Author Topic: Peter - Is there a version of Randy's recipe that can be used for a 10" screen?  (Read 2518 times)

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Offline UGAChemDawg

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Peter,

Would you please make me a version of the thin version of Randy's American style dough recipe that is scaled to fit into a 10 inch pizza screen? This is simply because that is the size screen I ordered online and I will make this when it comes in. I think the original recipe was for a 12 inch screen.

Thanks,

Mike


Online Pete-zza

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Mike,

Let me know what flour you plan to use, and I will give you the formulation. My recollection is that I made thin versions using high-gluten flour (KASL) and all-purpose flour. It is also possible to use bread flour if you'd like.

Peter

Offline UGAChemDawg

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Mike,

Let me know what flour you plan to use, and I will give you the formulation. My recollection is that I made thin versions using high-gluten flour (KASL) and all-purpose flour. It is also possible to use bread flour if you'd like.

Peter

All purpose

Thanks!

Online Pete-zza

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UGAChemDawg:

Here it is:

UGAChemDawg’s 10-Inch Thin Version of Randy’s American Style Pizza Dough
100%, All-purpose flour (Gold Medal), 4.63 oz. (131.09 g.), 1 c. + 2 T. + 2 t.
60%, Water (at 72 degrees F), 2.77 oz. (78.66 g.), between 1/4 and 3/8 c.
2.0%, Sugar (ordinary table sugar), 0.09 oz. (2.62 g.), 5/8 t.
3%, Honey, 0.14 oz. (3.93 g.), a bit over 1/2 t.
2.8%, Vegetable oil, 0.13 oz. (3.67 g.), a bit over 3/4 t.
1.65%, Salt (ordinary table salt), 0.08 oz. (2.16 g.), a bit over 3/8 t.
0.40%, IDY (SAF Red), 0.02 oz. (0.52 g.), a bit less than 1/4 t.
Thickness factor (TF) = 0.10
Finished dough weight = 7.85 oz. (222.66 g.)

Since you will be using volume measurements rather than weights, to get close on the flour you will want to use the method I use to measure out the flour. I start by stirring the flour in the flour bag to loosen it a bit. I then use a standard kitchen tablespoon and lift the flour into the measuring cup/spoons. I don’t shake or tamp the measuring cup. I then level off the tops of the measuring cup/spoons using the flat edge of a knife. Since flours differ, you won’t get exactly the same amount of flour as I measured out, but you should be pretty close. You also don't have to use the same flour I used, or the same brand of yeast, etc. Whatever you have on hand should work fine.

As background for making the dough, you will want to look at Reply #20 and the related Reply #8 at this thread: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1707.0.html. Except as noted, both of these posts describe thin versions of Randy’s American style dough using Randy’s instructions given at Reply # 5. Since you will be making a much smaller amount of dough than I used, your knead times can be less than recited for the formulations I used for the doughs I described in Replies 8 and 20. In fact, the amount of dough is small enough that you can make it by hand if you’d like. You also won’t need as long a bake time since your pizza will be smaller and will bake faster than a bigger one. It’s just the laws of physics and thermodynamics.

If you have questions before embarking on your new journey, feel free to pose them as you wish.

Peter