Author Topic: Newbie wood question  (Read 705 times)

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Offline sleepnbag

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Newbie wood question
« on: April 10, 2013, 11:23:53 PM »
OK, pardon my ignorance (not sure where to post this question) ..but what kind of wood are you all using in your wood fired ovens? ..or do you just use charcoal?
..oak?


Offline BrickStoneOven

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Re: Newbie wood question
« Reply #1 on: April 10, 2013, 11:26:59 PM »
As long as its hard, dry and doesnt have sap you're good to go.
« Last Edit: April 11, 2013, 10:29:28 AM by BrickStoneOven »

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Newbie wood question
« Reply #2 on: April 10, 2013, 11:30:43 PM »
Oak is likely to be the best BTU/$ option for most people.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Newbie wood question
« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2013, 08:55:40 AM »
Oak and mesquite.

Offline wheelman

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Re: Newbie wood question
« Reply #4 on: April 11, 2013, 09:59:13 AM »
oak, hickory and pecan.  all that really matters though is that it's dry. 

Offline ccgus

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Re: Newbie wood question
« Reply #5 on: April 11, 2013, 04:06:53 PM »
all that really matters though is that it's dry.

I use fir to warm up my WFO, and then switch to apple for baking the pies.  Why not keep on using fir?  Because it pops like crazy, and I'd rather not have little bits of ember all over my pies.  Apple (and other hardwoods I assume) don't have this problem in my experience.  So dry hardwood is best for the actual bake- use dry whatever beforehand.

Offline weemis

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Re: Newbie wood question
« Reply #6 on: April 12, 2013, 12:55:55 PM »
I don't make a big deal about what kind of wood it is unless i'm buying it (which i don't). Pretty much any hard wood that is free works for me (soft woods (mostly pine) can cause creosote build-up in your smoke stack that can cause fires if you aren't careful). The problem comes that some woods burn to ash pretty quickly, leaving little substance for the coal bed. I learned this with my silver maple stash. Currently, I'm finding more wood for free than I can use, so I've been getting pickier and taking mostly locust, oak and ash. They seem to work well and are common in my area, though they can be quite a chore to split.

So you'll get heat out of all of em, but for buying wood already split, stick to the highest BTU wood available in your area.
Nick Gore - just a dough eyed wanderer

Offline breadstoneovens

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Re: Newbie wood question
« Reply #7 on: April 12, 2013, 10:12:14 PM »
My advice is to use tree trimmings from hard wood such as oak, maple, ash, ...
It is often free, seasons in just 6 month and no need to split it.

Antoine
WFO cooking is about passion.