Author Topic: Baking a Chicago style on a stone?  (Read 1093 times)

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Offline crthiel

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Baking a Chicago style on a stone?
« on: March 07, 2013, 08:18:45 PM »
The title might be misleading.  The pizza would still be in the pan.

I'm having some people over tomorrow and I'm making a Chicago deep dish pizza in a 14" anodized aluminum hard coat pan.  It's one of the "dark" pans. This is actually my pan:

http://www.webstaurantstore.com/american-metalcraft-hc80142-straight-sided-deep-dish-hard-coat-anodized-aluminum-pizza-pan-14-x-2/124HC80142.html

I'm going to be making some normal pizzas as well but my oven is pretty small and I can only cook one pizza at a time.  Since the Chicago takes like 20-25 minutes, I'd like to cook it first but I want to have my stone hot and ready so I can start sliding in some normal pizzas once the Chicago is done as those only take like 8 minutes.

My main question is, can I just put my chicago in the pan on pre-heated stone?  Will it still cook okay and not burn?  Should I adjust any cook times or temperatures? I usually cook a Chicago per the popular recipe on this site at 450 for 20-25 minutes. I really don't think it will hurt anything but I just wanted to make sure before I entertained people.

After that, my plan is to bump the oven up and wait a bit for the stone to catch up but it won't take long since its already at 450 and can start cooking my normal pizzas.

Any advice would be appreciated.


Offline vcb

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Re: Baking a Chicago style on a stone?
« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2013, 08:30:55 PM »
My main question is, can I just put my chicago in the pan on pre-heated stone?  Will it still cook okay and not burn? 

My 2 cents:
Many of us recommend baking your deep dish on a preheated stone, so it's not a problem.
As for adjustments, that really depends on your oven.
In general, if you're getting good results without the stone, you'll probably want to pull your deep dish out 5 minutes early (or more) when using a stone to avoid over-baking the bottom. The only way to know how long is to try it once in your oven and see how much your oven varies using a stone.

I don't know what size pizza your baking, but my deep dish 12" pizzas usually take 30-40 minutes to bake at about 460.
I say this a lot in my posts, but I often use a sheet of heavy duty aluminum foil on the top rack to shield the top of the pizza. :chef:

On the rare occasion when I make thin crust, I usually crank the oven up to 500 if I'm baking directly on the stone.

-- Ed Heller -aka- VCBurger -- Real Deep Dish - Deep Dish 101
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Offline crthiel

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Re: Baking a Chicago style on a stone?
« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2013, 08:38:58 PM »
Thanks! 

My pizza will be 14".  I'll definitely pull it out a few minutes earlier and check it.

I usually cook my normal pizzas at 550 so once the Chicago comes out, I'll be cranking the oven up.

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Baking a Chicago style on a stone?
« Reply #3 on: March 11, 2013, 11:32:26 PM »
Thanks! 

My pizza will be 14".  I'll definitely pull it out a few minutes earlier and check it.

I usually cook my normal pizzas at 550 so once the Chicago comes out, I'll be cranking the oven up.
You are using the same pan that I use and they are excellent. With that pan I don't need the extended preheat to saturate a stone....this pan will give you a nice even bake.

Ed's bake time and temp. is solid and with that and my set up I never need the foil trick. But like he said...all ovens has there own personalities and it may take a bake or 2 to zereo in.
Good luck and have fun...hope it turns out awesome!!

Bob
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Baking a Chicago style on a stone?
« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2013, 08:58:38 AM »
When I'm baking my Chicago style pizzas on a stone I always place a pizza screen under the pan to create a heat break which helps to prevent the bottom from getting overly done, heck, without it the bottom of the pizza burns in my oven.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline crthiel

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Re: Baking a Chicago style on a stone?
« Reply #5 on: March 14, 2013, 07:39:06 AM »
Thanks for all the replies.

I just cooked it on my stone after my oven preheated for like 30 minutes.  It turned out about the same as usual.  No difference.  I may actually cook it for a couple minutes longer. 

And where in the world do you guys find "6 in 1" tomato sauce? I can't find it anywhere!  I've tried using diced tomatoes, Contadina crushed tomatoes and while they all taste great, each is slightly watery and leads to a messy (albeit delicious) pizza.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Baking a Chicago style on a stone?
« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2013, 09:31:28 AM »
And where in the world do you guys find "6 in 1" tomato sauce? I can't find it anywhere!

crthiel,

There are some stores here and there scattered around the country that sell the 6-in-1s at retail but many of our members buy the 6-in-1 tomatoes directly from Escalon, at https://www.escalon.net/shop.aspx. However, there is a tomato product sold at most Wal-Marts under the brand name Classico, also produced by Escalon, that is very similar to the 6-in-1s. It is the Classico Peeled Ground Tomatoes such as shown at http://tomatoes.classico.com/products/.

Peter

Offline MightyPizzaOven

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Re: Baking a Chicago style on a stone?
« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2013, 09:52:50 AM »
Try Classico Peeled Ground Tomatoes from Walmart, it is pretty good you may need to drain it a bit...
Bert,