Author Topic: LBE dough  (Read 1216 times)

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Offline moose13

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LBE dough
« on: April 28, 2013, 06:27:00 PM »
Can someone please recommend a dough for cooking in the little black egg.
My first batch was good but i really just made it up as i went.
I imagine no sugar or oil as it will cause burning? I am not a fan of real puffy doughs for some reason, i prefer a smaller rim and not so much oven spring. Thanks for any suggestions! 


Offline zaafreak

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Re: LBE dough
« Reply #1 on: April 29, 2013, 10:04:12 AM »
100 % KABF
61% water
2% salt
.3 % ADY

Mix until ingredients come together
Rest 20 minutes
Hand knead a few minutes
Rest 20 minutes
Hand knead a few minutes
Divide in balls and refridgerate for 2 to 7 days
Cook at 600-675

Offline moose13

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Re: LBE dough
« Reply #2 on: April 29, 2013, 06:22:41 PM »
Thanks for the recipe!
I am not sure how to convert this , but i will give it a try.
I will try it next and post my results.  :chef:
« Last Edit: April 29, 2013, 06:27:38 PM by moose13 »

Offline mkevenson

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Re: LBE dough
« Reply #3 on: April 29, 2013, 07:04:52 PM »
Thanks for the recipe!
I am not sure how to convert this , but i will give it a try.
I will try it next and post my results.  :chef:

converting is easy. take your flour weight as 100%, 2 % salt would be .02 x flour weight etc for all the other ingredients.

Mark
"Gettin' better all the time" Beatles

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: LBE dough
« Reply #4 on: April 29, 2013, 08:42:38 PM »
moose13 is right. What is missing in zaafreak's post is either 1) a dough batch weight (and the number of dough balls in the dough batch) or a single dough ball weight, or 2) a thickness factor and the size of the pizzas made with the dough ball(s).

Peter

Offline moose13

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Re: LBE dough
« Reply #5 on: April 29, 2013, 09:43:28 PM »
I generally made 3 balls to a batch if that helps.
Medium size, thinner pies.
Most recipes i use are about 3.5 - 4 cups flour to start.
So i guess i can figure it out from there.
Cheers!

Offline zaafreak

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Re: LBE dough
« Reply #6 on: April 30, 2013, 08:44:05 AM »
TF of about .07 for a 13 inch diameter pizza.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: LBE dough
« Reply #7 on: April 30, 2013, 09:00:57 AM »
TF of about .07 for a 13 inch diameter pizza.


Thank you.

Using the expanded dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html, we get the following for one dough ball. For more dough balls, simply enter the desired number of dough balls in the expanded dough calculating tool along with the baker's percents, thickness factor, and pizza size (and a bowl residue compensation value if desired).

King Arthur Bread Flour (100%):
Water (61%):
ADY (0.30%):
Salt (2%):
Total (163.3%):
161.3 g  |  5.69 oz | 0.36 lbs
98.39 g  |  3.47 oz | 0.22 lbs
0.48 g | 0.02 oz | 0 lbs | 0.13 tsp | 0.04 tbsp
3.23 g | 0.11 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.58 tsp | 0.19 tbsp
263.41 g | 9.29 oz | 0.58 lbs | TF = 0.07
Note: Nominal thickness factor = 0.07; dough is for a single 13" pizza; no bowl residue compensation

Peter

Offline zaafreak

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Re: LBE dough
« Reply #8 on: April 30, 2013, 12:03:29 PM »
Typical result...

Offline MightyPizzaOven

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Re: LBE dough
« Reply #9 on: April 30, 2013, 03:17:15 PM »
Peter, is there an ADY chart similar to the one Craig created for live yeast? To help figure out amount of ADY required depending on fermentation period.
« Last Edit: April 30, 2013, 03:27:26 PM by MightyPizzaOven »
Bert,


Offline moose13

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Re: LBE dough
« Reply #10 on: April 30, 2013, 07:12:20 PM »
Thanks guys!
The pizza looks great.
I will try this next.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: LBE dough
« Reply #11 on: May 01, 2013, 09:12:07 AM »
Peter, is there an ADY chart similar to the one Craig created for live yeast? To help figure out amount of ADY required depending on fermentation period.

Bert,

I am not aware of any such chart. I think the reason is that there so many different dough formulations that can use ADY (and in different ways) and they can have many different fermentation protocols that can include room temperature fermentations, cold (refrigerator/cooler) fermentations, controlled-temperature fermentations and even mixtures of fermentation protocols. Also, dough formulations that use ADY (or any other commercial yeast) can often include ingredients beyond the basic ingredients of flour, water, yeast and salt--for example, sugar and oil just to name just a couple.

The above said, I am aware of one method that can be used with a given dough formulation that allows one to adjust the amount of ADY (or any other commercial yeast) to adapt the dough formulation to a different fermentation protocol (based on temperatures and times). That method is described in Reply 6 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5028.msg42572.html#msg42572 and elsewhere in the same thread. However, to use that method, one has to create a Reference Rate (Rf). That Reference Rate is based on achieving a particular condition of the dough, such as a doubling in volume (although it can be more or less than a doubling). But to come up with the Reference Rate, you have to measure all of the applicable temperatures and times including, in the case of temperatures, the finished dough temperature and the fermentation temperature (or several fermentation temperatures if more than one is used such as in the example in Reply 6 referenced above). In a home setting, temperatures can be a problem sometimes because of variations in room temperatures and, in the case of cold fermentations, refrigerator temperatures. However, with some tweaking of the yeast quantity and/or finished dough temperature, I suspect that these variations can be smoothed out.

I think you can see why few people beyond a couple of crazies like Craig and me play around with these sorts of methods. But, in reality, if the changes for a particular dough formulation are simple, such as changing the fermentation temperature or the fermentation time, the math actually becomes quite simple and manageable. November's example in Reply 6 referenced above becomes much simpler and all you need is a simple online scientific calculator such as the one shown at http://www.eeweb.com/toolbox/calculator. If all you had was a single dough formulation whose ingredients and percents and the basic fermentation protocol are fixed, I suppose that one could come up with a spreadsheet or other tool to use to determine how much ADY (or other commercial yeast) to use with changes in the fermentation time or temperature.

Peter


Offline MightyPizzaOven

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Re: LBE dough
« Reply #12 on: May 01, 2013, 10:42:34 AM »
Bert,

I am not aware of any such chart. I think the reason is that there so many different dough formulations that can use ADY (and in different ways) and they can have many different fermentation protocols that can include room temperature fermentations, cold (refrigerator/cooler) fermentations, controlled-temperature fermentations and even mixtures of fermentation protocols. Also, dough formulations that use ADY (or any other commercial yeast) can often include ingredients beyond the basic ingredients of flour, water, yeast and salt--for example, sugar and oil just to name just a couple.

The above said, I am aware of one method that can be used with a given dough formulation that allows one to adjust the amount of ADY (or any other commercial yeast) to adapt the dough formulation to a different fermentation protocol (based on temperatures and times). That method is described in Reply 6 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5028.msg42572.html#msg42572 and elsewhere in the same thread. However, to use that method, one has to create a Reference Rate (Rf). That Reference Rate is based on achieving a particular condition of the dough, such as a doubling in volume (although it can be more or less than a doubling). But to come up with the Reference Rate, you have to measure all of the applicable temperatures and times including, in the case of temperatures, the finished dough temperature and the fermentation temperature (or several fermentation temperatures if more than one is used such as in the example in Reply 6 referenced above). In a home setting, temperatures can be a problem sometimes because of variations in room temperatures and, in the case of cold fermentations, refrigerator temperatures. However, with some tweaking of the yeast quantity and/or finished dough temperature, I suspect that these variations can be smoothed out.

I think you can see why few people beyond a couple of crazies like Craig and me play around with these sorts of methods. But, in reality, if the changes for a particular dough formulation are simple, such as changing the fermentation temperature or the fermentation time, the math actually becomes quite simple and manageable. November's example in Reply 6 referenced above becomes much simpler and all you need is a simple online scientific calculator such as the one shown at http://www.eeweb.com/toolbox/calculator. If all you had was a single dough formulation whose ingredients and percents and the basic fermentation protocol are fixed, I suppose that one could come up with a spreadsheet or other tool to use to determine how much ADY (or other commercial yeast) to use with changes in the fermentation time or temperature.

Peter




Thanks Peter, lots of information to absorb...
Bert,

Offline moose13

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Re: LBE dough
« Reply #13 on: May 05, 2013, 05:46:48 PM »
Made two pies today on the LBE. Using the suggested recipe.
First one i burnt the bottom. Stone temp of 600.
Second one that i gave to the neighbors, was just about perfect. I could have left it another few seconds but was paranoid about burning the bottom again.
As far as the dough, i like it! I took it out this morning to warm up, it was still a tad bit hard to stretch and sprung back, i made it work and made some good pies.
Thanks!