Author Topic: My dough is not strong enough to spin  (Read 1265 times)

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Offline Fio

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My dough is not strong enough to spin
« on: January 23, 2006, 11:50:11 AM »
This is my first post, so please be kind. 

This is the recipe I use, derived from Correll Concept's "Encyclopizza" website:

16 oz bread flour
10 oz. water
2-1/2 tsp active dry yeast
1-5/8 tsp salt
1 tsp. sugar.

2 oz water is set aside and I dissolve the salt in it.  I dissolve the yeast and sugar in the remaining water and when it foams, add it to the flour with the salt solution and mix in my kitchen aid until it balls up.   I let it rest for 5 minutes, then knead for 5 more minutes.

When it's done kneading, I work it on my pizza board and add just enough bench flour until it does not stick to my hands.  The objective is the wettest dough possible without sticking; otherwise, if it's too dry, it's impossible to stretch.

Form it into two balls, drizzle some olive oil into two round disposable plastic Ziploc containers, and swirl each ball in the oil until coated.  I then press the ball flat to fit into the round shape of the plastic tub, and let rise in the fridge for 18 hours. 

After 18 hours, (i.e. the next day), I bring them up to room temp and press them out, coating them with cornmeal as I go.

They stretch easily - TOO easily; if I'm not careful, the dough will collapse under it's own weight and will develop holes.  Theres's no way it is strong enough to be slapped, pounded, flung, and spun like they do in NY style joints.

What's my problem?  Dough too wet? Not kneaded enough?

Thanks in advance.

- Fio

Since joining this forum, I've begun using words like "autolyze" and have become anal about baker's percents.  My dough is forever changed.


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: My dough is not strong enough to spin
« Reply #1 on: January 23, 2006, 12:18:45 PM »
Fio,

You may want to lower the hydration (the ratio of the weight of water to the weight of flour), by using less water. The hydration of the formulation you posted is almost 63%, which is a little bit on the high side for most brands of bread flour. Using around 9.6 ounces of water would lower the hydration to 60% and hopefully produce a better handling dough. You might also reduce the amount of yeast (ADY) if you are cold fermenting the dough. Sometimes a dough will stretch and toss better and be more elastic when it is a bit on the cool side when you work with it. You may want to experiment with this.

I would also like to suggest that you try the following sequence for making the dough: 1) proof the ADY in a small amount of water, at around 105-115 degrees F, for about 10 minutes, without any sugar or only a small pinch; 2) in the  mixer bowl, dissolve the salt and sugar in the remaining water (cool); 3) add the proofed ADY to the water mixture in the mixer bowl; and 4) add the flour to the mixer bowl and mix/knead.

Peter


Offline Fio

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Re: My dough is not strong enough to spin
« Reply #2 on: January 23, 2006, 02:10:19 PM »
Fio,

You may want to lower the hydration (the ratio of the weight of water to the weight of flour), by using less water. The hydration of the formulation you posted is almost 63%, which is a little bit on the high side for most brands of bread flour. Using around 9.6 ounces of water would lower the hydration to 60% and hopefully produce a better handling dough. You might also reduce the amount of yeast (ADY) if you are cold fermenting the dough. Sometimes a dough will stretch and toss better and be more elastic when it is a bit on the cool side when you work with it. You may want to experiment with this.

I would also like to suggest that you try the following sequence for making the dough: 1) proof the ADY in a small amount of water, at around 105-115 degrees F, for about 10 minutes, without any sugar or only a small pinch; 2) in the  mixer bowl, dissolve the salt and sugar in the remaining water (cool); 3) add the proofed ADY to the water mixture in the mixer bowl; and 4) add the flour to the mixer bowl and mix/knead.

Peter



Thanks.  One of the things that amazes me is that the amounts of additional water/flour added to a dough are critical and miniscule.  Adding a little more of either yields dramatically differernt results.

 You are suggesting that I use 9.6 ounces of water as opposed to 10 ounces.  My measuring cups are not accurate enough to assure the accuracy of 9.6 ounces.

I do have a very accurate digital scale.  Can I measure the water by WEIGHT, instead of volume?
Since joining this forum, I've begun using words like "autolyze" and have become anal about baker's percents.  My dough is forever changed.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: My dough is not strong enough to spin
« Reply #3 on: January 23, 2006, 03:06:28 PM »
Fio,

Since you were using a Correll recipe I assumed that the water was stated by weight rather than volume. If you used 10 fluid ounces, the results might have been thrown off a bit but not by much. Since you have a digital scale, I would use it to weigh the water and flour.

Peter