Author Topic: Numero 28 on Carmine Street, NYC  (Read 3313 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline varasano

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 712
  • Location: Atlanta (Bronx born and raised)
  • Seeking perfection
Numero 28 on Carmine Street, NYC
« on: December 29, 2005, 11:05:05 PM »
This is a new place located one  block from the famous Joe's Pizza (which was the location of the opening scene of Spiderman 2). Numero 28 is on Carmine, just south of Bleeker.

The owner/chef told me he's a 4th generation pizza maker from Naples and he's on been in the U.S. for 2 months.

Overall, the pizza was good but not spectacular.  He had a lot of the right elements, but the big problem was that the pie was too thick and a bit gummy.  I talked to him for a while. Here's the basics, directly from him:

-Caputo Pizzeria Flour,
-24 hour warm rise, but will put it in the fridge a bit as needed to delay the rise.
-He uses only a sourdough culture and no baker's yeast. 
-He said it was 90 seconds in the oven, but I didn't time it.

My observations
-small woodburning oven, no door
-Very simple sauce - probably just tomatoes. Crushed with some lumps.  Simple and nice but a bit bland.
-He spread the dough by pounding on it quite a bit and stretching it on a floured marble surface. He didn't hold it much or stretch it much with this knucles. 
-The dough showed little potential for windowpaning. It's a bit hard to tell, because he was not trying to stretch it paper thin, but from my experience, it would have ripped had he pushed it too far.  I mentioned that mine it a bit thinner, and he said that in Naples it's thicker like his.  Hmmm. 
-The dough had a nice char on the bottom, but the heat was not balanced. The top was too raw and blonde.
-The dough was flavorful, but too thick and gummy.  When you have very high heat, and the pie is thick, the inside of the dough can be a little uncooked. This is what happened. It was pretty obvious. If he fixes this, the place could be much better.
The crust had a nice spring, but was really uncooked inside and thus it didn't have many bubbles or big holes.  Much of it was left on the plate.
-There were lots of topping choices
-The cheese was excellent - bubbling without burning nor breaking down, the way that my Atlanta cheese always does. I should have asked him where he gets it.

Overall, I'd give this a 7. My guest, who's been to all the top places too, was not as generous.  But I think that there was really just that one problem. But it was major and did hurt the experience. 

Ciao,

Jeff
« Last Edit: December 29, 2005, 11:08:30 PM by varasano »


Offline Bill/SFNM

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4042
  • Location: Santa Fe, NM
Re: Numero 28 on Carmine Street, NYC
« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2005, 06:16:40 AM »

-small woodburning oven


Jeff,

Somewhere I heard  that commercial wood-burning ovens in NYC were prohibitively expensive due to clean-air regs that require scrubbers to reduce emissions.  I guess I heard wrong.

Bill/SFNM

Online Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 22322
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Numero 28 on Carmine Street, NYC
« Reply #2 on: December 30, 2005, 09:13:05 AM »
Bill,

You may still be right. I remember a few years ago reading all the work that Blue Smoke, a BBQ restaurant in Manhattan, went through to be able to build the restaurant in a city location. I found an article that discussed the problems, and here is an excerpt:

In New York a restaurant is not allowed to vent wood smoke and gas-fired emissions through the same flue.... As a result, Blue Smoke's twin custom-built Ole Hickory Pits smokers had to be vented separately. An elaborate and costly system of aluminum ducts was constructed to draw the smoke out of the kitchen and up 15 stories beyond the roof of the East 27th Street high-rise.

Peter

Offline scott r

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3075
  • Age: 43
  • Location: boston
  • I Love Pizzafreaks!
Re: Numero 28 on Carmine Street, NYC
« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2005, 02:42:31 PM »
I found that in Naples there was a substantial difference in thickness between pies produced at different pizzerias.  In the end I think all the pies would be classified as thin crust.  The thinnest would be something like a Patsy's thickness, but I only found it to be that thin at one pizzeria.   None of the pies I tried over there were gummy or overly moist.  I have run into similar problems in my home oven and have had to decrease the hydration.  It sounds like Numero Uno is using a Da Michele type high hydration dough, but does not have an oven built well enough to deal with the extra water in the dough. 

Offline PizzaBrewer

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 268
  • Location: Relocating my brewpub/pizzeria within NE Pennsylvania...
  • Seasoned pro Brewer, intermediate pro Pizzamaker
Re: Numero 28 on Carmine Street, NYC
« Reply #4 on: December 30, 2005, 03:31:37 PM »
Jeff:  How were the prices?  Esp. compared to UPA?

Thanks!

---Guy
Man does not live by bread alone.  There's also tomato, cheese and pepperoni.

Offline canadave

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 666
  • Age: 43
  • Location: Beach Meadows, NS, Canada, Earth
Re: Numero 28 on Carmine Street, NYC
« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2005, 12:50:38 AM »
Jeff,

Thanks for alerting us to this new place.  I lived a block away from there for my entire life (on 6th Avenue between Bleecker and Houston).  Of course I was a regular at Joe's....you could find me there just about every day of the week.

I'm planning a trip back home to see my folks (who still live at my old address) in May, so hopefully I'll get a chance to check it out.

--Dave

Offline canadave

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 666
  • Age: 43
  • Location: Beach Meadows, NS, Canada, Earth
Re: Numero 28 on Carmine Street, NYC
« Reply #6 on: December 31, 2005, 01:00:10 AM »
I also wonder how this new pizzeria can survive when old Giuseppe ("Joe," to everyone in our neighbourhood) couldn't keep Joe's going--he had to close it down because the landlord wanted a ridiculous rent increase (I think up to $16,000 or something crazy like that).  Not knowing exactly where Numero 28 is, still I'd think the rent there would be similar if it's close by.

Dave

Offline canadave

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 666
  • Age: 43
  • Location: Beach Meadows, NS, Canada, Earth
Re: Numero 28 on Carmine Street, NYC
« Reply #7 on: December 31, 2005, 01:05:15 AM »
Found an article about Numero 28 on The Gothamist:
http://www.gothamist.com/archives/2005/01/12/naples_in_new_york_numero_28_pizzeria_joins_the_fray.php

Incidentally, just to make a minor correction for anyone going there--Numero 28 is on Carmine between Bleecker and Bedford, which is *west* of Bleecker, not south as Jeff originally posted.

Dave
« Last Edit: December 31, 2005, 04:40:45 AM by canadave »

Offline David

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 966
  • What’s So Funny ‘Bout Pizza Love and Understanding
Re: Numero 28 on Carmine Street, NYC
« Reply #8 on: February 22, 2006, 06:27:01 PM »
Numero 28 is on Carmine, just south of Bleeker.

The owner/chef told me he's a 4th generation pizza maker from Naples and he's on been in the U.S. for 2 months.

Ciao,

Jeff


I was there recently and he told me he was a member of the family that own the famous Trianon Pizzeria in Naples.He also said that he had previously owned and sold  L'Asso (see link)?

http://www.downtownexpress.com/de_83/homemadepizza.html
If you're looking for a date... go to the Supermarket.If you're looking for a wife....go to the Farmers market

Offline pizzanapoletana

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 958
  • Location: London -UK
  • Pizza Napoletana as it was made in 1730!
    • Forno Napoletano - Pizza Ovens
Re: Numero 28 on Carmine Street, NYC
« Reply #9 on: February 23, 2006, 05:18:43 PM »
David,

No this guy again....

I was censored on e-gullet when I told the story of my conversation with this guy, so I won't add any comment apart of facts I know and/or I observed whilst talking to him at L'asso:

He is from Marcianise , near Caserta, still Campania, but no Naples.

He is not related to any famous Pizzeria in Naples and he even told me that was related to both Da Michele and Trianon that in fact do not have any connection.

He doesn't even know how to flatten the dough Neapolitan style. He was using a rolling pin, and Il Pizzaiolo witness with me to this.

I did not taste the pizza, but those did not look Neapolitan.

Finally, I know his mozzarella supplier and he does use great Bufalo Mozzarella.


 

pizzapan