Author Topic: Big Green Egg  (Read 1627 times)

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Offline Rubino

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Big Green Egg
« on: January 13, 2006, 01:16:32 PM »
I'm looking for some advice. My father and I - both big fans of making pizza and this site - are going to experiment cooking pies with a Big Green Egg this weekend. We're looking to produce a 12 to 14-inch pizza that, style-wise, falls somewhere between a Neapolitan and New York pie. I've made pizza on both charcoal and gas grills before and ended up with mixed results.

I hate mixed results.

Like many others who contribute to and visit this site, I'm fairly well versed in many of the techniques shared here. So, I'm not an absolute beginner. Still, you can never learn too much or make a pizza that's too good. And, besides, this green monstrosity has me a little a little freaked out.

With that in mind, here's my plea for help: Who out there has had good success with the Big Green Egg and pizza? What's your secret?

Thanks in advance.


Offline Ronzo

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Re: Big Green Egg
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2006, 01:23:47 PM »
Fuggheddabowdit!

~ Ron

Former NY'er living in Texas
http://newtexianbrew.com - http://pinterest.com/NewTexianBrew

Offline tonymark

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Re: Big Green Egg
« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2006, 01:43:14 PM »
I own a BGE and have made many pizzas on it. 

My first pizzas on the BGE were cooked on a perforated pizza pan.  I heated the BGE to 650 F and placed a metal drip pan on the grill.  I place a large v-rack on this pan and place the pizza pan on the rack.  This keep the pizza from burning due to direct heat of fire.

Now I own a pizza stone (that will fit the egg) and a ceramic plate setter.  I use a typical setup with these and have good results.   I like to preheat the stone well.  Lots of BGE owners don't do this, but they don't get it.  The stone needs to be very hot. (but not too hot).

I have tried the stone without the plate setter and burn the crap out of my pizzas.  I bet the stone was 1100+ F. 

By the way, in the winter I generally bake pizza in the conventional oven (with different stone) to get the nice toasty kitchen.

Mark
Making Pizza is not cooking, it is Performance Art!

Offline Ronzo

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Re: Big Green Egg
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2006, 02:12:48 PM »
By the way, in the winter I generally bake pizza in the conventional oven (with different stone) to get the nice toasty kitchen.
We don't want that toasty kitchen down here in Texas... not even in the winter time. ;) It hit 80 over New Year's.

Unfortunately, there's not much we can do about it except crank the A/C to artic levels.
Fuggheddabowdit!

~ Ron

Former NY'er living in Texas
http://newtexianbrew.com - http://pinterest.com/NewTexianBrew


 

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