Author Topic: Grind malted barley to make diastatic malt powder?  (Read 1105 times)

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Offline chaspie

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Grind malted barley to make diastatic malt powder?
« on: March 16, 2013, 01:23:53 PM »
I'm a homebrewer, so I've always got two-row malted barley on hand.  The diastatic power of the grain I use is roughly 140 degrees Lintner.  Can I simply grind this to a powder in my flour mill and use it as a direct replacement for the diastatic malt powders that are sold for baking? 

I don't know the diastatic power of baking malt powder or flour in general, but the tech sheet for Red Star Diastatic Dry Malt Products (PDF) lists one product at "not less than 20" and another at "not less than 60" degrees Lintner.   

Should I adjust the amount of my milled whole grain malted barley powder compared to baker's diastatic malt powder due to the differing enzymatic activity? 


Offline chaspie

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Re: Grind malted barley to make diastatic malt powder?
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2013, 08:39:50 PM »
I'm not able to edit my previous post, for some reason, but I wanted to correct the link that I had formatted incorrectly. 

The link in the previous post should be Red Star Diastatic Dry Malt Products (PDF)

Offline grathan

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Re: Grind malted barley to make diastatic malt powder?
« Reply #2 on: March 24, 2013, 04:57:24 PM »
Wouldn't it just be the extracted malt and not the husk? I think that is how flour is made anyways.

Offline chaspie

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Re: Grind malted barley to make diastatic malt powder?
« Reply #3 on: March 24, 2013, 09:35:16 PM »
I can imagine that it is quite possible that the husk would be removed first for commercially produced diastatic malt.  I haven't been able to find out enough information about the manufacturing process to know. 

In my case, I could crack the grains in my homebrewing grain mill and sift out some of the husk material before grinding to a fine powder, but I doubt it's worth the effort.  Such small amounts of diastatic malt are added to a dough that it probably makes no difference.  Including the husk probably just dilutes my diastatic power a bit.  I'd have to experiment to establish appropriate quantities for my dough.