Author Topic: Suggested woods to be used for WFO?  (Read 543 times)

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Offline derricktung

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Suggested woods to be used for WFO?
« on: March 10, 2013, 06:57:49 AM »
All,

I'm planning out the rest of my business, and haven't quite taken into account the cost of wood yet so I'm turning to all of you for advice.   :)

What kind of wood is recommended for commercial cooking (farmer's market on weekends) with a WFO?  I'd like to do some local research to figure out what the expense is and make sure to "bake" it into my pizza pricing.

And while I know it varies by region/area, if you have any ideas as to what typical pricing is for Chicago area, any advice would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks!
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Offline tombiasi

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Re: Suggested woods to be used for WFO?
« Reply #1 on: March 10, 2013, 09:44:55 AM »
I would think where you are located you would get the best price on maple.
You are not looking for any wood flavor just a long clean burn.

Offline dineomite

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Re: Suggested woods to be used for WFO?
« Reply #2 on: March 10, 2013, 09:54:09 AM »
Whatever you get, you want something with low moisture content. I typically shoot for 15% or lower. It will transfer more heat to your oven and weigh less when transporting to your cooking site.

I like oak because it's plentiful in my area and makes a longer lasting coal bed. If you go on Craigslist you're going to find a wide range of prices and an even wider range of what people's idea of 'seasoning' is. There are some real shiesters out there (saying it's dry wood, or a certain quantity when it's not)  and unfortunately it ends up being a trial and error type thing. If you've got any WFO restaurant friends I'd get a rec from them.

Wet wood, species, price, and verifying the quantity of wood you're getting are all things that will directly or indirectly cut into your bottom line.

Offline trosenberg

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Re: Suggested woods to be used for WFO?
« Reply #3 on: March 10, 2013, 10:01:23 AM »
While any seasoned hardwood will do the job Oak is the gold standard.  To see if the wood is seasoned, take a look at from the cut ends.  There should be cracks in the wood.  This is known as checking and indicates wood that has been dried out.  The morning after I use my wfo I load it up with wood and let the wood stay in the oven with the door open for a day or so.  This yields a load of really dry wood for the next firing.   
Trosenberg

Offline derricktung

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Re: Suggested woods to be used for WFO?
« Reply #4 on: March 10, 2013, 10:35:31 AM »
Thanks for the great responses so far.  I'll be keeping an eye out for oak and maple and start checking some prices.

And thanks for the tip about drying out the wood in my oven post fire!  Never even thought about that... very smart.
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Offline shuboyje

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Re: Suggested woods to be used for WFO?
« Reply #5 on: March 10, 2013, 10:54:18 AM »
I would imagine Chicago is similar to Michigan in that Ash is in high supply thanks to the emerald ash borer.  It's a great wood to fire an oven on, and my prime staple because there is just so much around.
-Jeff