Author Topic: Dough Retarding/Proofing Pans  (Read 3018 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline mzshan

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 47
  • I Love Pizza!
Dough Retarding/Proofing Pans
« on: April 09, 2007, 05:12:20 PM »
Hey fellas. I will admit I fell in love for NY style pizza actually by thier impersonaters down in orlando florida which is my home away from home. I currently live in toronto, which is alot closer to NYC then it is to orlando.. how ever Every 2 times a year you will catch me in orlando at one of my fav high school days pizza joint claiming to be REAL NY STYLE PIZZARIA.. I being a cook my self working for Marriott hotels I like to eventually run my own pizzaria restaurant and possibly retire from it like the Great DOM. I also worked at a couple of pizzaria chains as well as a couple of italian restaurants who did pizza here in toronto. All i must say none of them come close to brining the taste in pizza as i have experienced in past Pizzarias. I am trying to crack the secerets too and will eventually visit NYC Pizza places soon.
Today i come to you from what i saw on my recent trip to some pizzaria's in orlando and miami florida. they use
ALUMINUM DOUGH RETARDING/PROFING PANS: here is the link. http://www.abestkitchen.com/store/pizzapans.html 4th item down. Also they use flour distributed through a company called Roma food www.ROMAFOOD.com which supplies a High Gluten Flour and Sauce base the name is Assoluti! tried doing research on them nothing comes  up as far as company. What i like to know has anyone tried proofing dough in aluminum pans, I hear alot of talk about plastic containers with air tight lids.??


SHAN
 


Offline Art

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 225
  • Age: 67
  • Location: Hoschton, GA
  • la pizza la mia vita!!
Re: Dough Retarding/Proofing Pans
« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2007, 05:24:19 PM »
These appear to be the same proofing pans I purchased in January from Zesco. I like them a lot. I spray them with olive oil and cover the dough lightly with plastic wrap. I usually leave the dough in the fridge for 3-5 days before using and it has always been perfect. They stack well so you only really need 1 lid. Here's the link http://www.zesco.com/products.cfm?subCatID=1652&PGroupID=020206MZ01
When baking, follow directions.  When cooking, go by your own taste.

Offline Steve

  • Steve Zinski
  • Administrator
  • *
  • Posts: 1910
  • Age: 50
  • Location: Richmond, VA
    • pizzamaking.com
Re: Dough Retarding/Proofing Pans
« Reply #2 on: April 10, 2013, 11:52:09 AM »
These appear to be the same proofing pans I purchased in January from Zesco. I like them a lot. I spray them with olive oil and cover the dough lightly with plastic wrap. I usually leave the dough in the fridge for 3-5 days before using and it has always been perfect. They stack well so you only really need 1 lid. Here's the link http://www.zesco.com/products.cfm?subCatID=1652&PGroupID=020206MZ01


I know this is an old topic, but I just bought some of the Zesco pans and hate them. I've tried olive oil but the dough sticks to the pan and is very difficult to remove.
Pizzamaking.com is a member-supported public resource. Click HERE to become a Supporting Member.

Offline Art

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 225
  • Age: 67
  • Location: Hoschton, GA
  • la pizza la mia vita!!
Re: Dough Retarding/Proofing Pans
« Reply #3 on: April 10, 2013, 12:37:51 PM »
I know this is an old topic, but I just bought some of the Zesco pans and hate them. I've tried olive oil but the dough sticks to the pan and is very difficult to remove.

Six years later and I'm still using the same pans and I've NEVER had a problem. Same goes for my son-in-law and granddaughter. Either the pans have changed or our doughs are somehow different. Don't know what else to say.  :-\. Art
When baking, follow directions.  When cooking, go by your own taste.

Offline bradtri

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 134
Re: Dough Retarding/Proofing Pans
« Reply #4 on: April 10, 2013, 08:56:50 PM »
Steve,
   Do you reball your dough after taking out of the fridge?  I proof my dough in the fridge for 4-8 days in Gladware bowls.  Then, remove from fridge for 1 hour at room temp, remove dough and reball and spray cooking spray in the bottom of the bowl before putting ball back in for a 2-4 hour room temp rest.  To use, I just turn the bowl upside down and set it on a floured surface and the dough comes out by itself in just a few seconds.  I would imagine it would be very similar with the aluminum pans.

   Just for giggles, one time I tried inverting my bowl of doughs without reballing.  It took a minute or two, but eventually the dough released and came out.  For this method, more patience is definitely required, but I found I could just invert all my bowls up front and then the dough was already out on its own as I would get to each bowl.

Offline Steve

  • Steve Zinski
  • Administrator
  • *
  • Posts: 1910
  • Age: 50
  • Location: Richmond, VA
    • pizzamaking.com
Re: Dough Retarding/Proofing Pans
« Reply #5 on: April 13, 2013, 11:48:11 AM »
I don't reball my dough. I mix, knead, ball, rise/ripen, shape, then bake.

I usually put my dough balls in a 1-gallon Zip-Loc bag and let ripen for two days in the refrigerator. Then I carefully cut the bag open, flip the dough onto a floured surface, then press/stretch/shape the dough. This way the dough is always fully relaxed and doesn't fight back or tear.

So, I tried these dough pans and it takes me literally 5 minutes to get each dough ball out because it sticks and I have to be gentle and coax the dough out so it will remain relaxed.

I'm going back to the ZipLoc bags or going to try a large dough proofing tray.
Pizzamaking.com is a member-supported public resource. Click HERE to become a Supporting Member.


 

pizzapan