Author Topic: Dry dough  (Read 639 times)

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Offline mcgrane

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Dry dough
« on: March 12, 2013, 04:41:49 PM »
Hey, back again. After the advice i was given the last time, resulting in very tasty pizza  :chef: The last dough i made was fairly dry.. it took a lot of kneading to form a ball.. and when it was ready, after leaving it over night in the fridge, was not very elastic feeling. Is this from a low level of hydration ?? I have made a handful with similar results.. as i am new to all of this im unsure if its something im doing wrong, in ingrediants or prep.. as  i do remeber some of my earlier ones being alot more strectible.


Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Dry dough
« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2013, 04:50:00 PM »
Yes mcgrane, a dry dough would indicate a low amount of water(hydration).
Check your measurements closely...make sure you are doing things the same way you did on the dough that you had success with.
Bob
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline mcgrane

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Re: Dry dough
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2013, 05:22:44 PM »
That was the confusing part.. i messure it all exactly, because i dont know what im doing :P, and keep it consistent untill i get a base knowledge to go by... maybe ill just try more water in the next go and see how it goes ;)
Thanks !

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Dry dough
« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2013, 05:30:55 PM »
Ok good...that would have been my next suggestion mcgrane. Just add more water in small amount, maybe 1/2 table spoon at a time untill you get the consistency of that good one you made and write down how much more  was needed so you'll have that for next time.  ;)

Bob
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Online mkevenson

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Re: Dry dough
« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2013, 06:00:13 PM »
mcgrane , are you using bakers % to determine the amount of your ingredients. Sorry if you have already discussed your methods elsewhere, my memory is short. If you are not using bakers % then you can questimate by feel. Reproducibility will not be as exact. After mixing flour and water and yeast and salt the dough should come away from the sides of the bowl and form a loose ball. When you start to knead the dough it should feel tachy but not wet, unless of course you are doing a "high hydration dough"
 
If you are using % then 54%- 60% hydration should be a reasonable place to start.
 
Of course Bob's advice is right on!!!!!
 
Mark
"Gettin' better all the time" Beatles

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Dry dough
« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2013, 06:07:37 PM »
mcgrane , are you using bakers % to determine the amount of your ingredients. Sorry if you have already discussed your methods elsewhere, my memory is short. If you are not using bakers % then you can questimate by feel. Reproducibility will not be as exact. After mixing flour and water and yeast and salt the dough should come away from the sides of the bowl and form a loose ball. When you start to knead the dough it should feel tachy but not wet, unless of course you are doing a "high hydration dough"
 
If you are using % then 54%- 60% hydration should be a reasonable place to start.
 
Of course Bob's advice is right on!!!!!
 
Mark
That's a good point..."should come away from the sides of the bowl".


What "style" of pizza would you say you are making with this dough over there in good 'ole Ireland Mr.  mcgrane?

Bob
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline mcgrane

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Re: Dry dough
« Reply #6 on: March 13, 2013, 07:04:22 AM »
I dont know enough about pizza to know the style.. id say eadiable :P I just want a thin base and a bit of a crust.. Dont get my wrong the one i made yesturday was still pritty tasty, i was just excited to try out some dough roll out methods i had seen, but the crust was fairly dry and wouldnt stretch.
As for the %.. my dough is 250g and water is 150ml so that would be 60% ill try abit more the next time.. but maybe i just missmeasured the water or flour the last time :S... Ill enjoy finding oiut ;)

Online mkevenson

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Re: Dry dough
« Reply #7 on: March 13, 2013, 11:25:17 AM »
I dont know enough about pizza to know the style.. id say eadiable :P I just want a thin base and a bit of a crust.. Dont get my wrong the one i made yesturday was still pritty tasty, i was just excited to try out some dough roll out methods i had seen, but the crust was fairly dry and wouldnt stretch.
As for the %.. my dough is 250g and water is 150ml so that would be 60% ill try abit more the next time.. but maybe i just missmeasured the water or flour the last time :S... Ill enjoy finding oiut ;)




If you weigh the flour then you can also weigh the water, this will give you a more precise hydration %.

Mark
"Gettin' better all the time" Beatles

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Dry dough
« Reply #8 on: March 13, 2013, 12:35:12 PM »
To find the ingredient amounts in bakers percent divide the weight of the ingredient by the weight of the flour and multiply by 100. This will give you the bakers percent for each ingredient. To work your formula in bakers percent do the following:
1) Decide how much flour (by weight) you want to use.
2) Using your calculator, enter the ingredient percent you want to find the weight for, then press "X" and now enter the flour weight and press the "%" key and read the weight for that ingredient in the display window.
Also, please keep in mind that the absorption of any flour can/will change to some extent from bag to bag, so don't be too hesitant about making slight absorption adjustments to your dough as this is entirely normal. Normally these variations in absorption are in the magnitude of about 2% of the total flour weight.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline mcgrane

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Re: Dry dough
« Reply #9 on: March 13, 2013, 01:21:44 PM »
I never tought of actually weighing the water :S I just assumed a mil was a gram  :-[
And thanks for the tip on calculating it ;).. ill give it ago in a few days.. im full of pizza :P