Author Topic: Oven Options  (Read 2077 times)

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Offline raji

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Oven Options
« on: January 12, 2006, 11:51:06 PM »
I've working away for the past year on perfecting my pizza.  Thanks to this site, I feel like I've made some serious progress!  However, I fear that my oven is holding me back.  I'm trying to make pizza that closely resembles that of Patsy's / Lombardi's. 

Unfortunately, my oven only goes to 500.  I've been following these forums very closely and have found that PF Taylor and Varasano have been able to get their oven's hot enough to make the type of pizza's I'm going for.  I'm currently renting a house, so I'm somewhat hesistant to start tinkering with self-cleaning cycle.

Given that, I'm leaning towards buying a grill. PF Taylor (and others who might know), I was hoping you would be willing to elaborate on your setup.  In specific:

1.  How hot can your grill go?
2.  Do the pizza's you make come out smoky in flavor?
3.  How big of a pizza can you make on your grill?
4.  Do you place a stone on your grill? 
5.  What kind of grill do you have? 

Thanks in advance,
Raj


Offline AKSteve

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Re: Oven Options
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2006, 08:01:22 PM »
If you're thinking of a grill, also look into a Kamado (www.kamado.com). They're made from ceramics and have a dome shaped lid that reflects heat so it cooks from all sides. They sell excellent charcoal that's made from coconut shells that doesn't add any sort of smoky flavor. I can get up to 800-1000 degrees with a full load of charcoal and keep it there for a few hours. They also make some really good baking stones that work well for pizza's.

Plus, when you aren't making pizza's, you can make the best low & slow barbecue imaginable. With a full load of charcoal, my grill will hold 225 degrees for about 30 hours or so.

Steve

Offline RockyMarciano

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Re: Oven Options
« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2006, 11:48:35 PM »
I laugh at the very thought of grilling a pizza

Offline AKSteve

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Re: Oven Options
« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2006, 12:03:31 AM »
It's not grilling. The charcoal at the bottom is just a heat source, like the charcoal ovens in New York. I bake my pizza's on a pizza stone, just like most everyone else here.

Getting back to the original poster's question, I take back my suggestion of getting a Kamado as I just noticed you said you're renting a house. My ceramic Kamado weighs over 450lbs, so I don't think you'd want to have to move something like that when your lease is up.

Steve
« Last Edit: January 14, 2006, 12:05:47 AM by AKSteve »

Offline pftaylor

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Re: Oven Options
« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2006, 09:05:06 AM »
raji,
Kindly do a search on my posts and you will find a treasure trove of information on my journey to 800 degree grilling of pizza.

Here is my current position. I thought about modifying my oven but decided against it and continued on the path of controlling the vicious heat put out by the infra-red TEC grill (800 degrees at the grate level). In the past, with conventional grills, I had not been successful in grilling pizza due to never being able to obtain the correct balance between top and bottom heat. Grilling pizza is not for everyone and practically speaking, requires immense dedication to getting it right. Obstacles such as having no visibility into the cooking area make it very hard to master.

The TEC was about two grand and for that kind of money you could build a wood burning oven and achieve the highest level of baking available. My next step is to build a true Neapolitan oven based on the plans of fellow member pizzanapoletana.   

Good luck on your journey. Mine has been worth every red cent.
Pizza Raquel is Simply Everything Youd Want.
www.wood-firedpizza.com

Offline PizzaDanPizzaMan

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Re: Oven Options
« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2006, 06:08:56 PM »
Raji,
I doubt that the grill I am using is quite what you are looking for but I will say it does a very good job of doing pizzas during the time of year in which I simply will not crank up the oven. I use a Char-broil Front Avenue, 3-burner grill. I modified it to work with natural gas, which simply required drilling the orifices oversize on the burners. I use unglazed quarry tiles directly on the grates and then I cook the pies on aluminum pans. The pies come out very nice considering they are done in a virtually uncontrolled environment. Here are pictures of pies cooked on this grill. (The pie in the oven pictured below is just sitting in a lighted oven awaiting the cooking of pie number 2.)  BTW, the temp gage in the lid of the grill seems to max out at about 500 degrees on a nice warm day, I have no idea what the temp is at the grate or on the tiles for that matter but I guess it approaches 650 degrees however as one would expect, the heat dissipates very quickly with any exchange of pies so after the first pie the cooking times start to increase significantly. The first pie cooks in about 6 minutes.

To specifically answer your other questions:
2. No smoky flavor whatsoever.
3. My large pan is 16" and that is the max the grill will handle.


Good luck in your hunt,
Dan

Offline raji

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Re: Oven Options
« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2006, 07:16:40 PM »
raji,
Kindly do a search on my posts and you will find a treasure trove of information on my journey to 800 degree grilling of pizza.

Here is my current position. I thought about modifying my oven but decided against it and continued on the path of controlling the vicious heat put out by the infra-red TEC grill (800 degrees at the grate level). In the past, with conventional grills, I had not been successful in grilling pizza due to never being able to obtain the correct balance between top and bottom heat. Grilling pizza is not for everyone and practically speaking, requires immense dedication to getting it right. Obstacles such as having no visibility into the cooking area make it very hard to master.

The TEC was about two grand and for that kind of money you could build a wood burning oven and achieve the highest level of baking available. My next step is to build a true Neapolitan oven based on the plans of fellow member pizzanapoletana.   

Good luck on your journey. Mine has been worth every red cent.

PFTaylor,

Thanks for your insight.  I'll definitely search through your posts.

I guess I'll need to rethink my options here.  Maybe it's time to buy a house so I can build a wood burning oven  ;D.


 

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