Author Topic: Help with caputo 00 pizzeria flour  (Read 1391 times)

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Offline caltheide

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Help with caputo 00 pizzeria flour
« on: February 27, 2013, 05:58:10 PM »
I just received a bag of blue label Caputo 00 Pizzeria flour I ordered.  I'm not exactly sure why I ordered it, it just seemed like a good idea at the time.  It has a protein level of 12.5.  Is this considered a bread or high gluten flour?  Will this work with the Tom Lehmann New York style pizza dough?  I do know now this type of flour is used for a Neapolitan, no oil, no sugar, high heat dough but I'm hoping it will work for the Lehmann dough also.  Anyone used this type of flour for that style pizza?  Thank you, Cindy


Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Help with caputo 00 pizzeria flour
« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2013, 09:06:51 PM »
You can use it as you would your normal flour, although you might have to adjust your hydration a little. 

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Help with caputo 00 pizzeria flour
« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2013, 09:14:00 PM »
caltheide,
12.5 is a strong bread flour and will work nicely with your Lehmann recipe.

Bob
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Offline norma427

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Re: Help with caputo 00 pizzeria flour
« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2013, 10:57:37 PM »
Cindy,

You might want to look at Peterís post at Reply 3 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,17128.msg166777.html#msg166777 if you plan on using Caputo Pizzeria flour in a unmodified home oven. 

You can also see what I did in that same thread when I tried Caputo flour in my deck oven.

Norma
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Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Help with caputo 00 pizzeria flour
« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2013, 09:00:46 AM »
C;
You bet! We use it regularly to make N.Y. style pizza. The absorption is a little lower than what we use for domestic flour, but on the other hand, the dough is a bit softer and handles (opens) nicely.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Help with caputo 00 pizzeria flour
« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2013, 09:36:57 AM »
Cindy,

It isn't very often that members ask about using 00 flour in the Lehmann NY style dough recipe. And, for the longest time, if you did an advanced forum search for such uses, you would not have gotten many hits. I think the main reason was that 00 flours, as unmalted flours, do not do as well in a home oven as with very high temperature ovens, such as very high-temperature Neapolitan style wood-fired ovens. Usually the problem in using 00 flours in a standard home oven setting is that it is hard to get much crust coloration, and there may be textural issues as well. Many of us discovered that blending 00 flours with high protein flours, such as bread flours or high-gluten flours, is a better way to go. That is what Dom DeMarco does at DiFara's with his deck oven. Nonetheless, I did a forum search to turn up some examples on this topic to guide you as you make a decision on this matter:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,13470.msg133771.html#msg133771

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5215.msg44203.html#msg44203

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,9578.msg83082.html#msg83082

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,10529.msg93182.html#msg93182

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,10781.msg96164.html#msg96164

Peter

Offline caltheide

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Re: Help with caputo 00 pizzeria flour
« Reply #6 on: February 28, 2013, 12:34:49 PM »
Thank you for all your replies and help.  I have a lot of reading (recommended posts links) to do.  Does anyone happen to know the absorption rate of the Caputo pizzeria 00 flour?  I googled it and searched here but didn't find any actual rates.  And, I know this will show my lack of knowledge in this area, but what is malted and/or bromated flour? 

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Help with caputo 00 pizzeria flour
« Reply #7 on: February 28, 2013, 01:23:37 PM »
Does anyone happen to know the absorption rate of the Caputo pizzeria 00 flour?  I googled it and searched here but didn't find any actual rates.  And, I know this will show my lack of knowledge in this area, but what is malted and/or bromated flour?  


Cindy,

The rated absorption value for the Caputo 00 Pizzeria flour is 55-57%. See Reply 17 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,2951.msg25328.html#msg25328.

In the U.S., the bulk of the white flours are supplemented with barley malt. The barley malt includes certain enzymes that supplement the same enzymes that naturally occur in milled flours. Those enzymes helps convert damaged starch in the flour (usually damaged during milling) to natural sugars to be used by the yeast as food and also to contribute to final crust coloration if present in sufficient amount.

For a brief discussion of bromates, you might want to take a look at the forum's Pizza Glossary, under Potassium Bromate, at http://www.pizzamaking.com/pizza_glossary.html#P. I should hasten to add that bromates is a very controversial topic, and usually the mere raising of questions about the purpose and effects of bromates brings our members almost to the point of verbal fisticuffs. Consequentially, it is safer to do a Google search on the subject and read the available research on the subject.

While you are at the Pizza Glossary, you might look at other terms that might help clarify different matters for you.

Peter