Author Topic: Homemade yeast  (Read 1046 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline mcgrane

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 31
  • Age: 26
  • Location: Ireland
Homemade yeast
« on: March 14, 2013, 10:58:45 AM »
I was just clicking around the internet in my bordom.. and came across this .. http://www.tacticalintelligence.net/blog/how-to-make-homemade-yeast.htm Its one of a few pages i had found about making your own yeast, like this lady who seems to like to thank her yeast :P. I was just wondering does anyone do this for their own pizza doughs ? Or is there any advantage to the time spent on doing this .. as in taste wise? Or is it just better and easier to go and buy some prepacked yeast


Offline Bill/SFNM

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4039
  • Location: Santa Fe, NM
Re: Homemade yeast
« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2013, 11:43:56 AM »
There is entire board here on Pizzamaking.com with almost 5000 posts that is dedicated to creating, maintaining, and using wild yeast cultures with pizzas:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/board,37.0.html




Offline mcgrane

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 31
  • Age: 26
  • Location: Ireland
Re: Homemade yeast
« Reply #2 on: March 14, 2013, 11:45:46 AM »
Oh cool ! Thanks i had no idea ;).. i tried searching it but wasnt sure what to search.
After first looking at a few posts... and rather then starting a new post, and these are real Newbie questions.. maybe someone could help. Is a sponge the same as a sour-dough ? Or is there a difference. And when it has formed after days.. is this dough then just used instead of the ordinary dough.. or is it mixed ? And does sour-dough have a sour taste when cooked - or is it just called that as it is sour while formenting ?
« Last Edit: March 14, 2013, 11:57:39 AM by mcgrane »

Offline Bill/SFNM

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4039
  • Location: Santa Fe, NM
Re: Homemade yeast
« Reply #3 on: March 14, 2013, 11:50:59 AM »
Oh cool ! Thanks i had no idea ;) .. i tried searching it but wasnt sure what to search.


Various terms are used: wild starter, starter culture, sourdough start ......


In answer to your original post, these cultures are definitely more work, but some of us around here bake breads and pizzas with nothing else. Catching a wild culture from your environment or ingredients as shown in the video is a crap-shoot. You may have to try a few times before you get a viable culture that has both adequate leavening power and a great flavor. Many purchase dehydrated cultures.

Offline mcgrane

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 31
  • Age: 26
  • Location: Ireland
Re: Homemade yeast
« Reply #4 on: March 14, 2013, 11:59:04 AM »
already answered some of my questions before i edited them in :D

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 993
  • Location: Manhattan, KS
Re: Homemade yeast
« Reply #5 on: March 14, 2013, 12:27:47 PM »
MC;
A sponge is different from a sourdough. A sponge might also be called a preferment. A portion of the flour (with yeast and a portion of the water) is blended together and allowed to ferment for 1 to 24-hours to develop flavor. This is then combined with the remainder of the flour and other ingredients to make the dough. A sour would be allowed to ferment for several days or more to develop an acidic flavor and also provide leavening. Only a part of this is used in making the dough. The remainder is replenished (fed) and used to make mo0re dough at a later date. A sour that you made years ago might still be with you today if you have managed it properly so as to maintain the same microflora, hence it will always function the same and produce a like flavor profile. If the sour is mismanaged, either by allowing it to become contaminated or by allowing it to be subjected to incorrect temperatures for the microflora you are cultivating the performance of the sour can change drastically, as can the flavor, normally when this happens it is said that the sour was "lost". TIP: If you work with a sour, store it in multiple containers in different storage facilities (locations), this way if the sour is lost at one location, for whatever reason, you can still use one of the others to inoculate a new sour, thus preserving the performance and flavor imparted by the sour.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline mcgrane

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 31
  • Age: 26
  • Location: Ireland
Re: Homemade yeast
« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2013, 12:48:41 PM »
Ah ok, seems pritty intresting acually :) Id like to give it ago sometime..
A portion of the flour (with yeast and a portion of the water) is blended together and allowed to ferment for 1 to 24-hours to develop flavor.
Just when you say here that flour with yeast and water is blended ... does that mean you have to start off with some form of yeast to begin with.. or is this naturally formed ?

Online Chicago Bob

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 10883
  • Location: North Carolina
  • Easy peazzy
Re: Homemade yeast
« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2013, 01:56:16 PM »
Ah ok, seems pritty intresting acually :) Id like to give it ago sometime..Just when you say here that flour with yeast and water is blended ... does that mean you have to start off with some form of yeast to begin with.. or is this naturally formed ?
From the forum glossary....

SPONGE: A preferment similar to a poolish or biga. It can include part of the flour and yeast and all or a part of the water to be used in the final dough, and is combined with additional flour, water, yeast and salt to make the final dough. The sponge can be allowed to ferment and mature (ripen) at room temperature, under refrigeration, or a combination of both.
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"