 10:56:40 AM by thezaman »

Offline pizzablogger

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Re: Costing ingredients
« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2013, 12:59:35 PM »
I know prices of ingredients vary by location, but is anyone aware of a good on-line resource where I can get business to business prices for things like caputo flour, tomatoes, fresh tomatoes etc etc. I'm going to begin running numbers and I'd like to make them as accurate as possible. Looking for ballpark figures... Just a place to start

Most wholesalers do not make their pricing list publically available.  You have to have an account set-up with them to view the pricing. Dittos for an outfit like Restaurant Depot.

They may make their product list public, but not the pricing. And keep in mind the pricing on a single item may vary depending on the quantity of the item you project you will need during a year.

Just here in Baltimore, the price of a 55# bag of Caputo 00 Pizzeria flour ranges from $31 to $35 per bag, depending on the wholesaler you get it from (there are a few that offer it here). That's a 13% disparity, which is significant.  So you could use something like $34 per bag to err on the conservative side for now.

Tomato pricing is an even wider price disparity, depending on which product you use. Alta Cucina's down here can be had for $4.35 per 102oz can in bulk, while some San Marzano D.O.P. cannot be obtained for under $5.10 per can in bulk (a 20% jump in price for tomatoes that are often not even as good in quality!)

At the end of the day, you are going to have to contact all of the wholesalers in your area, arrange a meeting and they are usually very helpful at providing pricing information specific to the quantities you intend to use. Dittos for your wine and beer distributors, linen service, etc. etc.

If you have an equipment item list and know the amperage demands of the items and about how many hours a day they will be in use, your utility company can provide cost estimates for your electrical needs as well.

It's a tedious process, but a necessary one if you want your business plan to have the most locally specific cost projections in it (and you do).

Good luck...an exciting time for you! --K
« Last Edit: February 21, 2013, 01:01:08 PM by pizzablogger »
"It's Baltimore, gentlemen, the gods will not save you." --Burrell

Offline pizzablogger

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Re: Costing ingredients
« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2013, 01:05:54 PM »
I forgot to add:

If you have a Restaurant Depot near you, that is an excellent spot to use for general pricing to formulate initial, high level costing. They have nearly every item you will use under one roof (equipment and food). And while you will likely not find each specific brand you ultimately prefer to use, they often have similar items to get you a running start on pricing.

I've literally walked through there with a digital voice recorder, notebook and cell phone camera for well over an hour when researching my pizza stand costs.

While the actual costs will likely differ when you get specific pricing from individual wholesalers/distributors, it is better than nothing. For that reason alone, it would be worth a good drive to get at least get a start. --K
"It's Baltimore, gentlemen, the gods will not save you." --Burrell

Offline hotsawce

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Re: Costing ingredients
« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2013, 02:40:51 PM »
Thanks so much for the reply, guys. I've thought about the Restaurant Depot walk-through, just wasn't sure if they allowed non-members to browse.

I'm primarily concerned with pricing everything conservatively and making sure I don't miss anything!

Offline thezaman

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Re: Costing ingredients
« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2013, 04:51:10 PM »
if you want base prices i could send copies of some of my invoices,pm me.

Offline JConk007

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Re: Costing ingredients
« Reply #6 on: February 21, 2013, 08:34:17 PM »
RD  will give you a 1 day pass  bring your recorder !
I also casually  take pic of item and price don't stage it just snap that's been helpful fore
John
I Love to Flirt with Fire! www.flirtingwithfirepizza.com

Offline GotRocks

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Re: Costing ingredients
« Reply #7 on: March 03, 2013, 10:18:04 PM »
What would you like me to check prices on, O can open my E-Sysco ordering page and copy and paste current prices for you easily enough.

Your 3 main ingredients will also be the 3 most volatile in pricing.

Watch block cheese pricing, and see if you can get your sales rep to price you no more than $0.10 over block commodity prices.

Flour, watch hard red spring wheat futures.

And for tomato products, watch agriculture news for CA & FL

Beef follows petroleum costs, pork follows grain costs.
Pork is falling again thankfully, beef is on the rise right now. And scary to me, is pigs ears are the most costly part of the pig right now! I can get boneless backloins for half the cost/LB of damn ears. (I smoke pig ears for doggie treats for our customers)

If you need help setting selling costs, let me know. it is an easy formula I use once I determine my labor costs for said items.
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Offline pizza dr

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Re: Costing ingredients
« Reply #8 on: March 04, 2013, 04:09:42 PM »
Just out of curiosity... What benefit do you get out of watching futures and petroleum costs?  By that, I mean what can you do about it?  If you see a trend for higher gas prices does that change what you do in your business in terms of costing?  You still need to buys those ingredients no matter what right? 

Thanks

Scot


Offline GotRocks

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Re: Costing ingredients
« Reply #9 on: March 05, 2013, 10:56:28 AM »
Just out of curiosity... What benefit do you get out of watching futures and petroleum costs?  By that, I mean what can you do about it?  If you see a trend for higher gas prices does that change what you do in your business in terms of costing?  You still need to buys those ingredients no matter what right? 

Thanks

Scot

There are many reason having a look into the future helps you with.
Here's an example I just benefited from last weekPork is at an annual low right now, since we use about 1,800 pounds of pork belly annually, I was able to pre-buy almost a ton of pork belly at a price that is locked in so my costs do not increase when the market does. So when the market goes up 50% over the next 5-6 months, I am not paying those high prices since I already have those 1,600 pounds of it reserved already. And I do not need to store or handle it, my supplier has it and I get it as needed.

Flour has been very volatile this last decade, if you see that the price will rise dramatically in the near future, see if your supplier will let you lock in a guaranteed price so your food-cost ratio doesn't explode when the increase happens.

A little background on my place;
I expanded our little BBQ catering Biz into a very small restaurant 3 years ago due to high demand and us needing more space to meet that demand.
My first summer we served 20,500 pounds of meat, the following summer that was up to 36,200 pounds. When you are dealing in those volumes, a few cents here and there adds up rapidly, If I can get prices locked in at $2.09/LB for belly as compared to the $3.39/LB I saw over the last several months, I am all over it for a savings of $2,080.00. I see that savings as one months mortgage payment, or insurance, or going towards my Harley Davidson fund. Or I could even pay employee bonuses with that too.

Why am I in this forum if I do BBQ? Because I had hoped to also do wood-fired pizza at my place, but wasn't able to get any financing when I opened,  so we stuck with our core business. Now we are expanding into a larger building, and the pizza operations are finally becoming a reality for us. I have a triple stack of Sveba Dahlen deck ovens, a spiral mixer, a make line, already in place at our new location to offer BBQ & Pizza together, the next step is pressure fryers for fried chicken. I had a plan, it got detoured, now we are back on track again.
A skinny cook is not to be trusted!


Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Costing ingredients
« Reply #10 on: March 05, 2013, 06:13:05 PM »
Why am I in this forum if I do BBQ? Because I had hoped to also do wood-fired pizza at my place, but wasn't able to get any financing when I opened,  so we stuck with our core business. Now we are expanding into a larger building, and the pizza operations are finally becoming a reality for us. I have a triple stack of Sveba Dahlen deck ovens, a spiral mixer, a make line, already in place at our new location to offer BBQ & Pizza together, the next step is pressure fryers for fried chicken. I had a plan, it got detoured, now we are back on track again.

BBQ, pizza, and fried chicken seem like kind of a random combination. I can kinda-sorta see the fire link of BBQ and wood fired pizza, but how does fried chicken fit in? Do you worry about diluting your brand with so many major offerings? It seems like a lot of restaurants fail because they try to be everything to everyone and lose their focus on what they do best that got them into the business in the first place.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline GotRocks

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Re: Costing ingredients
« Reply #11 on: March 05, 2013, 11:39:52 PM »
BBQ, pizza, and fried chicken seem like kind of a random combination. I can kinda-sorta see the fire link of BBQ and wood fired pizza, but how does fried chicken fit in? Do you worry about diluting your brand with so many major offerings? It seems like a lot of restaurants fail because they try to be everything to everyone and lose their focus on what they do best that got them into the business in the first place.

It all ties together, maybe we could call it the "Comfort Food category"? Something for everyone in the family, my only additional items to stock will be my pizza ingredients. I already make sausage in-house.
BBQ, Pizza & fried bird has been my plan from the start of our expansion from catering into a restaurant about 3 years ago, We already do a boatload of chicken through the BBQ pit, So I look at this as just another preparation option of a product that we already stock and cook.

So, back to costs; What would you like quoted off my current Sysco account and meat supplier pricing to get you a ballpark idea?
all of our meatscome from a local large supplier, not Sysco, but I can still quote Sysco prices for you. Our cheese comes from a cheese specialty supplier who handles Grande for my area, and they also handle the Stanislaus line of tomato products too.
My current Sysco pricing listed on their website;
Flour, Bouncer $16.00 per 50# bag
Tomato puree $27.00 6 #10 cans arrezio brand
Grated Whole Milk Mozz $2.73/LB Saputo brand, 6 5# bags
Fresh Ital Sausage $3.35/LB  (J-Ville)
Meat supplier pricing;
73% pork trim right now is $0.79/LB
Whole fresh Boston Butts are $1.06/LB
If you have a great Sausage recipe, I would say grind your own for those savings.
I can share a sausage recipe if you'd like, just not the exact recipe I use for our place, but close.


A skinny cook is not to be trusted!

Offline gabaghool

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Re: Costing ingredients
« Reply #12 on: May 28, 2014, 06:56:11 PM »
I forgot to add:

If you have a Restaurant Depot near you, that is an excellent spot to use for general pricing to formulate initial, high level costing. They have nearly every item you will use under one roof (equipment and food). And while you will likely not find each specific brand you ultimately prefer to use, they often have similar items to get you a running start on pricing.

I've literally walked through there with a digital voice recorder, notebook and cell phone camera for well over an hour when researching my pizza stand costs.

While the actual costs will likely differ when you get specific pricing from individual wholesalers/distributors, it is better than nothing. For that reason alone, it would be worth a good drive to get at least get a start. --K

Just to add....whatever RESTAURANT DEPOT prices their stuff at.....add a little to any company that delivers.....not 100 percent....but close.