Author Topic: Some Pizzas from my shop  (Read 1966 times)

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Offline jeepnrocks

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Some Pizzas from my shop
« on: April 21, 2013, 07:57:58 PM »
Hey guys, since Im new here Ill try to post as manhy pics as I can. Hopefully some better shots from different doughs/cook techniques ect. For now here are a few of the pies I make..


Offline jeepnrocks

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Re: Some Pizzas from my shop
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2013, 08:02:52 PM »
few more

Offline Tannerwooden

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Re: Some Pizzas from my shop
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2013, 10:01:40 PM »
Pretty impressive! How many different bakes is that?  What kind of times and temperatures?

Offline JConk007

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Re: Some Pizzas from my shop
« Reply #3 on: April 21, 2013, 10:28:18 PM »
Look great !Oven type ? Time ? and How long on the screen ? do you do that for longer bake or easier launch? asGene says I'd Hit that !
John
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Offline Ev

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Re: Some Pizzas from my shop
« Reply #4 on: April 21, 2013, 11:33:11 PM »
They all look good to me!

Offline pythonic

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Re: Some Pizzas from my shop
« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2013, 12:27:49 AM »
Looks good.  How long have you been open for?

Nate
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Offline jeepnrocks

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Re: Some Pizzas from my shop
« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2013, 12:35:38 AM »
thanks guys, the most interesting is the sausage stuffed banana pepper pizza. one of the guys that works for me made that. It was kinda like the b.p/ sausage combo on steroids, lol.

The oven is a blodgett 1000 and I'm baking at 600.

I was taught using a screen and it works well for my dough recipe which uses a good bit of sugar. It also makes heavily topped pizzas easier to deal with. Time on the screen depends on a ton of things. toppings, how busy you are, age of dough ect.

I prefer cooking straight on the stone but the consistency just isnt there for me at this point. Tomorrow I am going to make a batch of dough based on the Lehman recipe and see how it works for production.

For cook time I would guess 6 minutes for a stone cooked thin crust

Been open since the first of march Nate


Offline jeepnrocks

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Re: Some Pizzas from my shop
« Reply #7 on: April 22, 2013, 12:46:12 AM »
Here are a few more. These pictures came out a little better


Online waltertore

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Re: Some Pizzas from my shop
« Reply #8 on: April 22, 2013, 06:16:20 AM »
nice looking pies!  I use a stack of blodgett 1000's as well with the methods I learned growing up in the NJ/NYC pizza culture.  We cook them direct on the stone.   No sugar in our dough.  I find 600 to be pushing the edge on the ovens with uneven top and bottom browning results.  550 is the ideal temp for me.  Good luck on the new shop!  Walter

« Last Edit: April 22, 2013, 06:19:00 AM by waltertore »

Offline jeepnrocks

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Re: Some Pizzas from my shop
« Reply #9 on: April 23, 2013, 05:31:53 PM »
Hey Walter,
I think you may be right on the 550 sweet spot. I just cooked one at 600 and the bottom was done way before the top. I didnt get the browning that I like to see on my pies. She also felt a little soft. Have you tried a higher hydration to slow the bottom down a bit or do you think its the tall chamber of the 1000's that kind of skew the top/bottom heat.

p.s. do you normally smell burnt flour cornmeal from off the paddle or am i just a little sloppy being new to this style


Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Some Pizzas from my shop
« Reply #10 on: April 23, 2013, 05:44:03 PM »
All great looking pies. I really love that pepperoni and bell pepper. Beautiful crumb and beautiful pie all the way around.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Some Pizzas from my shop
« Reply #11 on: April 23, 2013, 06:25:06 PM »
That's real fine looking pizza you are serving Jeep. What type of pizza people/part of the country are you cooking for? Your toppings are quite generous and I think they match perfectly with your cornicione size.

Bob
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Re: Some Pizzas from my shop
« Reply #12 on: April 23, 2013, 06:43:56 PM »
Hey Walter,
I think you may be right on the 550 sweet spot. I just cooked one at 600 and the bottom was done way before the top. I didnt get the browning that I like to see on my pies. She also felt a little soft. Have you tried a higher hydration to slow the bottom down a bit or do you think its the tall chamber of the 1000's that kind of skew the top/bottom heat.

p.s. do you normally smell burnt flour cornmeal from off the paddle or am i just a little sloppy being new to this style

500-550 seems to work best with these ovens IMO for the NY style pies I grew up with.  I use a pretty wet dough.  I was born before all the fancy spinning and marveled at the old men who stretched and tossed only a bit. So many of todays pizzerias use a dry dough for its forgiveness.  I never smell burnt flour, what I dust the peel with.  Maybe you are using too much or are not scraping out the oven between pies?   I see 2 types of NY style.  The real hot coal oven and the 500-550 degree blodgett/bakers pride type oven styles.  Your crust looks on the puffy side for the NY style I know.  Most have a lower profile, less puffy edges.  I grew up in the 60's learning this stuff and todays NY style seem to have more and more the puffy edges.  This is all personal preference and to be honest I make my pies to my specs.  People connect them to NY style but I feel no pressure to emulate anybody.  I make them the way I like them and people can take or leave it.  I could never run a shop that catered to all the whims I see most shops leaning to.  If you make a solid cheese pie, you can rule the empire!  I will retire from my teaching gig in 9 years and am opening a very small pizzeria.  I will only serve cheese and pepperoni toppings, with fresh basil added before slicing.   It will be just me and my wife.  Old school, 30-40 pies a day.  For me all those toppings take away from the actual taste of what pizza started out being, crust, cheese, sauce.  Here is one of my crusts side view.   I use very little oil, and no sugar.  Walter

« Last Edit: April 23, 2013, 07:38:41 PM by waltertore »

Offline Chaze215

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Re: Some Pizzas from my shop
« Reply #13 on: April 23, 2013, 06:53:08 PM »
Walt,  what technique do you use to get a lower profile crust?
Chaz

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Re: Some Pizzas from my shop
« Reply #14 on: April 23, 2013, 06:56:31 PM »
Walt,  what technique do you use to get a lower profile crust?

When I remove the ball from the box I flour it in a bowl, put it on the bench and finger poke the entire dough to get any major air bubbles out.  Then I  stretch on the bench until its large enough to almost toss.  then I pick it up and do a hand stretch leading with my fist/knuckles and or index fingers and thumbs  run it around like the second hand on a clock moves(gravity stretches it with this technique) around the edge of the dough and finally toss.  The crust goes in the oven fairly even all the  way across.  It is  hard to explain it all via typing.  I prefer to show it in the flesh.   I see guys now really working on not deflating the edges.  Walter
« Last Edit: April 23, 2013, 07:44:34 PM by waltertore »

Offline Chaze215

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Re: Some Pizzas from my shop
« Reply #15 on: April 23, 2013, 08:01:47 PM »
So basically you work most of the air out of the dough prior to hand stretching. How about a you tube video?  ;D
Chaz

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Re: Some Pizzas from my shop
« Reply #16 on: April 23, 2013, 08:15:41 PM »
So basically you work most of the air out of the dough prior to hand stretching. How about a you tube video?  ;D

Yes - the big air bubbles.  Little ones abound and are good IMO.  I bet there are a ton of youtube videos out there showing this.  The main thing is I do not ignore the edges.   Many places now shape their doughs on the bench with extra care to not deflate them so as to add a puffy edge.  the goal often seems to be perfectly round and perfectly round puffy edges.  I prefer the imperfect pie.  In the end it is all about taste not really how it looks and do you feel your pie is the best.  Ignore the trends and turn yourself on and others will dig it.  Come on by my place sometime and we can shape together :chef:  Walter
« Last Edit: April 23, 2013, 09:01:50 PM by waltertore »

Offline CDNpielover

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Re: Some Pizzas from my shop
« Reply #17 on: April 23, 2013, 10:24:58 PM »
glad to see you serving broccoli as a topping - one of my favorite toppings!  :chef:

Offline jeepnrocks

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Re: Some Pizzas from my shop
« Reply #18 on: April 23, 2013, 10:43:14 PM »
Thanks for the replies guys.
Bob, I'm in southwest PA, about 30 miles south of Pittsburgh. A friend and I leased a kitchen in a local social club that is open to the public so we serve to the club members as well as the general public. I have always been a fan of the larger rim on the crusts, probably because of my first experience with a pizza shop in pittsburgh that did things this way. Personally I never really get anything besides a plain cheese or pepperoni pizza, however I have made reuben, pulled pork, breakfast pizzas and a ton more just goofing off in the kitchen. Cracking raw eggs on a pizza is interesting!

Walter,
Thanks for all the tips. I'm new at stone cooking so this is a learning process and all the help is appreciated. I learned on the knuckle stretch and still do it to this day. I usually slap the dough out or spin now. However my dough is usually soft enough that it only takes 2-3 slaps and finish with a small spin to have her stretched out.

Broccoli is awesome, that was blached in chicken stock, holds up great on a pie

Here's a small vid throwing one for a customers daughter ( a little sloppy, i ws nervous for the camera, lol)
« Last Edit: April 23, 2013, 10:44:55 PM by jeepnrocks »

Offline tinroofrusted

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Re: Some Pizzas from my shop
« Reply #19 on: April 23, 2013, 11:05:23 PM »
500-550 seems to work best with these ovens IMO for the NY style pies I grew up with.  I use a pretty wet dough.  I was born before all the fancy spinning and marveled at the old men who stretched and tossed only a bit. So many of todays pizzerias use a dry dough for its forgiveness.  I never smell burnt flour, what I dust the peel with.  Maybe you are using too much or are not scraping out the oven between pies?   I see 2 types of NY style.  The real hot coal oven and the 500-550 degree blodgett/bakers pride type oven styles.  Your crust looks on the puffy side for the NY style I know.  Most have a lower profile, less puffy edges.  I grew up in the 60's learning this stuff and todays NY style seem to have more and more the puffy edges.  This is all personal preference and to be honest I make my pies to my specs.  People connect them to NY style but I feel no pressure to emulate anybody.  I make them the way I like them and people can take or leave it.  I could never run a shop that catered to all the whims I see most shops leaning to.  If you make a solid cheese pie, you can rule the empire!  I will retire from my teaching gig in 9 years and am opening a very small pizzeria.  I will only serve cheese and pepperoni toppings, with fresh basil added before slicing.   It will be just me and my wife.  Old school, 30-40 pies a day.  For me all those toppings take away from the actual taste of what pizza started out being, crust, cheese, sauce.  Here is one of my crusts side view.   I use very little oil, and no sugar.  Walter

So well said, Walter.  This is almost a perfect pizza manifesto. I can hardly wait for those nine years to pass so you can open your pizzeria. I'll bet your pizzas will be fantastic. 

Regards,

TinRoof