Author Topic: When cooking - dough will not rise  (Read 1038 times)

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Offline sammybotz

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When cooking - dough will not rise
« on: April 06, 2013, 09:21:03 AM »
I used the below flour (link) and recipe to make pizza dough. Problem is I only had a cookie sheet (not a pizza pan) and it seems the dough stayed very thin when finished after 20 minutes cooking time. The bottom was crispy golden and it did not sag when picking it up, just very, very thin. It did rise when I did the beginning process with the yeast and all. Just wondering if I can get the dough to rise a bit more during the cooking process.

Thanks for any advise.


My flour (Montana Spring - Wheat specification: Hard Spring Wheat) :
http://www.philforemost.com/flour/hard_wheat.htm

=============================
    1 teaspoon white sugar

    1 1/2 cups warm water (110 degrees F/45 degrees C)

    1 tablespoon active dry yeast

    1 tablespoon olive oil

    1 teaspoon salt

    3 1/4 cups whole wheat flour

=====================================

Directions

In a large bowl, dissolve sugar in warm water. Sprinkle yeast over the top, and let stand for about 10 minutes, until foamy.


Stir the olive oil and salt into the yeast mixture, then mix in the whole wheat flour and 1 cup of the all-purpose flour until dough starts to come together. Tip dough out onto a surface floured with the remaining all-purpose flour, and knead until all of the flour has been absorbed, and the ball of dough becomes smooth, about 10 minutes. Place dough in an oiled bowl, and turn to coat the surface. Cover loosely with a towel, and let stand in a warm place until doubled in size, about 1 hour.


When the dough is doubled, tip the dough out onto a lightly floured surface, and divide into 2 pieces for 2 thin crust, or leave whole to make one thick crust. Form into a tight ball. Let rise for about 45 minutes, until doubled.

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F (220 degrees C). Roll a ball of dough with a rolling pin until it will not stretch any further. Then, drape it over both of your fists, and gently pull the edges outward, while rotating the crust. When the circle has reached the desired size, place on a well oiled pizza pan. Top pizza with your favorite toppings, such as sauce, cheese, meats, or vegetables.


Bake for 16 to 20 minutes (depending on thickness) in the preheated oven, until the crust is crisp and golden at the edges, and cheese is melted on the top.
======================


Offline TXCraig1

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Re: When cooking - dough will not rise
« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2013, 09:43:43 AM »
I suspect the rolling pin is the culprit. It's fine for a cracker rust, but if you want a nice rise in your crust, you should be as gentle as possible with the dough.

Picture the little bubbles in the dough formed by the CO2 the yeast give off. This is what causes the dough to rise outside the oven. These little bubbles are also the structure that catches rapidly expanding steam as the dough bakes and gives you "oven spring" or the rise inside the oven. Now picture what the rolling pin is doing to all the little bubbles.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline sammybotz

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Re: When cooking - dough will not rise
« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2013, 09:48:51 AM »
Thanks for the tip. I shall try doing it without the rolling pin.

Also I just have a cookie sheet. Do you think getting a pizza screen will help anything?

I am visiting the Philippines and cannot get a pizza stone at this time. Thanks again for your response.

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: When cooking - dough will not rise
« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2013, 10:10:29 AM »
Thanks for the tip. I shall try doing it without the rolling pin.

Also I just have a cookie sheet. Do you think getting a pizza screen will help anything?

I am visiting the Philippines and cannot get a pizza stone at this time. Thanks again for your response.

You might like the texture of the crust better on a screen, but it probably won't affect the rise much.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline sammybotz

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Re: When cooking - dough will not rise
« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2013, 10:13:36 AM »
Got it, thanks so much for your help. I'll let you know how it turns out when I make it. Have a nice day.

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Re: When cooking - dough will not rise
« Reply #5 on: April 12, 2013, 11:52:38 AM »
Sammy;
Also keep in mind that whole-wheat flour does not rise as well as regular white flour does. Think of it like this, whole-wheat flour is actually a blend of 80% white flour and 20% wheat bran (fiber), since only the white flour portion can develop gluten it is the portion that rises, the bran portion is just carried along for the ride. Also, the bran particles have a cutting effect upon the gluten structure resulting in a dough that is somewhat less capable of holding gas resulting in a lower rise than what you would normally get with a regular white flour dough.
If you can, open the dough up by hand rather than using a rolling pin, and then allow the dough to rise for at least 30-minutes between fitting the dough to the pan and dressing/baking it. This should help get you on track to a thicker crust.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline sammybotz

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Re: When cooking - dough will not rise
« Reply #6 on: April 12, 2013, 12:20:45 PM »
Thanks for this tip Tom "allow the dough to rise for at least 30-minutes between fitting the dough to the pan and dressing/baking it".
That should help make the dough rise a bit. I also did not roll the dough with a pin and it helped as Craig and you has suggested. Thank you both for that tip. I have to cook them at my highest temperature on this new home oven which is 240C = 464.00F for 25 minutes. Seems like I'm getting there but now I want to have an oven built. I am in a Jungle type situation a bit here and limited on quality restaurant equipment.

I found a place that can build cheap propane tank powered ovens. I just want it to hold up long enough to save money for a regular pizza oven shipped from Manila but too much for me right now. So I have some ideas for this new oven maybe you Gentlemen can help me with. I will attach an image of one oven they did for another customer (it's a bad scratched up picture). And also I found some stones (8" X 4" X 2 1/2" height) in the local hardware store. I was thinking of lining up the bottom of the new home built oven with these stones and try to cook pizza directly on it. I can have them build the interior size of the pizza deck to be 18" X 3' so I can cook (2) 16" pizza's side by side at the same time. I'm just winging it here and guessing so some professional advise would be highly appreciated. Images attached and please tell me your thoughts. Thanks for all the help.

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Re: When cooking - dough will not rise
« Reply #7 on: April 17, 2013, 11:46:42 AM »
Sammy;
Rather than going with gas, can you go with a wood fired oven? There are some excellent plans available for building your own, so with some local contractor assistance I'm thinking you might be able to get a first class pizza oven at a fraction of the cost of a commercial one. Just a thought.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor


 

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