Author Topic: No knead method using Lehmann recipe?  (Read 1449 times)

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Offline Chi_Guy

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No knead method using Lehmann recipe?
« on: February 14, 2013, 06:06:11 PM »
My most recent pie was a pan pizza using the no-knead method popularized by Jim Lahey.  You can check out the recipe here (http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2013/01/foolproof-pan-pizza-recipe.html) and the pie I made here (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,23064.0.html).

Long story short, I liked the crust that the no-knead method produced and wondered if I could apply the same technique to the Lehmann recipes I use for my NY style pies.  I would be much simpler than using the mixer and from my research and limited experience, it results in a dough with as much gluten formation as dough that was manually kneaded.  Has anyone ever tried this for a NY style crust?  How do the taste and texture differ from a regular Lehmann's crust that's been kneaded on a KA and allowed to sit for a day or two in the fridge?

Thanks.


Online Chicago Bob

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Re: No knead method using Lehmann recipe?
« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2013, 01:07:01 AM »
My most recent pie was a pan pizza using the no-knead method popularized by Jim Lahey.  You can check out the recipe here (http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2013/01/foolproof-pan-pizza-recipe.html) and the pie I made here (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,23064.0.html).

Long story short, I liked the crust that the no-knead method produced and wondered if I could apply the same technique to the Lehmann recipes I use for my NY style pies.  I would be much simpler than using the mixer and from my research and limited experience, it results in a dough with as much gluten formation as dough that was manually kneaded.  Has anyone ever tried this for a NY style crust?  How do the taste and texture differ from a regular Lehmann's crust that's been kneaded on a KA and allowed to sit for a day or two in the fridge?

Thanks.
Hey Chi,
Your post sorta takes everything around back in a circle(to me)...if.." from my research and limited experience, it results in a dough with as much gluten formation as dough that was manually kneaded."

It sounds like you've answered your own question friend.

Myself...for these relatively small batches I make the whole dough flat on my counter.

I enjoyed your other post alot....."I also think this is a great recipe for kids or beginners since it's so simple and straightforward."  Thanks......http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,23064.msg237420.html#msg237420

"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline Morgan

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Re: No knead method using Lehmann recipe?
« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2013, 03:43:04 AM »
My most recent pie was a pan pizza using the no-knead method popularized by Jim Lahey.  You can check out the recipe here (http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2013/01/foolproof-pan-pizza-recipe.html) and the pie I made here (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,23064.0.html).


Thanks for sharing, i will test this recipe maybe next week.

Offline Chi_Guy

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Re: No knead method using Lehmann recipe?
« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2013, 10:03:23 AM »
Thanks ChicagoBob.  I guess the best way is to experiment and find out.  I plan to make a pie next week so will report back soon on my findings..

Offline Chi_Guy

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Re: No knead method using Lehmann recipe?
« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2013, 01:27:42 PM »
So I finally got around to trying a no-knead dough for NY style pizza a couple of days ago.  The dough formulation I used was the same one described in my recent post here:  http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,23291.0.html

Except instead of using a mixer, this time I mixed all the ingredients by hand till they just came together, covered, and let it sit for about 24 hours.  After 24 hours took it out of the bowl, sprinkled a little flour over it, formed it into a dough ball, and let it finish proofing for another 2 hours before using it.  One thing I would advise is if using the Lehmann recipe, factor in a high bowl residue compensation because this dough ends up sticking all over the bowl and your fingers.  Placed the dough topped with cheese and tomato sauce on a stone preheated for an hour to 550 degrees to bake.  Now unfortunately since I still am without my pizza peel, I had a mishap sliding the pizza onto the stone which ruined half of the pie  :(

The pieces of the pie that did come out right were quite different than the NY pies I'm used to.  The resulting crust was more tender with lots of crumb/bubbles and some crispiness on the bottom.  Reminded me of the thin crust slices I get at Whole Foods.  It had some chew but not as much as a typical NY pizza and less browning on the bottom.  But I didn't mind because the amount of chew was just right for a crust this tender.  This dough also had a prominent sourdough taste...I'm not sure how that happened because I didn't use any sourdough starter just the same SAF IDY that I use in all my other pies.  Could the sugar and oil in my recipe have possibly something to do with it?  Indeed, I thought this crust tasted more like bread than pizza dough.  Again not necessarily a bad thing just different.  If you consider the fact that Jim Lahey, the originator of no-knead pizza dough method, is a baker and adapted it from the method he uses to bake artisan bread it makes sense that it would result in a breadlike crust.

I'm not sure if my dough mishap might have skewed things...I'm probably going to try another no-knead Lehmann pie again at some point in time to see if things turn out the same.  At least from this initial experiment, it seems no-knead turns out a different product than the standard kneaded dough.  The latter results in something more similar to NY style pizza while the no-knead method gives a more bread-like product which leads me to believe it would be ideal for a Sicilian type pie.  I had posted about my problems with baking a Sicilian pizza on this forum recently.  Until now I had been using a standard Lehmann dough recipe but now I think the no-knead method may be the way to go since a Sicilian is more akin to baking bread than pizza. 

Back to the pizza lab for now and I will update once I experiment again.  Crumb shot and mangled pizza pics are attached.

Offline jsaras

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Re: No knead method using Lehmann recipe?
« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2013, 11:19:03 AM »
My guess would be that the Lahey approach wouldn't work well with the standard Lehmann formulations.  Lahey's technique works because the combination of high hydration (over 70%) and time (8-24 hours) works as a substitute for kneading.  Lehmann's formulations are lower hydration (usually 63% or less), so the gimmick probably isn't going to do its thing.
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