Author Topic: What to do when a guest offends you?  (Read 5575 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline TomN

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1682
  • Age: 56
  • Location: Seattle, WA
Re: What to do when a guest offends you?
« Reply #25 on: March 04, 2013, 02:28:45 AM »
I've put a lot of thought, time, and effort into trying to produce what I consider to be a delicious pizza crust. To me, a great pizza crust is one that could be eaten with no toppings at all - if you don't have a good crust that could stand on its own, then the complete pizza will never be as good as it could be.

Which brings me to my dilemma. I had some friends over for pizza, and one of them had the nerve to discard the "pizza bones" - the edge crust pieces. I have no problem with people who do this with flavorless, cardboard-like pizza. But I put my heart and soul into that crust, and to see it carelessly discarded... I wanted to strap him to a chair and cram it down his throat!  :angel:

So, what say you, forum members? Should I ever bother to invite this crust-neglecter back again to continue stabbing me in the heart?

__Jason

I would have to start by reminding you that these are your friends that you invited to your house. I am sure that you value their friendship more than your pizza crust. Therefore, try to remember that everyone has different tastes for food. It would appear that they are not doing this on purpose to make you mad. Again, if you value their friendship, then let go of the pizza crust issue. It's only dough.

Also, when i read your comments, i am reminded of a Pizzeria when i was a kid growing up. This place made some of the best Sicilian style pizzas.  The pizza was cooked in a rectangular shaped pizza pan and sold by the slice as well. Some people, like me, wanted the corner pieces, while other people wanted the middle slices without any crust on them. Everybody was different, but I never remember the Pizzeria Cook/Owner ever complaining about anyone's choices. He just served what people what they wanted. Guess what, we always came back for more pizza.

My Point: let your friends eat the pieces or parts of your pizza that they want. Life is too short to lose good friends.


Offline pythonic

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 2661
  • Age: 37
  • Location: Crest Hill, IL
  • Pizza......its what's for dinner!
Re: What to do when a guest offends you?
« Reply #26 on: March 05, 2013, 02:10:56 PM »
My wife and son eat the bones 1st.  Lol guess I'm just lucky.
If you can dodge a wrench you can dodge a ball.

Offline pizzaboyfan

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 476
Re: What to do when a guest offends you?
« Reply #27 on: March 05, 2013, 04:21:37 PM »
I also host lots of parties, with men and their wives,  all concerned about carbs, and they clear their plate, every time.
I just don't have leftover bones. None.
My secret...well it's a damm fine crust, thin, light and just a bit crunchy and the guests can't resist.
When I say light, I make my 12" pies around 170-180 grams.
When I say thin, it's almost as thin as I can stretch it.
When I say crispy, my wheel sings  a bit as it cuts the bottom and the cornicione.

When I do dine out for pizza , for some very authentic Neapolitan pies, I look around at the other diners and my own plates, and I see bones everywhere.

Maybe it's not the guests.
Make those pies so good they can't stop eating.

Perry
« Last Edit: March 05, 2013, 04:27:27 PM by pizzaboyfan »

Offline Chicago Bob

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 12491
  • Location: Durham,NC
  • Easy peazzy
Re: What to do when a guest offends you?
« Reply #28 on: March 05, 2013, 04:51:10 PM »
I also host lots of parties, with men and their wives,  all concerned about carbs, and they clear their plate, every time.
I just don't have leftover bones. None.
My secret...well it's a damm fine crust, thin, light and just a bit crunchy and the guests can't resist.
When I say light, I make my 12" pies around 170-180 grams.
When I say thin, it's almost as thin as I can stretch it.
When I say crispy, my wheel sings  a bit as it cuts the bottom and the cornicione.

When I do dine out for pizza , for some very authentic Neapolitan pies, I look around at the other diners and my own plates, and I see bones everywhere.

Maybe it's not the guests.
Make those pies so good they can't stop eating.

Perry
Ouch.... :o
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23363
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: What to do when a guest offends you?
« Reply #29 on: March 05, 2013, 05:06:11 PM »
Perry,

Your crusts are very lightweight (around 6 ounces) and very thin (with a thickness factor of around 0.05), and I suspect that cheese and toppings are modest also, so I can see how your guests might not leave anything behind.

Peter

Offline Chicago Bob

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 12491
  • Location: Durham,NC
  • Easy peazzy
Re: What to do when a guest offends you?
« Reply #30 on: March 05, 2013, 05:09:35 PM »
Starvation....that's the ticket!!  ;D
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline pizzaboyfan

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 476
Re: What to do when a guest offends you?
« Reply #31 on: March 05, 2013, 05:40:50 PM »
Starvation ?
I don't think so.
I generally make 1 1/2 to two  doughs per guest and i keep turning out pies until they can't take any more.
A typical guy wil eat 1 1/2 pies , and the gals will do the better part of 1 , at least.
They all come out on plates, and guests take slices.
The gals don't even realize they ate a whole pie.
I usually have a few extra doughs at the end, but even when everyone cries uncle, and they can't eat another..there aren't any bones.


Ask any chef how he measures his success, and he'll tell you he just looks at what comes back on the plate.

Offline pizzaboyfan

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 476
Re: What to do when a guest offends you?
« Reply #32 on: March 05, 2013, 05:42:32 PM »
Perry,Your crusts are very lightweight (around 6 ounces) and very thin (with a thickness factor of around 0.05), and I suspect that cheese and toppings are modest also, so I can see how your guests might not leave anything behind.
Peter

Thank you, I think <g>.

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23363
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: What to do when a guest offends you?
« Reply #33 on: March 05, 2013, 05:54:07 PM »
Perry,

It is hard to make 12" pizzas with a thickness factor of only 0.05, and do so consistently, and not end up with thin spots. That's a tribute to your pizza making skills.

Peter


Offline pizzaboyfan

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 476
Re: What to do when a guest offends you?
« Reply #34 on: March 05, 2013, 06:06:35 PM »
The pie in my avatar is 3-4 years old, but is still very typical of what I make.


Offline derricktung

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 505
  • Age: 35
  • Location: Chicago
Re: What to do when a guest offends you?
« Reply #35 on: March 06, 2013, 10:28:27 AM »
Perry,

Your crusts are very lightweight (around 6 ounces) and very thin (with a thickness factor of around 0.05), and I suspect that cheese and toppings are modest also, so I can see how your guests might not leave anything behind.

Peter

Peter,

What's the formula for calculating thickness factor?  I'm curious how you figured out how thin his dough is, especially since I can't figure out how to account for the thicker corncione section...

Thanks!


Offline Jet_deck

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 3052
  • Location: Corpus Christi, Texas
Re: What to do when a guest offends you?
« Reply #36 on: March 06, 2013, 10:43:52 AM »
Peter,

What's the formula for calculating thickness factor?  I'm curious how you figured out how thin his dough is, especially since I can't figure out how to account for the thicker corncione section...

Thanks!



Under "T" in the glossary.  "T" for "thickness factor"

http://www.pizzamaking.com/pizza_glossary.html
Her mind is Tiffany-twisted, she got the Mercedes bends

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23363
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: What to do when a guest offends you?
« Reply #37 on: March 06, 2013, 11:02:13 AM »
Peter,

What's the formula for calculating thickness factor?  I'm curious how you figured out how thin his dough is, especially since I can't figure out how to account for the thicker corncione section...
Derrick,

Perry mentioned that he uses 170-180 gram dough balls for a 12" pizza.

For a dough ball weight of 170 grams, and a 12" pizza size with a radius of 6", the thickness factor is (170/28.35)/(3.14159 x 6 x 6) = 0.05302.

For a dough ball weight of 180 grams, and the same size pizza, etc., the thickness factor is (180/28.35)/(3.14159 x 6 x 6) = 0.05614.

The above thickness factor values are, at best, guides, since variations in the size of the rims can affect the crust thickness for the rest of the crust. In practice, you can tweak the thickness factor values (e.g., by using one of the dough calculating tools) to achieve the desired thickness of the crust outside of the area of your particular sized rim.

Peter

Offline MaximusTG

  • In Memoriam
  • Posts: 48
  • Age: 30
  • Location: Netherlands
Re: What to do when a guest offends you?
« Reply #38 on: March 06, 2013, 12:19:04 PM »
And I'm guessing this 28.35 value is the density of pizza dough?
How do you get the dough to become crispy with such a thin sheet? Baking at really high temperature?

Oh, I completely get the disappointment/anger when someone doesn't eat the rim. Or ruins the pizza when they want to top it themselves. *Shudder*
Rest In Peace - April 25, 2014

Offline derricktung

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 505
  • Age: 35
  • Location: Chicago
Re: What to do when a guest offends you?
« Reply #39 on: March 06, 2013, 04:04:29 PM »
Derrick,

Perry mentioned that he uses 170-180 gram dough balls for a 12" pizza.

For a dough ball weight of 170 grams, and a 12" pizza size with a radius of 6", the thickness factor is (170/28.35)/(3.14159 x 6 x 6) = 0.05302.

For a dough ball weight of 180 grams, and the same size pizza, etc., the thickness factor is (180/28.35)/(3.14159 x 6 x 6) = 0.05614.

The above thickness factor values are, at best, guides, since variations in the size of the rims can affect the crust thickness for the rest of the crust. In practice, you can tweak the thickness factor values (e.g., by using one of the dough calculating tools) to achieve the desired thickness of the crust outside of the area of your particular sized rim.

Peter


Thanks!  Was very curious how one went about calculating this...  so when VPN claims that pizzas must be no more than 0.3 cm and crust no more than 2 cm, as they using a a thickness factor-like calculation, or physically measuring?


Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23363
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: What to do when a guest offends you?
« Reply #40 on: March 06, 2013, 04:12:14 PM »
And I'm guessing this 28.35 value is the density of pizza dough?
Thomas,

No, the 28.35 number is to convert grams to ounces in order to do the thickness factor calculation. There are 28.35 grams in an ounce.

Peter

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23363
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: What to do when a guest offends you?
« Reply #41 on: March 06, 2013, 04:19:57 PM »
...  so when VPN claims that pizzas must be no more than 0.3 cm and crust no more than 2 cm, as they using a a thickness factor-like calculation, or physically measuring?
Derrick,

The VPN measurements are physical measurements. About the only ones who use thickness factors are the members of this forum, including Tom Lehmann, from I learned about the thickness factor several years ago. However, he usually uses the expression "density loading factor". If you are interested, you can read more on this topic at Reply 918 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,576.msg130858/topicseen.html#msg130858.

Peter


Offline MaximusTG

  • In Memoriam
  • Posts: 48
  • Age: 30
  • Location: Netherlands
Re: What to do when a guest offends you?
« Reply #42 on: March 07, 2013, 04:04:09 AM »
Thomas,

No, the 28.35 number is to convert grams to ounces in order to do the thickness factor calculation. There are 28.35 grams in an ounce.

Peter

Ah, okay, of course (more of a metric guy myself ;) )! So the thickness factor is measured in ounces per square inch right?

I thought the thickness factor was the actual thickness of the pizza dough before bake in inches . Which gives a 2,5 mm thick pizza dough for 0.1 thickness factor. But I see that it is not so.

I guess it is of course impossible to calculate the density of the pizza dough, since the volume of the risen dough probably does decrease a bit when shaping the pizza.
Rest In Peace - April 25, 2014

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23363
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: What to do when a guest offends you?
« Reply #43 on: March 07, 2013, 09:29:51 AM »
Ah, okay, of course (more of a metric guy myself ;) )! So the thickness factor is measured in ounces per square inch right?

I thought the thickness factor was the actual thickness of the pizza dough before bake in inches . Which gives a 2,5 mm thick pizza dough for 0.1 thickness factor. But I see that it is not so.

I guess it is of course impossible to calculate the density of the pizza dough, since the volume of the risen dough probably does decrease a bit when shaping the pizza.
Thomas,

Yes, the thickness factor is ounces per square inch (of surface area). The shape of the pizza doesn't matter. It can be round (with a surface area of Pi x R2), or rectangular (with a surface area of length times width), or any other shape whose surface area can be calculated. Since two different types of skins can have the same thickness factor but different actual thicknesses (also, some types of skins, like those that are used to make cracker style pizzas, can have no rims), some members prefer to work with dough weights rather than thickness factors. Perry may be one of those persons.

Peter

Offline james456

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 37
  • Location: England, UK
  • NY & American Style Pizza Lover
Re: What to do when a guest offends you?
« Reply #44 on: March 13, 2013, 07:17:13 PM »
I've put a lot of thought, time, and effort into trying to produce what I consider to be a delicious pizza crust. To me, a great pizza crust is one that could be eaten with no toppings at all - if you don't have a good crust that could stand on its own, then the complete pizza will never be as good as it could be.

Which brings me to my dilemma. I had some friends over for pizza, and one of them had the nerve to discard the "pizza bones" - the edge crust pieces. I have no problem with people who do this with flavorless, cardboard-like pizza. But I put my heart and soul into that crust, and to see it carelessly discarded... I wanted to strap him to a chair and cram it down his throat!  :angel:

So, what say you, forum members? Should I ever bother to invite this crust-neglecter back again to continue stabbing me in the heart?

__Jason

His reaction was perfectly normal.

If you're cooking for others, you generally have to find the middle ground between your taste and theirs. Sometimes you have to take the time to develop their palette for different pizzas in the same way one develops their palette for wine or chocolate, resulting in a greater appreciation for the food.

Offline patdakat345

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 59
Re: What to do when a guest offends you?
« Reply #45 on: March 14, 2013, 10:44:53 AM »
Why get offended. I run into this all the time. Somebody is allergic to pepper, somebody is vegetarian, seafood allergies etc. And some have teeth or chewing problems.
I invite people because I like them; otherwise why invite them?
I tell people that if they don't like a particular pizza or any other food that I make let me know and I'll make reasonable accommodation the next time.
Also keep in mind when you have a party, that there is going to be waste, whether it's the crust or some other food. Don't sweat it, not everybody is going to like everything you make. Enjoy the cooking, enjoy your friends.

Pat