Author Topic: Air Bubbles and rising  (Read 824 times)

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Offline Rick M

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Air Bubbles and rising
« on: April 13, 2013, 11:38:23 AM »
Doc,

If you don't mind, can you take a look at my work flow of making Neapolitan dough.  I seem to be consistently over raising the dough. 

62.5 % hydration
.20 IDY
2.8 Salt
255 gram balls

68 degree water, I hold back just back a cup of water   Mix yeast into water and add it to my  Mecnosud IM8 Spiral mixer.  Put flour into bowl and mix, as it starts to mix I add all the salt.
About 6 minutes later, I do an autolyse for 20 minutes.  Add the additional of flour, once it starts mixing I add that cup of water from earlier because it seems so dry.  Mix for approx. 7-10 minutes.  Onto the kitchen table, knead it a few times, rest for 5 minutes, knead it again 2-4 times.  Bulk ferment in basement in my small artisan dough tray with a second tray on top acting as a lid at 60 degrees for 12 hours.  Bring it up in the morning, and it  completely takes up all four side of the dough tray.  Scape out, (this is the questionable part) and knead it again a few time to make it smaller and manageable.  Cut it into balls and into the doug trays.  (At this point, I could already see air bubbles on top of the balls I just rolled) into the fridge at 40 degrees for 24 hours.  Last time I made dough I had taken the treys out 6-8 hours before baking, next time I will look and them and decide if they need that much time to rise more or less.  The pies taste good, but they are hard to work with.  Next time I will follow with pictures.

Do you think anything is way out of the ordinary in my work flow? 

Any reason for the air bubbles forming so quickly?

Thanks,

Rick M
« Last Edit: April 14, 2013, 08:43:11 PM by Rick M »
It was love at first Slice!


Offline Rick M

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Re: Air Bubbles and rising
« Reply #1 on: April 14, 2013, 08:59:00 PM »
Well here's my next batch, I might have found the sweet spot.   A little less yeast, .17 instead of .20 and mixed a little longer.   The top pic is still in the cold ferment stage.  I'll pull that out of the frig a few hours before bake.  The bottom pic is, I dont know what to say, a little too much yeast, under mixed, ????.   
« Last Edit: April 14, 2013, 09:07:43 PM by Rick M »
It was love at first Slice!

Offline jeff v

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Re: Air Bubbles and rising
« Reply #2 on: April 14, 2013, 11:38:18 PM »
.20 sounds like too much yeast. Especially given your longer knead in the mixer followed by the hand kneading. That could warm up the dough and really get the yeast going and 60 degrees for 12 hrs won't slow it down much before refrigeration. Why don't you go right into the fridge?

That's probably also why you feel you the need to knead after bulk fermentation before balling. I try to only gently degas the dough after bulk fermentation.

Lastly, how are you measuring your yeast?
Back to being a civilian pizza maker only.

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Air Bubbles and rising
« Reply #3 on: April 15, 2013, 07:50:08 AM »
Rick;
I'm in agreement with Jeff V.
I would take the dough directly to the fridge right after the final kneading, then cut into dough balls, lightly oil the dough balls and place back into the fridge for an onernight cold ferment, then out a few hours on the following day before you open them into pizza skins.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline Rick M

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Re: Air Bubbles and rising
« Reply #4 on: April 15, 2013, 09:32:17 PM »
Jeff,

I have a digital scale, but when you're measuring 3.5 - 4.2 gram range, it's hard to be spot on, my scale reads either 3 or 4.  It really comes down to reading the dough, if you get to stage that it starts to blow, there's no turning back.   Put into the fridge a little earlier like you said and you can make up for it by leaving it out longer to rise.   This is my assumption here, I am very new to this dough thing!!  Eating it has always been my specialty.   

Rick
« Last Edit: April 16, 2013, 08:56:32 AM by Rick M »
It was love at first Slice!