Author Topic: Flour for standart home oven  (Read 851 times)

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Offline M4rtin

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Flour for standart home oven
« on: April 17, 2013, 05:53:06 PM »
I'm a newbie when it comes to making pizza and I always try to make one whenever I have spare time, always some recipe on youtube with All-Purpose flour http://www.fiveroses.ca/FiveRoses/ProductDetails/356
I thought I would shop around and try something different as far as flour, but reading a bit around here some flours are meant for high heat ovens.
My oven only reaches 500F, it's electric and has convection if that makes a difference.

I like thinner crust, more on a crunchy side, my favorites are hawaiian, margheritta, I do not pizzas heavy in meat.
If I'm posting in wrong section I appologize right away.


Offline mkevenson

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Re: Flour for standart home oven
« Reply #1 on: April 17, 2013, 06:11:30 PM »
M4rtin, I would say that any flour you can get in the grocery, ie AP or Bread Flour will work. I suggest you get a small bag of both and try them to see if there is any difference and which one you like best. You can also mix them together and try that. I suggest that you keep notes on what you do so later you can reference and see which you liked best. I have also used Italian flour (Caputo 00) mixed with bread flour with good results in my home oven.
To me it is fun to try new ways and ALWAYS good to eat your experiments. ;D
 
Mark
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Offline farmkid

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Re: Flour for standart home oven
« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2013, 08:50:56 PM »
Hmmm... diving in bravely on my first reply...

I think that mkevenson makes a good point: experiment! But I'll add that I, too, like a thin crisp crust and am currently working with an oven that only goes to 500 degrees.  After searching and experimenting a great deal  (as he says: experiment!), I found this:

http://anticopizza.net/

This is the best recipe I've found so far, and I now use all 00 flour and weigh everything in grams rather than estimate with ounces and various volumes. It's amazing how I no longer have to add a bit of water, stir, test, and try again: when measured by weight, the ingredients just work in together and end up perfect.

A comment about flour: as I understand it -- and I welcome correction -- thin crisp crusts should avoid high-gluten flours; breadier ones should embrace them.


 

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