Author Topic: New to pizza making - Chicago style  (Read 1504 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline TenmaNeko

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 7
  • Location: ohio
  • I Love Pizza!
New to pizza making - Chicago style
« on: March 19, 2013, 08:37:23 PM »
Hi all, the last time I made a pizza, I was around 7, and I did more eating of the toppings than actually helping.

Now I'm a fair bit older, and maybe wiser.  I've had Chicago deep dish a couple times and love it!  So I want to recreate it here at home.

Equipment: oven (duh), pizza stone, 9" x 1.5" round cake pan, the wife's Kitchen Aid mixer with hook.

I'm following the RealDeepDish.com recipe.  I've got King Arthur AP flour and corn oil.  I only have Extra Virgin olive, could I sub butter for the regular olive oil?  Would it still work?
I have never done anything with dough before, so if anyone has any basic things to watch out for, I'm all ears.

I have nice san marzano tomatoes with basil.  They're whole, but I figure crushing tomatoes is something even I can handle.  Probably add some garlic and oregano too.

I'm thinking of a hot/sweet Italian sausage blend, Boar's Head pepperoni and green olives.  (Wife is shaking her head on the olives)  :-D

Is there anything else I should be thinking about? 

Thanks in advance everyone!




Offline pythonic

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1833
  • Age: 36
  • Location: Crest Hill, IL
  • Pizza......its what's for dinner!
Re: New to pizza making - Chicago style
« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2013, 09:56:57 PM »
Hi,

You should be okay with the butter.  Everything you need to know is on that realdeepdish site.  Good luck and be sure to post pics.

Nate
If you can dodge a wrench you can dodge a ball.

Offline TomN

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1384
  • Age: 54
  • Location: Seattle, WA
Re: New to pizza making - Chicago style
« Reply #2 on: March 20, 2013, 12:32:14 PM »
TenmaNeko,

Thanks for letting us know about the realdeepdish.com website. The pizza photos on there look fantastic. It's been a while since I have had a Chicago Style pizza. Time to try some again. Thanks for the posting.

TomN

Offline chaspie

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 150
Re: New to pizza making - Chicago style
« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2013, 04:02:15 PM »
There is also a Chicago style pizza section on this forum that should have plenty of info and inspiration for making Chicago style pizzas.

Offline Chicago Bob

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 8921
  • Location: North Carolina
  • Easy peazzy
Re: New to pizza making - Chicago style
« Reply #4 on: March 20, 2013, 05:28:41 PM »
Hi all, the last time I made a pizza, I was around 7, and I did more eating of the toppings than actually helping.

Now I'm a fair bit older, and maybe wiser.  I've had Chicago deep dish a couple times and love it!  So I want to recreate it here at home.

Equipment: oven (duh), pizza stone, 9" x 1.5" round cake pan, the wife's Kitchen Aid mixer with hook.

I'm following the RealDeepDish.com recipe.  I've got King Arthur AP flour and corn oil.  I only have Extra Virgin olive, could I sub butter for the regular olive oil?  Would it still work?
I have never done anything with dough before, so if anyone has any basic things to watch out for, I'm all ears.

I have nice san marzano tomatoes with basil.  They're whole, but I figure crushing tomatoes is something even I can handle.  Probably add some garlic and oregano too.

I'm thinking of a hot/sweet Italian sausage blend, Boar's Head pepperoni and green olives.  (Wife is shaking her head on the olives)  :-D

Is there anything else I should be thinking about? 

Thanks in advance everyone!
You sound very well prepared.
You have chosen a dough that is good for a first time dough maker. Mix for only a few minutes. Use Ed's dough weight amount for your pizza....it's called Deep Dish because of the pan...not the thickness of the crust. You know that.
Post up a few pics of your completed pie. Not just pretty pics of the top if you end up having questions about things you want to change.

Bob

ps. Welcome aboard!
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline TenmaNeko

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 7
  • Location: ohio
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: New to pizza making - Chicago style
« Reply #5 on: March 22, 2013, 09:07:32 PM »
Thanks for all the support guys!


Offline TenmaNeko

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 7
  • Location: ohio
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: New to pizza making - Chicago style
« Reply #6 on: March 22, 2013, 09:22:42 PM »
Oh, I do have one question:

What's the best way to remove the pizza from the pan intact?

Offline Chicago Bob

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 8921
  • Location: North Carolina
  • Easy peazzy
Re: New to pizza making - Chicago style
« Reply #7 on: March 22, 2013, 09:36:00 PM »
Oh, I do have one question:

What's the best way to remove the pizza from the pan intact?
Make sure your Faith in God is current and up to date.... ;D

But seriously TenmaNeko, that is a very good question and for most it can be quite an experience the first few tries. I am successful with just catching the lip with a butter knife and then you have to do this weird flipping motion with your other hand that is holding the pan.

U tube a pizzeria Uno video and you'll see that they just simply cut and serve it right out of the pan on the table in front of you.....much safer.  ;)

Bob
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline Garvey

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 436
  • I wish could have pizza every day.
Re: New to pizza making - Chicago style
« Reply #8 on: March 22, 2013, 11:00:24 PM »
simply cut and serve it right out of the pan on the table in front of you.....much safer.  ;)

Yep, Bob's right.  I'd say I serve from the pan at least 50% of the time.  When the pizza shows the first sign of not wanting to just slip out of the pan easily, I leave it be.  IIRC, that's pretty much standard at most restaurants.

Watch out for sauce seepage, though, after that first cut.  You may want to throw down some paper towels into the pan if those San Marzanos start giving up their liquid.  (After hand-crushing them for sauce, I'd follow Ed's advice--owner of realdeepdish--to drain them for a while in a mesh strainer. Get as much liquid out as possible.)

Oh, and whatever you do, do NOT cook the sausage first.  (Go raw or go home! :D)

Good luck!
Garvey
« Last Edit: March 22, 2013, 11:02:58 PM by Garvey »

Offline Chicago Bob

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 8921
  • Location: North Carolina
  • Easy peazzy
Re: New to pizza making - Chicago style
« Reply #9 on: March 22, 2013, 11:23:57 PM »



Oh, and whatever you do, do NOT cook the sausage first.  (Go raw or go home! :D)

Good luck!
Garvey
That's riiight....do not be a sissy boy!  ;D

Garvey:
"You may want to throw down some paper towels into the pan if those San Marzanos start giving up their liquid."

Again, here is your chance to be real.....I alwayssuck on that paper towel man!  ;)

Pizza Pal,
Bob
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"


Offline Garvey

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 436
  • I wish could have pizza every day.
Re: New to pizza making - Chicago style
« Reply #10 on: March 22, 2013, 11:55:41 PM »
Again, here is your chance to be real.....I alwayssuck on that paper towel man!  ;)

lol.  Can't let any sausage grease go to waste!

Offline TenmaNeko

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 7
  • Location: ohio
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: New to pizza making - Chicago style
« Reply #11 on: March 23, 2013, 07:19:58 PM »
Wow, this dough seems awfully dry.

Does that sound right?

Offline Chicago Bob

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 8921
  • Location: North Carolina
  • Easy peazzy
Re: New to pizza making - Chicago style
« Reply #12 on: March 23, 2013, 07:31:12 PM »
Wow, this dough seems awfully dry.

Does that sound right?
No...it's got a boat load of oil in it.
Post pics...
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline TenmaNeko

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 7
  • Location: ohio
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: New to pizza making - Chicago style
« Reply #13 on: March 24, 2013, 03:56:12 PM »
Sorry about the lack of posting last night and the few pictures I have.

Turns out repeatedly dropping delicate electronics isn't good for them!  So my phone was kind of on the fritz.

Overall I think it turned out well for my first time.

The first pic is of my initial try at dough.  I don't have a scale, so my measuring was by volume.  I used slightly over a cup of flour, 5 tsp of corn oil, a bit over 1.5 tsp of butter and 1/3 cup of water.
FIRST MISTAKE: I heated the water up too hot before I put the yeast in, which I think killed the ADY.  I used a meat thermometer to check the temp of the water, and I don't think that was the best choice.

I had a hard time getting the Kitchen Aid to mix the dough.  The hook was barely hitting the ingredients, so I used a spatula to try and push things in.  Only worked it around 2 minutes or so.

I felt this dough was too dry, it didn't seem to be coming together very well.

So, I re-made the dough, mixing by hand and adding maybe another 1/9 cup of water to the recipe.  I worked it longer this time, to make sure things were mixed.  At this point I had still over heated the water.  SO an hour later I see the dough hasn't risen at all.  I take some more water, around 1/6 cup, heat it less, mix the yeast and add it to the dough.  I work it in along with some more flour.  I set the bowl on top of the pre-heating oven to get it warm.  I could have let it rise longer, but it was getting late and we were pretty hungry.  Probably rose maybe 40 minutes.  I don't have a pic of this guy.

It spread in the pan fine, but it was fairly sticky.

SECOND MISTAKE: We over pressed the tomatoes after we drained and crushed them, so we didn't really have much tomato left to put on top.  Some pieces of pepperoni got a little singed, but we kinda like that.  My wife doesn't like much sauce, so she was fine with the amount, but I prefer more.
We added fresh basil, one clove of garlic and some oregano to the tomatoes.

We laid Polly-O mozzarella (around 8oz) and then BelGiosioso Piquant Provolone (around 5 or 6 oz) down.  Then about 1/4 lb of hot and mild Italian sausage, uncooked.  A layer of Calabrese salami and then Boar's Head pepperoni.  We spread the tomatoes around as best we could, then grated Parmesan on top.  The oven was at 500, I turned it down to 450 and I put the pizza on top of the stone.  Camera worked, so I snapped a quick pic.  I put a cookie sheet on the rack right above the pizza.

Baked it for 17 minutes, turned and then for another 14 minutes.  I put some foil on top since the pepperonis were getting dark and baked for another 6 minutes.  Total time was 37 minutes.

Final pic is it out of the oven and all done.



Offline TenmaNeko

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 7
  • Location: ohio
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: New to pizza making - Chicago style
« Reply #14 on: March 24, 2013, 04:06:52 PM »
Alright, I prayed to the pizza gods like Chicago Bob recommended, grabbed a cheap plastic spatula and...

Fortune smiled upon me!  The pizza came right on out.

As I was cutting it, I noticed the crust had a crunch to it.

So the crust seemed rather dense.  But it wasn't bad.

My biggest fear was that it'd be terrible, late at night and I'd order delivery filled with shame and and a heavy heart.

But, overall, I'm pleased with my first try.  I look forward to trying it again and refining my techniques.

Thanks everyone for all your help!

Offline Chicago Bob

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 8921
  • Location: North Carolina
  • Easy peazzy
Re: New to pizza making - Chicago style
« Reply #15 on: March 24, 2013, 04:42:49 PM »
You done good TenmaNeko.  :chef:
Glad to see some pics...makes it a lot better, especially, for when a person is asking questions.

If I were you I'd just switch to IDY. However, when I used to use ady I found that all you need to proof it in is your hot water straight out of the tap. Run some hot water in the cup first to warm it and then measure in your formula water...you can add in a pinch of sugar with the yeast and within 5 min. you will know if the yeast is good.
I've been working out of 1lb. IDY kept in the freezer for over a yr. and never a failure.  ;)

You definetly don't want to be working with a dough that you've had to keep going back and adjusting it. Especially one that you had just gotten some correct yeast into it. But I think you learned some good things on this, your first ever dough.

It's extra hard on yourself when using volume measuring. Hold back a good half cup off the flour to the side and you can see if you need any of that after you have mixed everything for a couple min.. DD dough needs very minimal mixing, that's what gives it the biscuit like texture. A mixer is really not necessary. I use a bowl and a spoon to get it going and then usually just dump it all onto the counter and finish with my hands. It should look cottage cheese/brain like...you just want to bring it together.

Good luck on your next one. It sounds like you are paying close attention to things and that is great!  :chef:

Bob
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline Garvey

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 436
  • I wish could have pizza every day.
Re: New to pizza making - Chicago style
« Reply #16 on: March 24, 2013, 09:35:39 PM »
Looks great!

If you enjoyed doing this and think that making pizza will be a new hobby, I'd suggest you get a digital scale ASAP.  Even a cheap one will take out all the guesswork for you.  You'll be glad you did.

Cheers,
Garvey

Offline Chicago Bob

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 8921
  • Location: North Carolina
  • Easy peazzy
Re: New to pizza making - Chicago style
« Reply #17 on: March 24, 2013, 10:34:44 PM »
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline Garvey

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 436
  • I wish could have pizza every day.
Re: New to pizza making - Chicago style
« Reply #18 on: March 25, 2013, 11:43:42 AM »
Good place to start when buying a scale....http://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Signature-AWS-100-Digital/dp/B0012LOQUQ


Actually, Bob, I'd disagree with you on that particular model.  The maximum capacity is 100g, which is too small for flour, water, etc.  (That being said, now I want one for IDY, et al.!  :-D)

Offline Chicago Bob

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 8921
  • Location: North Carolina
  • Easy peazzy
Re: New to pizza making - Chicago style
« Reply #19 on: March 25, 2013, 01:54:24 PM »
Actually, Bob, I'd disagree with you on that particular model.  The maximum capacity is 100g, which is too small for flour, water, etc.  (That being said, now I want one for IDY, et al.!  :-D)
From that page you can pick up that little one(like I did) and then also link to American Weigh's larger models.  ;)
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"


 

pizzapan