Author Topic: Honey in Sauce  (Read 1959 times)

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Offline dmcavanagh

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Honey in Sauce
« on: July 22, 2011, 07:57:06 PM »
I know a lot of people cringe at the thought of using sugar in tomato sauce, but the other day I was making a batch of sauce that was just to acidic, so I added a good dose of honey and it smoothed it right out!


Online Tscarborough

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Re: Honey in Sauce
« Reply #1 on: July 25, 2011, 05:05:44 PM »
I always use sugar (of some sort) in my sauce with canned tomatoes, cooked or uncooked, along with salt.  They are both required to balance the flavors.

Offline chickenparm

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Re: Honey in Sauce
« Reply #2 on: July 27, 2011, 04:52:27 PM »
Never tried it but sounds like a good experiment I would like to try.
 :)
-Bill

Offline anton-luigi

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Re: Honey in Sauce
« Reply #3 on: July 09, 2012, 03:42:05 PM »
only thing in my pizza sauce is san marzano tomatoes, basil, sea salt, and honey.  :)

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Honey in Sauce
« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2012, 09:37:47 AM »
DM;
Just be very careful when adding honey, or any kind of sugar to your sauce as you will increase the potential for it to scorch around the edge of the pizza during baking, thus ruining the flavor of the pizza. One way we have found to address the acidity issue is to add powdered Parmesan and Romano cheese to the sauce to mellow the flavor out.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline SinoChef

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Re: Honey in Sauce
« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2012, 04:22:40 PM »
DM;
Just be very careful when adding honey, or any kind of sugar to your sauce as you will increase the potential for it to scorch around the edge of the pizza during baking, thus ruining the flavor of the pizza. One way we have found to address the acidity issue is to add powdered Parmesan and Romano cheese to the sauce to mellow the flavor out.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

That does not appeal to my cook logic. Powdered cheese = salinity  for me, which would intensify the acidity. Not hide it.  I will have to try it.

Usually when am trying to "bend" out the "tinny", or acidity of caned tomatoes. it is because I am using inferior product. And it is not going on pizza, but being eaten directly.

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,19392.msg189776.html#msg189776

Offline dmcavanagh

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Re: Honey in Sauce
« Reply #6 on: July 10, 2012, 05:04:01 PM »
I'm not a fan of adding powdered cheeses to my sauce either, the amount of honey I would add (and I seldom have to because I usually only buy good tomatoes) would surely not be enough to result in a "burning" sauce issue.

Offline SinoChef

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Re: Honey in Sauce
« Reply #7 on: July 30, 2012, 05:31:27 PM »
Quote
One way we have found to address the acidity issue is to add powdered Parmesan and Romano cheese to the sauce to mellow the flavor out.


Quote
That does not appeal to my cook logic. Powdered cheese = salinity  for me, which would intensify the acidity. Not hide it.  I will have to try it.

Mr. Lehmann,

I know you are not shocked, but I was. Great tip. If you are using less then great canned tomato product.

It absolutely flattened the "tinny" and acidic flavors out.  85 gram bottle of Kraft Parmesan to 1 # 10 can of tomato product.

I stand, corrected.

Thank you.


 

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