Author Topic: Brewer's yeast powder - any applications for pizza dough?  (Read 1771 times)

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Offline Johnny the Gent

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Brewer's yeast powder - any applications for pizza dough?
« on: April 26, 2013, 07:12:47 PM »
Anybody have any experience with this? I've used it in the past, but so sparingly that there was no real difference in taste/crust color. I'd really like to be able to use malt, but until I find some, can brewer's yeast be used similarly? If so, any recommend % for usage?

This may seem a bit off - but how about maple syrup as a substitute for malt?

Thanks in advance.

J

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Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Brewer's yeast powder - any applications for pizza dough?
« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2013, 07:18:09 PM »
Forgot to mention - I ran a search, and got only 2 hits.

While I'm in the mood - I think I'll make some NY style dough, supplemented with brewer's yeast powder - say 2%. I have a 3:30-4  minute pie in mind, so it'll be interesting to see what I come up with.
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Online Pete-zza

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Re: Brewer's yeast powder - any applications for pizza dough?
« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2013, 07:53:00 PM »
Anybody have any experience with this? I've used it in the past, but so sparingly that there was no real difference in taste/crust color. I'd really like to be able to use malt, but until I find some, can brewer's yeast be used similarly? If so, any recommend % for usage?

This may seem a bit off - but how about maple syrup as a substitute for malt?

Johnny,

I take it that you mean the nutritional form of brewer's yeast which is yeast obtained as a by-product of brewing, and dried and killed. It has no leavening power, so it can't be used to raise a dough. Although I have never heard of anyone doing it, it might be used in small amounts as a flavoring agent (it has a nutty flavor) in a dough. Some vegans use it instead of Parmesan cheese on a pizza.

With respect to the use of maple syrup in lieu of malt, yes, it can be done. However, the issue you have to contend with is how much maple syrup to use to achieve the same results as using the malt. This is a topic that I touched upon at Reply 366 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,18407.msg195965/topicseen.html#msg195965. But, in general, maple syrup is a good sweetener to use. As you can see from Reply 5 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4159.msg34719/topicseen.html#msg34719, maple syrup has the same sweetness as ordinary table sugar (sucrose) and 99.7% of the fermentation rate of sucrose. Since the maltose in malt has a considerably less sweetness value as compared with sucrose, as noted in the relative sweetness chart at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Relativesweetness.png, you may need to use less maple syrup than malt. This usually means doing some experimentation to find the proper replacement quantity.

Peter

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Brewer's yeast powder - any applications for pizza dough?
« Reply #3 on: April 26, 2013, 08:15:46 PM »
Yeast can pretty much metabolize malt as-is. They do well with both glucose and maltose. Conversely, they must break down the sucrose in table sugar or maple syrup into glucose and fructose before they can metabolize it. It is a much more time and energy intensive process for them.
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Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Brewer's yeast powder - any applications for pizza dough?
« Reply #4 on: April 26, 2013, 08:21:01 PM »
Johnny,

I take it that you mean the nutritional form of brewer's yeast which is yeast obtained as a by-product of brewing, and dried and killed. It has no leavening power, so it can't be used to raise a dough. Although I have never heard of anyone doing it, it might be used in small amounts as a flavoring agent (it has a nutty flavor) in a dough. Some vegans use it instead of Parmesan cheese on a pizza.

Peter,

Yes, that's exactly it. My intended use would be primarily to aid crust coloration, with flavor enhancement as a bonus. 
I just took a look a the nutritional label- for a 3gm serving: 1.1g carbohydrates, 1.4g protein, fiber .9g and 5.4 mg sodium. Hmmm... I sometimes mix in a teaspoonful with yogurt- it does add a uniquely toasty/nutty/yeasty flavor. Lately I've been adding a bit to savory reduced sauces and pan juices - it adds a depth and complexity to the sauce which my guests who've sampled it enjoy but can't pinpoint what it is ;D.

Looks like maple syrup is a go - I'll have to try that soon as well. Thanks for the info!

J
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Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Brewer's yeast powder - any applications for pizza dough?
« Reply #5 on: April 26, 2013, 08:24:48 PM »
Yeast can pretty much metabolize malt as-is. They do well with both glucose and maltose. Conversely, they must break down the sucrose in table sugar or maple syrup into glucose and fructose before they can metabolize it. It is a much more time and energy intensive process for them.

Interesting - on a sidenote, I've wondered what benefits (if any) are there to using fructose rather than sugar/honey/malt in a NY dough?
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Online Pete-zza

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Re: Brewer's yeast powder - any applications for pizza dough?
« Reply #6 on: April 26, 2013, 08:30:35 PM »
Johnny,

One of the negatives of using ordinary maple syrup is that it doesn't have as intense a flavor as other sweeteners, such as molasses or malt. To get around this, commercial producers of maple syrup use concentrated versions.

On the positive side, you might be interested in knowing that researchers have identified 54 antioxidants in maple syrup, with perceived health benefits, as reported at http://www.bakingbusiness.com/Features/Formulations/2011/5/Maple%20Flavor.aspx .

Peter


Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Brewer's yeast powder - any applications for pizza dough?
« Reply #7 on: April 26, 2013, 08:40:05 PM »
Peter,

Very good point. I'll have to pay more attention to the label because I don't recall if the maple syrup was concentrated or not.

Interesting fact on the maple syrup health benefits. I take it cooking the syrup (pizza baking) would "kill off" the antioxidants?

J
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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Brewer's yeast powder - any applications for pizza dough?
« Reply #8 on: April 26, 2013, 09:04:13 PM »
Interesting - on a sidenote, I've wondered what benefits (if any) are there to using fructose rather than sugar/honey/malt in a NY dough?

Yeast LOVE fructose.
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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Brewer's yeast powder - any applications for pizza dough?
« Reply #9 on: April 26, 2013, 09:06:44 PM »
Peter,

Very good point. I'll have to pay more attention to the label because I don't recall if the maple syrup was concentrated or not.

Interesting fact on the maple syrup health benefits. I take it cooking the syrup (pizza baking) would "kill off" the antioxidants?

J

There are lots of antioxidants that aren't denatured by low heat (as opposed to heat that would turn sugar to carbon).
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Online Pete-zza

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Re: Brewer's yeast powder - any applications for pizza dough?
« Reply #10 on: April 26, 2013, 09:15:40 PM »
I take it cooking the syrup (pizza baking) would "kill off" the antioxidants?
Johnny,

Since the article I referenced was a BakingBusiness article, I took that to mean that in a baking context maple syrup would retain its antioxidant benefits even after baking. As I understand it, and as noted by Craig, heat does not destroy all antioxidants. For example, green tea, which is touted as being high in antioxidants, apparently retains that benefit even when made into a drink. Also, I understand that some antioxidants, such as lycopene, increase when subjected to heat. Given a choice, I try to use all foods that are high in antioxidants in their most basic and natural form. This includes just about all berries, wine, coffee, tea, high percentage cacao chocolate, beans, prunes, dates, nuts, olive oils, etc.

Peter

Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Brewer's yeast powder - any applications for pizza dough?
« Reply #11 on: April 27, 2013, 01:05:36 PM »
Thanks guys, the green tea example was perfect.
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