Author Topic: Sfincione  (Read 2501 times)

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Offline Johnny the Gent

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Sfincione
« on: April 01, 2013, 08:46:55 PM »
This wasn't supposed to be sfincione - but ended up as such. Well close to it. 90% bread flour (low protein here in Brasil) and 10% whole wheat.

Soft, spongy, with a nice crunch from the breadcrumbs up top.
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Online Pete-zza

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Re: Sfincione
« Reply #1 on: April 01, 2013, 08:51:30 PM »
Johnny the Gent,

Good to see you back after all these years. I hope that all is going well with you in Brazil.

It looks like you haven't lost your touch. Your sfincione looks great.

BTW, did you ever finish your legal studies?

Peter

Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Sfincione
« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2013, 09:06:10 PM »
Peter,
 
Thanks, it is nice to be back.

Things are going great- I graduated last year, got married and am making pizzas once a week ;-)

Over the years, I've had to consult your Lehman Roadmap post on several occasions, so I owe you a big THANKS!

J
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Offline dmcavanagh

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Re: Sfincione
« Reply #3 on: April 02, 2013, 03:32:36 PM »
Johnny, that's a thing of beauty, not enough people make or appreciate good sfincione. I sometimes will top mine with crushed Cheeze Its crackers in place of the bread crumbs, give it a try. The low-fat version are actually the best, for whatever reason they are crisper.

Offline Pizzaboyo

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Re: Sfincione
« Reply #4 on: April 02, 2013, 05:21:21 PM »
Man that looks great  :drool: any foolproof recipes for Sfincione?? and how do I pronounce it please?  :-[
An Irishman is never drunk as long as he can hold onto one blade of grass and not fall off the face of the earth.

Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Sfincione
« Reply #5 on: April 03, 2013, 11:16:59 PM »
Thanks dmcavanagh,

For this one, I took a piece of leftover sourdough that I made from a couple days before, and chopped it up in the blender. Hmm, not sure if I'm ready for Cheez it crackers on pizza, but I bet it came out tasty.

Thanks Pizzaboyo,

I didn't write this recipe down, but iirc it had 75% hydration. I used 3% homemade sourdough starter (from local grapes), and 2% salt. I let it slow rise overnight, but for the first couple hours I did a couple of stretch and folds.
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Offline Pizzaboyo

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Re: Sfincione
« Reply #6 on: April 04, 2013, 06:26:04 AM »
Thanks johnny but I said "Foolproof" you lost me at 3% homemade sourdough starter  :-[
An Irishman is never drunk as long as he can hold onto one blade of grass and not fall off the face of the earth.

Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Sfincione
« Reply #7 on: April 04, 2013, 02:22:46 PM »
Thanks johnny but I said "Foolproof" you lost me at 3% homemade sourdough starter  :-[

My bad Pizzaboyo.  :-\
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Offline Pizzaboyo

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Re: Sfincione
« Reply #8 on: April 04, 2013, 04:16:46 PM »
Might give this one a go if you think the recipe is OK

http://www.roma.ie/Recipes/Sfincione-34.aspx
An Irishman is never drunk as long as he can hold onto one blade of grass and not fall off the face of the earth.

Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Sfincione
« Reply #9 on: April 04, 2013, 07:07:24 PM »
I'll ask my e-friend from Palermo, Italy for a recipe. I'd like to make an authentic sfincione myself.

He did mention this about sfincione from Palermo:

A Palermo lo sfincione è fatto in un solo modo.. ma poi ci sono varianti che appartengono a paesi vicino a Palermo. Ad esempio c'è lo sfincione di Bagheria (8 km da Palermo).. Quello "DOC" è fatto solo a Palermo (e non ha tutti quegli alveoli)....

In Palermo sfincione is done only in a way .. but then there are variants which belong to countries near Palermo. For example, there sfincione Bagheria (8 km from Palermo) .. The "DOC" is just in Palermo (and does not have all those alveoli) ....


I think "alveoli" refers to the open air pockets in the dough, hopefully someone can chime in.
Il miglior fabbro


Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Sfincione
« Reply #10 on: April 06, 2013, 12:37:15 AM »
Might give this one a go if you think the recipe is OK

http://www.roma.ie/Recipes/Sfincione-34.aspx


Pizzaboyo - the recipe looks good to me - surely more authentic than my "it ended up as such" sfincione  ;D

If you decide to give it a go, I'd be curious to see what you think of it.

Later, J
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Offline Pizzaboyo

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Re: Sfincione
« Reply #11 on: April 06, 2013, 04:30:35 AM »
I'll keep you posted  :D
An Irishman is never drunk as long as he can hold onto one blade of grass and not fall off the face of the earth.

Online norma427

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Re: Sfincione
« Reply #12 on: April 06, 2013, 07:52:20 AM »

I think "alveoli" refers to the open air pockets in the dough, hopefully someone can chime in.


Johnny the Gent,

I do think "alveoli" refers to the how open the air pockets are in the dough.  I had a Sfincione thread I worked on for awhile.  I started with what I think was a Sfincione from a recipe from King Arthur and went from there.  The first Sfincione I made was very easy.  I really like your Sfincione.  I love to see those nice open alveoli.   :drool:

Norma
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Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Sfincione
« Reply #13 on: April 06, 2013, 08:13:00 AM »
Johnny the Gent,

I do think "alveoli" refers to the how open the air pockets are in the dough.  I had a Sfincione thread I worked on for awhile.  I started with what I think was a Sfincione from a recipe from King Arthur and went from there.  The first Sfincione I made was very easy.  I really like your Sfincione.  I love to see those nice open alveoli.   :drool:

Norma

Thanks for chiming in Norma. That makes sense. I know in an anatomical context, alveoli refers to the air sacs in the lungs. I came across your Sfincione thread, and that was what inspired me to try and make one.  It was a nice change of pace.

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Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Sfincione
« Reply #14 on: April 06, 2013, 08:39:28 AM »
For those interested, here's a link with a sfincione recipe: http://www.ricettedisicilia.net/piatti-unici/lo-sfincione-la-vera-pizza-dei-palermitani/  The guy that sent me this link was born and raised in Palermo, and is also a member of the Pizzarium group on facebook. He proudly states that "sfincione is the true pizza palermitano", and refers to it as "his pizza".  Here's the recipe translated (thanks to Google):


In ancient times, in Palermo, the peddler with his wheelbarrow recited the Sfincione with: "go tastalu! Scarsu r'ogghiu and Chinu the pruvulazzu "(assaggialo! Poor oil and full of the dust of the road), but today with the evolution of time, the wagon has become the" lapa "(the bike Ape Piaggio) and changed" the abbanniata "(the cry of the seller) in:" Who ciavuru! You colures u c 'has taliari! chisti sunnu so beautiful Vieru ra! "(That smell! Thou, the color you see, things are really nice!). The Sfincione is the Sicilian pizza and was typical of the Christmas holidays.

Born among the poor people to change the usual dish, represented by "schittu bread" (bread without any seasoning), on the occasion festive table presented in a suitable dish to that point.
The origin is probably Saracen while the name of "sfincione" is purely siculo. In fact, in our country, when you want to define something very soft is there a way to tell that defines it quite well: "It is muodda com 'na sfincia" (it is as soft as a "sfincia" - which is another product of Sicilian cuisine which we describe in the recipes of sweets and soft as that resembles the consistency of sfincione).
It seems that this delicacy was invented by the nuns of the monastery of San Vito di Palermo.
The recipe that we suggest undergoes small variations compared to the traditional one, because in my opinion it is much more digestible.
 
The recipe for a large baking pan (gives around 12 servings)
For the dough:
500 grams of flour, semolina (durum wheat)
500 grams of flour 0 (better yet manitoba flour)
half a liter of warm water
20 grams yeast
1 tablespoon of sugar
½ glass of olive oil
20 grams of salt

 
For the sauce:
500 grams of peeled tomatoes into large pieces
6 anchovies (rinse the salt or sardines in oil)
300 grams fresh cheese (to eat)
300 grams grated cheese semi fillets
Sale q.b
Fresh oregano
2 bunches of onions shallots
Procedure for the dough:
Put the sifted flour on a work surface and add the yeast chopped into small pieces with sugar.
Add a little warm water, mixing with his fists, until the mixture is fairly compact. At this point, start adding small amounts of salt on a work surface with a little warm water. Kneading, always with his fists, adding little by little the oil and turn over the dough on itself until you get a soft dough, elastic and well blended. At this point you will see the bubbles rising. Put the dough in an oiled bowl, cut the surface with two cross-cuts cover the bowl with plastic wrap, put it in a warm place covered with a woolen cloth and let rise for two hours (should double in volume).
Immediately after placing the mixture to rise, preheat the oven to 250/300 degrees.
Procedure for the sauce:
Put the tomatoes in a bowl and season with salt, pepper, onion (if using onion shallots cut into strips, if you use another type of onion cut thinly and put it to soak for about twenty minutes, with water and salt, then squeeze it and add it to the tomatoes), plenty of oil, and oregano, if you like, two teaspoons of sugar to remove the acidity of the tomato.
Oil the baking dish, sprinkle with breadcrumbs, stretching out the dough (it should be about an inch high). Sprinkle over the anchovies into small pieces, the fresh cheese cut into squares (about ½ cm thick). With a ladle cover sfincione with the sauce before. Sprinkle with grated cheese and finally the breadcrumbs. Press down lightly with a spoon so that the breadcrumbs absorb the moisture of the sauce (and therefore does not burn). Drizzle with a little olive oil and let rise for at least ½ hour, then bake for about twenty minutes checking the stages of cooking.
Serve hot sprinkled with fresh oregano. It is also delicious warm or cold.
Il miglior fabbro

Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Sfincione
« Reply #15 on: July 27, 2013, 05:21:19 PM »
I picked up some flour from the neighborhood bakery this morning. The baker told me that the flour comes from Argentina, and the 50kilo sack is labeled as "Farinha especial para panificação tipo 000 " (type 000 flour, special for bakeries). It felt super fine through my fingers.  I made a dough with only 63% hydration, and it felt like 75%, if that makes any sense.  (keeping in mind I'm used to working with AP flour, at approximately 9.8% protein) A wet dough, but still manageable, especially after a few stretch and folds. 

To the sauce - After the onions were sufficiently caramalized to my liking, I added a couple anchovy filets and let them liquify and flavor the onions.  I then added a couple fresh peeled tomatoes (peeled and pulsed prior), along with a splash of balsamic vinegar, pinch of sugar and oregano - no salt, the anchovy fillets had plenty. I let it simmer until the sauce reduced and thickened.  Once cooled, the sauce was spread over the dough, followed by more diced anchovies, then a light sprinkling of Spanich sheep's milk Queso Manchego. Lastly, some breadcrumbs- which were lightly pressed into the sauce ( to prevent burning ). I had a couple spoonfuls of sauce left over, so I laid on a couple thin stripes.

Great oven spring, open texture (certainly too open of a crumb for the sfincione purists), and a nice contrast of savory, sweet and salty flavors topside - overall, a very nice afternoon snack.
Il miglior fabbro


 

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