Author Topic: The finished product! (Warning: Many pics. Dial-up users beware!)  (Read 2163 times)

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Offline UGAChemDawg

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Here is the dough after the 12 hour rise:
<img src="http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a175/InfiniteDomain/PizzaPics/pizzaprogress004.jpg" alt="Image hosted by Photobucket.com">

Here is the dough after I punched it:
<img src="http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a175/InfiniteDomain/PizzaPics/pizzaprogress006.jpg" alt="Image hosted by Photobucket.com">

Here are the ingredients that will be incorporated into the dressing (I ended up not using the tomatoes though because I ran out of room. The initial plan was to put tomato slices on top mainly for decorative purposes):
<img src="http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a175/InfiniteDomain/PizzaPics/pizzaprogress003.jpg" alt="Image hosted by Photobucket.com">

Here is the dough in the pan. This was BY FAR the most difficult part of the process. Getting it to fit in the pan even half way decently was a chore. Has anyone developed a convenient, systematic way to go about doing this?
<img src="http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a175/InfiniteDomain/PizzaPics/pizzaprogress007.jpg" alt="Image hosted by Photobucket.com">

The initial cheese layer:
<img src="http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a175/InfiniteDomain/PizzaPics/pizzaprogress008.jpg" alt="Image hosted by Photobucket.com">

Sauce layer applied after cheese:
<img src="http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a175/InfiniteDomain/PizzaPics/pizzaprogress009.jpg" alt="Image hosted by Photobucket.com">

Chopped onions on sauce:
<img src="http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a175/InfiniteDomain/PizzaPics/pizzaprogress010.jpg" alt="Image hosted by Photobucket.com">

Pepperoni layer on top of onions. Tobasco sauce was sprinkled on this layer:
<img src="http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a175/InfiniteDomain/PizzaPics/pizzaprogress011.jpg" alt="Image hosted by Photobucket.com">

Second cheese layer on top of pepperoni:
<img src="http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a175/InfiniteDomain/PizzaPics/pizzaprogress012.jpg" alt="Image hosted by Photobucket.com">

Final layer consisting of pepperoni and Jimmy Dean hot sausage:
<img src="http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a175/InfiniteDomain/PizzaPics/pizzaprogress013.jpg" alt="Image hosted by Photobucket.com">

Finished product:
<img src="http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a175/InfiniteDomain/PizzaPics/pizzaprogress015.jpg" alt="Image hosted by Photobucket.com">
<img src="http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a175/InfiniteDomain/PizzaPics/pizzaprogress018.jpg" alt="Image hosted by Photobucket.com">

Jimmy got scorched and the edges of the crust are burned, but this turned out to be only superficial damage. As you can see the sausage looks fine inside. Nevertheless, I now KNOW without any doubt my oven runs too hot. I baked it for 45 minutes at 450 degrees, figuring it would require more heat because of the additional layers:
<img src="http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a175/InfiniteDomain/PizzaPics/pizzaprogress025.jpg" alt="Image hosted by Photobucket.com">

One of the benefits of having the hardened (burned) crust was that it came out of the pan in one big chunk on a spatula and I was able to put it on a plate:
<img src="http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a175/InfiniteDomain/PizzaPics/pizzaprogress020.jpg" alt="Image hosted by Photobucket.com">

Despite the outside being burned, the inside was very runny. This was what disappointed me the most. Very watery on the inside. I couldnít even cut it properly because it was mushy when I put the knife in it. Stuff slides right off the pizza in a big, amorphous blob:
<img src="http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a175/InfiniteDomain/PizzaPics/pizzaprogress023.jpg" alt="Image hosted by Photobucket.com">

Here you can get a better idea of what Iím talking about. Notice how runny the insides are, rather than being held firm inside the pizza so you can pick it up and eat a slice without everything sliding off. It was way too watery on the inside:
<img src="http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a175/InfiniteDomain/PizzaPics/pizzaprogress026.jpg" alt="Image hosted by Photobucket.com">
<img src="http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a175/InfiniteDomain/PizzaPics/pizzaprogress022.jpg" alt="Image hosted by Photobucket.com">

Summary

Things I liked about it:

Right level of spiciness. I am very pleased with the flavor of the Tabasco and the Jimmy Dean.

Where it wasnít burnt, the dough was perfect. Excellent recipe! The dough on the bottom of the pie and the inside crust was perfect. The burns that you see in the picture are just superficial wounds. Underneath that, the dough is fine. Perfect taste, perfect texture.

Right amount of cheese.

Things I didnít like:

The nuking of the exterior.

The watery interior. This was probably caused by too much sauce. Next time, I will go easier on the sauce. I used the whole can in the picture of the dressing ingredients. I could have gotten away with half that. I did notice that the pizza settled down and I was able to eat it normally if I let it sit for about 20 minutes after it came out of the oven, rather than trying to cut it immediately. Even then, it was still too liquid though.

Too many onions. I used half an onion and chopped it up. A quarter onion probably would have been better. The onions were added for texture more so than for flavor.

Something about it tasted too sweet. I donít know if this was caused by the sauce or the onions. The sweetness clashed with the ďkickĒ that I was looking for. I would prefer a sauce that is not sweet and doesnít use sweet tasting tomatoes. I will check to see if the onions were sweet onions or not.

I donít think it was a bad job for a maiden voyage and I definitely learned some things. It goes without saying that there is much room for improvement, and improving is exactly what I plan to do.


Offline Steve

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Re: The finished product! (Warning: Many pics. Dial-up users beware!)
« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2006, 07:52:00 PM »
Here are some of my observations:

1. Not enough dough for the pan
2. You rolled out the dough before you put it in the pan... try putting the dough ball in the pan, then pressing it out using your fingertips.
3. Overcooked? Chicago pies are baked at lower temps for longer periods of time.

Good first attempt!!
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Offline Steve

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Re: The finished product! (Warning: Many pics. Dial-up users beware!)
« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2006, 07:54:12 PM »
Another tip... try, try, try to find some 6 in 1 brand tomatoes!  ;)
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Offline chiguy

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Re: The finished product! (Warning: Many pics. Dial-up users beware!)
« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2006, 08:09:22 PM »
 Hi UCAChemDawg,
Not a bad job at all for you're maiden voyage. I think the crust came out especially well, almoest perfect. Not a big surprise seeing that you used a Buzz recipe. I do not know how you measured it but it looked like the right amount of dough for you're pan. The sweetness you experienced is probably from the Ragu pizza sauce, which is really high in sugar. The Ragu also probably has a bit of added water which tends too cook out in the pizza during baking. The Ragu is probably not the most ideal sauce for deep dish. I would suggest trying 6/1s with a little parmesan, oregano & seasalt. If you are looking for a kick , how about a few cloves of chopped garlic. If you cannot get the 6/1s, you can use whole tomatoes and crush them down and drain the excess liquid and add the ingrediant's i mentioned above. As far as the burning of the top ingreidants, try placing them under the sauce, the sausage will cook just fine if they are not sliced to thick. Another option is too cover the pan with foil for the first half of baking. If you bake with foil for the entire baking time the pizza may develop puddles. Anyway, you are well on you're way to making the perfect deep dish.† † † † goodluck,† †Chiguy

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: The finished product! (Warning: Many pics. Dial-up users beware!)
« Reply #4 on: January 16, 2006, 08:35:17 PM »
UGAChemDawg,

Fortunately all the things you did wrong are fixable. Here are my comments and observations:

1) The dough appears to have been too wet. Next time, dust your work surface and your dough with flour and flatten the dough until it will hold together. If needed, add a bit more flour but as sparingly as possible--just enough to keep the dough a bit sticky but not wet. The dough can then be rolled out or pressed into the pan. I think you had enough dough for your pan since buzz's recipe is for a 9-inch pan. If you had a round skin, rather than an irregular one like yours, it should have fit the pan without ragged edges.†

2) You may want to follow a more orthodox method of layering your ingredients. What you did was to dress the pizza just like one would dress a flat pizza. I would start with the classical way of putting the cheese down first, followed by the toppings you plan to use, and end up with the sauce. If you want to use the sequence: cheese, some of the toppings, more cheese, more of the toppings, and sauce, that would be OK too. Until you develop your own style, you may want to stick with one layer of sauce for now. If you are using veggies, you should saute them first in a little bit of oil, to reduce the liquids they contribute to the pie. The amount of sauce to use on top is somewhat a matter of personal preference, but usually you need just enough to cover everything so that you can't see anything popping up through the sauce. I would also drain the sauce to remove excess liquid. I would do this even with a bottled pizza sauce.

3) I think you can now see why you can't put a lot of toppings directly on top of the pizza, especially at the temperature and for the time you baked your pizza. Most of the toppings should go below the sauce. I don't use raw sausage on my deep-dish but I suspect that it can be put just below the sauce. If you used it in little pieces, rather than slices, I would think that you could mix the pieces into the sauce. With experience, you will learn how much can be put into a pie without overloading it, and complicating the baking.

4) I suspect the sweetness you detected and did not like was due to your bottled sauce, not the onions. Since the onions were raw, they would not be particularly sweet. To get sweetness, you would have to caramelize them to release their natural sugars. You might want to look at the ingredient list on your bottled sauce. If it includes corn syrup or dextrose or any other form of sugar, that may be what you tasted. And the higher up on the list, the more predominant the sugar products would be and the more detectable.

5) Clearly, you baked your pizza too long. If in the future you see the crust browning too quickly, that is, before the sauce starts to bubble, you should put a sheet of aluminum foil over the pizza and check the pizza from time to time to see if it is done. Using the aluminum foil should keep the crust from overcooking. If you plan to use a lot of toppings, then you may also want to lower the oven temperature and bake the pizza longer so that everything can cook.

Peter


Offline UGAChemDawg

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Re: The finished product! (Warning: Many pics. Dial-up users beware!)
« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2006, 09:21:06 PM »
Thanks!

Question: How does one go about draining sauce?

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: The finished product! (Warning: Many pics. Dial-up users beware!)
« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2006, 10:30:22 PM »
UGAChemDawg,

I just put it through a fine sieve. I might add than not everyone drains their tomatoes. For example, the 6-in-1s that many members use for deep-dish are often put on the pizza right out of the can. I usually use a fair amount of veggies and I look for as many ways as possible to keep the dish dry, so I usually drain my tomatoes.

Peter

Offline canadianbacon

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Re: The finished product! (Warning: Many pics. Dial-up users beware!)
« Reply #7 on: January 16, 2006, 10:38:32 PM »
UGAChemDawg,

You have a good amount of stuff there for your pizza, and must have a lot left over, with that being
said, you should try and make another pizza this week, and see how it goes.

I look forward to seeing your next one, and I'm sure it will be great.

See how the first image of that dough looks ? ... if you had taken that dough like it was and had
put it into the pan like that, and then pressed it out with your hands gently, it would have been
pretty good, try that next time.  I think somebody suggested that though, so I guess I'm just echoing
their comments.

Anyway yeah, and keep your eye on the oven, things tend to burn when you are off watching a good show
on TV or whatnot  ;D ( don't ask, it's happened to me ) haha.

anyway, what's great about our hobby is that you can eat your mstakes, and start over again the
next day or the day after, and be proud of your even better results  :D

Mark
Pizzamaker, Rib Smoker, HomeBrewer, there's not enough time for a real job.

Offline buzz

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Re: The finished product! (Warning: Many pics. Dial-up users beware!)
« Reply #8 on: January 17, 2006, 11:19:27 AM »
Good experiment! Now try again!

Best to avoid bottled sauces--I have yet to find one that's any good. if you can't get 6-in-1, try other brands of supermarket crushed/ground tomatoes. They vary in terms of acidity and bitterness, so you'll just have to try a few. I've had good luck with Contadina and Progresso, but these vary from can to can. Muir Glen might be a good choice.

Go easy on the sauce--it looks like you have way too much.

450 is the right temperature, but you just cooked it too long. My oven takes around 40 minutes, but yours could run hotter. So until you learn how your oven behaves towards deep dishes, you'll just have to keep a constant eye on it. If you're putting that many toppings on, you might want to try par-baking the crust.

I don't know why you would have trouble getting the dough into the pan. You can either roll it out (to mimic the sheeter that Giordano's uses), or press it into the pan by hand (as Uno's does). It does look like you need a little more dough for the size of your pan. The dough should be thick enough so it doesn't tear, but not so thick that it turns out like a biscuit.

The dough after the 12-hour rise looks correct.


 

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