Author Topic: Strianese DOP San Marzanos  (Read 3580 times)

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Offline PizzaBrewer

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Strianese DOP San Marzanos
« on: January 14, 2006, 04:45:39 PM »
Anyone try these?  I just found them in an italian shop, $2.59 per 28 oz can, 2004 (!) crop.

Any comments on this brand?

---Guy
Man does not live by bread alone.  There's also tomato, cheese and pepperoni.


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Strianese DOP San Marzanos
« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2006, 05:05:34 PM »
Guy,

They were one of the first DOP San Marzanos I tried and liked them a lot. Unfortunately, the online source where I found them closed down. If you do a Google search you will find very few places that seem to carry the Strianese. The last time I checked, I found only one source. The same outfit also had a store on eBay. My recollection is that the Strianese were very expensive, far more than the price you quoted. You might try a can to see if you like them before buying more.

Peter

Offline pietradoro

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Re: Strianese DOP San Marzanos
« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2006, 07:18:24 PM »
Yes, expensive, very true.  The ChefShop cans are 14oz cans.  The eBay CapriFlavors cans are 28oz (800 grams).  The also stock the Annalisa DOPs.

http://chefshop.com/Itemdesc.asp?CameFrom=Search&CartId=EVEREST-8162395ISOXR5892&ic=4822&tpc=&SR=
http://cgi.ebay.com/La-Strianese-San-Marzano-D-O-P-tomatoes-can-12-800-g_W0QQitemZ4350149287QQcategoryZ43401QQtcZphotoQQcmdZViewItem


I've used the Strianese DOPs and they are excellent.  The cans are enamel lined, too.  Also, I've ordered things from both these stores with good results.

Offline scott r

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Re: Strianese DOP San Marzanos
« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2006, 02:30:07 AM »
I had good luck with a can of these, and then bad luck with a jar.  I found them both in Cali.  They are not as prevalent around here in Boston as the other brands.   I was so excited to find real san marzanos in glass, but they were bitter?????? and expensive ?????

I'll bet I just got a really old jar.  How many people other than me are willing to spend 8 bucks on a small jar of tomatoes.

I would love to try a fresh can next time.

Offline PizzaBrewer

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Re: Strianese DOP San Marzanos
« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2006, 12:18:18 PM »
I bought a can.  All I can say is "Meh".  I have consistently been underwhelmed by authentic San Marzanos.  Like the others I've tried I find them very bland.  Certainly not worth (to me) the price and hype.

I am however very much enjoying the "La Torrente" chopped tomatoes the Caputo importer sent me.  The only indication of origin is "Southern Italy", but the can does talk about them being used by Naples pizzerias.  I don't know their cost, but the cans I got are food service size and not being DOP-regulated I'm sure they are far cheaper than true San Marzanos.

---Guy
Man does not live by bread alone.  There's also tomato, cheese and pepperoni.

Offline Gualtiero

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Re: Strianese DOP San Marzanos
« Reply #5 on: January 17, 2006, 12:47:49 PM »
Do all the expensive tomatoes really make "that" big a difference??

True Story:
I asked the Mrs. to pick me up some Cento Plum Tomatoes for my pizza sauce. The store was out, so she picked up a can of Cento Chef's Cut. I opened the can and tasted. They seemed sweet enough and salty enough, with some Basil in there as well. No seeds, cleaned, sliced, and ready to go! Drained the liquid, hit the can with the immersion blender (boat motor for the Emeril-types), and added Basil and a pinch of Oregano, to taste. NO STOVETOP (a la Varasano)!

Purely by accident, this turned out to be the best (insert emphatic expletive here) pizza sauce I've made, to date.

As a sanity check, last week I got the Cento Plums and made my pizza sauce. It was comparable to "my accident," but not quite as good! Besides that, the plums were alot more work draining, rinsing, seeding, and seasoning! Nevermore. From now on, it's Cento Chef's Cut for me. And the best part is the price......

A-buck-n-a-half-a-can!!!!!

I learned awhile ago, that I was over-seasoning, over-cooking, and over-complicating my pizza sauce.
Now I just KISS and let the tomatoes be tomatoes! I highly recommend giving it a try, if you're so inclined!

Walt

Offline PizzaBrewer

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Re: Strianese DOP San Marzanos
« Reply #6 on: January 17, 2006, 01:18:17 PM »
Do all the expensive tomatoes really make "that" big a difference??

I learned awhile ago, that I was over-seasoning, over-cooking, and over-complicating my pizza sauce.
Now I just KISS and let the tomatoes be tomatoes! I highly recommend giving it a try, if you're so inclined!

Walt

Easy answer, "no"!

I agree 100% with the KISS approach.  You obviously want the best, freshest- and brightest-tasting fruit when you "let the tomatoes be tomatoes".  So it seems we're on an endless, Holy-Grail-type quest to find the mythical "best" tomato!

Personally I think the San Marzano approach is a dead end (at least to my taste).  But there are so many different canned tomatoes out there that it's impossible to resist the urge to try something new.

But in the end, everyone has their own taste and opinion.  Perhaps it's good for me that I don't find the most expensive option to be the best!

---Guy
Man does not live by bread alone.  There's also tomato, cheese and pepperoni.