Author Topic: Frozen Home Run Inn pizza heating instructions  (Read 7242 times)

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Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Frozen Home Run Inn pizza heating instructions
« Reply #25 on: March 25, 2013, 03:26:29 PM »
Did anyone else get a chuckle at the following posts where pythonic gently mocks the attention to detail some members have and then Norma hits him up for some additional observations? Very funny.

Quote from: pythonic on March 21, 2013, 12:10:54 PM

    Lol u guys and your home run inn pizza hacks.  You all crack me up.  C'mon is it really that good?  I live in Chicago and have had it fresh a couple times.  It's ok but my wife absolutely hates it.

    Nate


Nate,

Lol,  I don't know what a real HRI pizza tastes like.  :-D That is what I am trying to find out.

Since you did have had a fresh HRI pizza did you see the layers in the bottom crust?  If you ever stop at HRI again could you please take a picture close-up of what the crumb looks like.

Norma
Funny stuff redox.....I missed that one, thanks.  :)

Yeah, there ain't no stopping our Norma when she is on a mission...quite a gal!  8)

ps. you gonna like that defrosted 410 bake... ;)
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Online norma427

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Re: Frozen Home Run Inn pizza heating instructions
« Reply #26 on: March 25, 2013, 06:27:17 PM »
I took the second HRI frozen pizza out of the freezer today and will let it thaw overnight in the 'fridge. Plan on doing a 410 ° bake. The first pie done according to box instructions had a crust rim hard as a police baton.

Jay,

I emailed someone at HRI about why my frozen pizza when baked had a gum line and asked about that.  I then mentioned in my next email what temperature did HRI use in their deck ovens years ago because I was interested in the history of HRI.  A person at HRI told me they use 450 degrees F now and also did use that temperature in their deck ovens years ago.  The person told me it is a good idea to defrosted the frozen pizzas first before the bake.  I didn't try that yet, but am going to.

I had enough pizzas this last weekend and that is why I didn't try defrosting first.   :-D

If you get that flakiness after defrosting and baking at whatever temperature you want to could you please post a picture. 

Norma

Offline redox

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Re: Frozen Home Run Inn pizza heating instructions
« Reply #27 on: March 26, 2013, 12:47:33 PM »
Norma,
Thanks for the info. Based on what you discovered I think I'll try a 450° bake.
I'll post a pic if I can keep both wife and dog away long enough.
« Last Edit: March 26, 2013, 01:03:25 PM by redox »

Offline Garvey

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Re: Frozen Home Run Inn pizza heating instructions
« Reply #28 on: March 26, 2013, 02:53:59 PM »
Based on what you discovered I think I'll try a 450° bake.
I'll post a pic if I can keep both wife and dog away long enough.

Good luck!

And when that fails, there's always 410°.  :P

Offline Garvey

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Re: Frozen Home Run Inn pizza heating instructions
« Reply #29 on: March 26, 2013, 02:57:18 PM »
[In case it wasn't obvious, that  ^ was a joke.  :D]

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Frozen Home Run Inn pizza heating instructions
« Reply #30 on: March 26, 2013, 03:08:01 PM »
I have reported on both ways...... that's the best I can do.   ;D
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline redox

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Re: Frozen Home Run Inn pizza heating instructions
« Reply #31 on: March 26, 2013, 03:08:18 PM »
Ha! The emoticon gave it away.
I've got skin like a rhino and not easily offended.
And I know what rhino skin feels like. I've patted one on the side and had him suck my hand into his mouth while feeding him apples. It's ok as long as you keep your fingers in the front, the teeth are in the back of the mouth.

Offline redox

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Re: Frozen Home Run Inn pizza heating instructions
« Reply #32 on: March 26, 2013, 03:09:22 PM »
Bob,
Which way turned out best? I'm about 2 hours from baking one.

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Frozen Home Run Inn pizza heating instructions
« Reply #33 on: March 26, 2013, 03:10:54 PM »
It's in my reports.   :-D
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"


Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Frozen Home Run Inn pizza heating instructions
« Reply #34 on: March 26, 2013, 03:33:18 PM »
410 Jay.... smile!  :)      >:D
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline redox

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Re: Frozen Home Run Inn pizza heating instructions
« Reply #35 on: March 26, 2013, 06:02:42 PM »
I thought I'd try pre-heating the oven to 450 ° and turning it down to 410 ° when inserting the pizza.
There was some flakiness to the crust, not a lot, though. The rim was at least edible, not nearly as hard. The dog was able to eat it w/o utensils.  ;) Much less sauce on this one which was too bad, I liked the sauce on the other one from the 2-pack. They've got 3 or 4 other types of HRI pizza at Costco but I'm done with frozen pizza for quite awhile. I prefer to make my own. A couple of not very good pics to follow.

Offline redox

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Re: Frozen Home Run Inn pizza heating instructions
« Reply #36 on: March 26, 2013, 06:30:44 PM »
Ok Bob, that's enough frozen HRI. I'm gonna be trying some of your Chicago thin crust next time. My standards must be little higher now 'cause frozen just isn't doing it for me anymore.

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Frozen Home Run Inn pizza heating instructions
« Reply #37 on: March 26, 2013, 06:37:40 PM »
Ok Bob, that's enough frozen HRI. I'm gonna be trying some of your Chicago thin crust next time. My standards must be little higher now 'cause frozen just isn't doing it for me anymore.
:-D  I hear ya bro.... :-D
For frozen it ain't bad but man they make you work for that 'lil bit o flavah...and she's not a cheap date either  >:(
Bob's had his fill too...we live and we learn, right Jay.  ;)
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline Garvey

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Re: Frozen Home Run Inn pizza heating instructions
« Reply #38 on: March 26, 2013, 07:39:20 PM »
Frozen has its place, but Bob's right--you really have to work for it.  Frozen is my only option for pizza on a whim.  There is one edible restaurant pizza in my whole town, and I can't eat homemade "emergency dough" pizza anymore.

Offline mrmojo1

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Re: Frozen Home Run Inn pizza heating instructions
« Reply #39 on: March 26, 2013, 09:34:10 PM »
Garvey will you freeze any of your dough? and then thaw and use it?  Or is it fresh and planning ahead for you?  Just wondering!  I respect your tastes!  Thanks.   
"My Doctor says I swallow a lot of aggression.  Along with a lot of pizzas!!"

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Re: Frozen Home Run Inn pizza heating instructions
« Reply #40 on: March 28, 2013, 08:37:50 PM »
I baked a HRI frozen Uncured Pepperoni Pizza tonight.  The bake was done at 410 degrees F for about 25 minutes.  There was still a gum-line in some areas of the pizza, but in some areas there wasn’t any gum-line.  The layers can be seen in the crust.  The bottom crust of the pizza didn’t brown very much.  The frozen pizza was defrosted all the way before the bake.

I weighed the HRI Uncured Pepperoni defrosted pizza before the bake and it weighed 1.125 oz., or 808 grams.  Right after the bake the HRI Uncured Pepperoni pizza weighed 1.103 oz., or 746 grams.

Since I ate a few slices cold now, I can notice the flaky layers more than when the pizza was first cut and still hot.

Norma

Offline CDNpielover

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Re: Frozen Home Run Inn pizza heating instructions
« Reply #41 on: March 28, 2013, 08:39:47 PM »
Norma, those are very good photos of the layers.  They look like the layers I had on my frozen HRI.   :chef:


Online norma427

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Re: Frozen Home Run Inn pizza heating instructions
« Reply #42 on: March 28, 2013, 08:48:57 PM »
Norma, those are very good photos of the layers.  They look like the layers I had on my frozen HRI.   :chef:

CDNpielover,

Good to hear the layers looked like the ones you had on your frozen HRI pizza.  Did you have any gum-line issues?

Norma

Offline CDNpielover

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Re: Frozen Home Run Inn pizza heating instructions
« Reply #43 on: March 28, 2013, 09:01:52 PM »
Norma, I did not notice, although I have to admit that I wasn't really looking as I've just recently learned what a gum line is!   :-[. When i get back to the states, I will have to pick up some more frozen HRI pizzas and see if I have a gum line.

Online norma427

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Re: Frozen Home Run Inn pizza heating instructions
« Reply #44 on: March 28, 2013, 09:20:21 PM »
Norma, I did not notice, although I have to admit that I wasn't really looking as I've just recently learned what a gum line is!   :-[. When i get back to the states, I will have to pick up some more frozen HRI pizzas and see if I have a gum line.

CDNpielover,

Lol, that is okay if recently discovered what a gum line was.  We all have to learn things. 

I wonder if Garvey or another member can bake a HRI frozen pizza without any gum lines.  Maybe I was baking wrong, but I did rotate the pizza while it was in the oven.

Norma

Offline mrmojo1

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Re: Frozen Home Run Inn pizza heating instructions
« Reply #45 on: March 28, 2013, 10:43:13 PM »
I always like a small gum line.....is it not suppose to have one?
"My Doctor says I swallow a lot of aggression.  Along with a lot of pizzas!!"

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Re: Frozen Home Run Inn pizza heating instructions
« Reply #46 on: March 29, 2013, 07:01:03 AM »
I always like a small gum line.....is it not suppose to have one?

Terry,

Since I never ate a real HRI pizza, I don’t know if the frozen HRI pizzas, or the real ones, are supposed to have gum lines.  When I posted the pictures of my HRI frozen cheese pizza at Reply 443 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6112.msg243681.html#msg243681 that pizza had more gum lines than the one I baked yesterday. 

Bob replied at 445 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6112.msg243696.html#msg243696 that my first HRI frozen pizza had some serious gum line issues going on.  That is what prompted me to email HRI about the gumminess under the cheese.

Norma

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Frozen Home Run Inn pizza heating instructions
« Reply #47 on: March 29, 2013, 09:38:47 AM »
Norma,

I am beginning to think that an HRI pizza is more prone to gum lines than other types of pizzas, and it may be more pronounced for the HRI pizzas made in its pizzerias than for the frozen HRI pizzas. I think part of the explanation has to do with the amount of "stuff" that is put on the HRI pizzas. For example, when I dissected one of the 12" HRI frozen pepperoni pizzas and weighed the pepperoni slices, the cheese and the sauce, the total weight was 14.64 ounces. Notably, the weight of the cheese alone was 10.33 ounces. Later, when I did the same thing with two 12" HRI sausage pizzas, which weigh about two ounces more than the pepperoni pizzas, the total weights of the cheese, sauce and sausage were 15.2 ounces and 15.52 ounces (see Reply 307 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6112.msg242492.html#msg242492). Remember, these weights were for pizzas that had already been partially baked and gave up some water content in the process. Also, it appears that some of the HRI frozen pizzas have more sauce than others. So, by my estimate, the above numbers may be a few percent on the low side.

If we now assume that the dough ball weight for a 12" HRI pizza is 15 ounces, which I deem to be a plausible number from my analysis, it can easily be seen from the above numbers, especially when they are adjusted for water loss during the par-bake, are higher than the weight of the dough itself. Even though the HRI dough is a sturdy and fairly dense dough (with its high oil content, low hydration value, and an estimated thickness factor of a bit over 0.13) and capable of holding everything that is put on it, I think these weights impose a burden on the way that the end pizza is baked, in terms of the type of oven used, the oven positioning, the type of carrier used (e.g., disk, cutter pan or their equivalent), bake temperature, and bake time. The balance between these factors has to be just right to be able to bake the crust to the right final color and to melt the cheese to the desired degree, and especially so if there is an above average amount of cheese on the skin. If there are a lot of toppings, these factors become even more critical because more things have to be baked. Under the circumstances, I can see how it might be easy to end up with a gum line. I don't think that it happens very often where what is put on a skin or crust for a flat profile pizza weighs more than the skin or crust itself. Maybe when this happens, a gum line is more probable.

As a cross check, I went to the Burke guide at Reply 4 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,14822.msg147190.html#msg147190 to check out typical amounts of cheese used on 12" pizzas. As can be seen there, a typical 12" pizza has a maximum Burke guide cheese quantity of 7.5 ounces. The HRI pepperoni pizza that I mentioned above had 10.33 ounces, and that weight was after some loss of water content. For sausage, the maximum Burke guide weight for a typical 12" pizza is 7.5 ounces for raw sausage and 5.75 ounces for cooked sausage. A typical, or generic, raw, fresh pork sausage contains about 56% water (http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/sausages-and-luncheon-meats/1375/2). On this basis, HRI appears to be above the Burke guide numbers, and in some cases perhaps considerably higher than the Burke guide numbers. In fact, HRI has said that it uses more sausage than what the USDA specifies as the minimum for pizza (see the article at Reply 9 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6009.msg51738.html#msg51738.

As a further cross check, the other day while I was at my local supermarket, I examined the Nutrition Facts for several types and brands of frozen pizzas. I was looking for numbers other than pizza weights but it seemed to me that most 12" frozen cheese and pepperoni pizzas weighed less than the HRI frozen pizzas. I didn't do a rigorous analysis but that was my impression. Even a 12" Papa John's pizza, whose dough skin has a comparable thickness factor, weighs less than a typical frozen HRI cheese pizza.

Peter

« Last Edit: March 29, 2013, 09:45:07 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Frozen Home Run Inn pizza heating instructions
« Reply #48 on: March 29, 2013, 10:18:22 AM »
I always like a small gum line.....is it not suppose to have one?
Terry,
When it comes to thin crust pizza making I have often heard many, many people express their disdain of the "dreaded gum line". It can definitely be difficult to avoid in certain pizza's.
I'm in your camp...a small gum line has never bothered me one bit.

Bob
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Online norma427

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Re: Frozen Home Run Inn pizza heating instructions
« Reply #49 on: March 29, 2013, 10:23:31 AM »
Norma,

I am beginning to think that an HRI pizza is more prone to gum lines than other types of pizzas, and it may be more pronounced for the HRI pizzas made in its pizzerias than for the frozen HRI pizzas. I think part of the explanation has to do with the amount of "stuff" that is put on the HRI pizzas. For example, when I dissected one of the 12" HRI frozen pepperoni pizzas and weighed the pepperoni slices, the cheese and the sauce, the total weight was 14.64 ounces. Notably, the weight of the cheese alone was 10.33 ounces. Later, when I did the same thing with two 12" HRI sausage pizzas, which weigh about two ounces more than the pepperoni pizzas, the total weights of the cheese, sauce and sausage were 15.2 ounces and 15.52 ounces (see Reply 307 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6112.msg242492.html#msg242492). Remember, these weights were for pizzas that had already been partially baked and gave up some water content in the process. Also, it appears that some of the HRI frozen pizzas have more sauce than others. So, by my estimate, the above numbers may be a few percent on the low side.

If we now assume that the dough ball weight for a 12" HRI pizza is 15 ounces, which I deem to be a plausible number from my analysis, it can easily be seen from the above numbers, especially when they are adjusted for water loss during the par-bake, are higher than the weight of the dough itself. Even though the HRI dough is a sturdy and fairly dense dough (with its high oil content, low hydration value, and an estimated thickness factor of a bit over 0.13) and capable of holding everything that is put on it, I think these weights impose a burden on the way that the end pizza is baked, in terms of the type of oven used, the oven positioning, the type of carrier used (e.g., disk, cutter pan or their equivalent), bake temperature, and bake time. The balance between these factors has to be just right to be able to bake the crust to the right final color and to melt the cheese to the desired degree, and especially so if there is an above average amount of cheese on the skin. If there are a lot of toppings, these factors become even more critical because more things have to be baked. Under the circumstances, I can see how it might be easy to end up with a gum line. I don't think that it happens very often where what is put on a skin or crust for a flat profile pizza weighs more than the skin or crust itself. Maybe when this happens, a gum line is more probable.

As a cross check, I went to the Burke guide at Reply 4 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,14822.msg147190.html#msg147190 to check out typical amounts of cheese used on 12" pizzas. As can be seen there, a typical 12" pizza has a maximum Burke guide cheese quantity of 7.5 ounces. The HRI pepperoni pizza that I mentioned above had 10.33 ounces, and that weight was after some loss of water content. For sausage, the maximum Burke guide weight for a typical 12" pizza is 7.5 ounces for raw sausage and 5.75 ounces for cooked sausage. A typical, or generic, raw, fresh pork sausage contains about 56% water (http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/sausages-and-luncheon-meats/1375/2). On this basis, HRI appears to be above the Burke guide numbers, and in some cases perhaps considerably higher than the Burke guide numbers. In fact, HRI has said that it uses more sausage than what the USDA specifies as the minimum for pizza (see the article at Reply 9 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6009.msg51738.html#msg51738.

As a further cross check, the other day while I was at my local supermarket, I examined the Nutrition Facts for several types and brands of frozen pizzas. I was looking for numbers other than pizza weights but it seemed to me that most 12" frozen cheese and pepperoni pizzas weighed less than the HRI frozen pizzas. I didn't do a rigorous analysis but that was my impression. Even a 12" Papa John's pizza, whose dough skin has a comparable thickness factor, weighs less than a typical frozen HRI cheese pizza.

Peter

Peter,

Thanks for explaining in detail why you are beginning to think that an HRI pizza is more prone to gum lines than other types of pizzas and explaining why.  It is interesting that you also think the gum lines might be more pronounced for the HRI pizzas made in it pizzerias.  I really don’t mind gum lines a lot, but rather not have them when eating any pizza.  I can see now from your post that HRI does use a lot of dressings for a base, or dough that doesn’t weigh a lot.   

After eating some of that frozen HRI Uncured Pepperoni pizza, I really can say honestly that I don’t see what is the hype about a frozen HRI pizza.  I might get get jabbed about that statement, but I like a pizza that has a lot more taste than a frozen HRI pizza does.  The crust didn’t really do anything for me even though parts of it were flaky.  It almost reminded me of eating a pie crust and the toppings were somewhat dry.  I know probably I didn’t bake right again, but I guess I must not be a fan of thin pizzas baked for a longer time at a lower temperature.  I know I never tasted a real HRI pizza fresh, so maybe my opinion might change if I had the chance to try one.

I did send another email to HRI.  This is what I said.

I baked a Home Run Inn bigger uncured pepperoni larger frozen pizza last night.  I did defrost the pizza first and baked the pizza at 410 degrees F.  It was good, but still had the gumminess under the sauce on part of the pizza and not on another part.  I did turn the pizza while it was in the oven a few times so it would bake right.  I wonder if pizzas at a Home Run Inn pizza really have that gumminess too and is that normal for your kind of pizza?  I  liked the flaky crust, which this time was more flakey than the last time I baked the frozen pizza.  Also I would like to know if you pizzas at your pizza business are that light on the bottom.  I am trying to bake your frozen pizzas the best I can, so that is why I am asking questions. 

I included a few photos.

Norma


 

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