Author Topic: Instructional "Sticky" for % weight measuring?  (Read 925 times)

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Offline Chicago Bob

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Instructional "Sticky" for % weight measuring?
« on: April 27, 2013, 12:23:29 PM »
Isn't it about time?
Anyone interested in posting "search" results here; I know there are a number of instructional attempts out there. Heck, I've even got a feeble attempt or 2 floating around.

Post them up here and then maybe one of the Pro's could shake it all out into a nice little concise Sticky?
Be nice to have a quick link to give to the ever increasing valued newb.  :)

Bob
« Last Edit: April 27, 2013, 04:45:47 PM by Chicago Bob »
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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Instructional "Sticky" for weight measuring?
« Reply #1 on: April 27, 2013, 01:42:29 PM »
I don't understand what you are looking for. I'm guessing it more than simply how to use a scale?
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Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Instructional "Sticky" for weight measuring?
« Reply #2 on: April 27, 2013, 02:27:58 PM »
I don't understand what you are looking for. I'm guessing it more than simply how to use a scale?
Sorry, talking about converting formula %'s into weight measurement actually. You know, 60% hydration = .60 of the total flour weight, etc.
Teach how to use weights instead of only being able to go by recipes where the volumes are given.
Thanks.
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Offline mkevenson

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Re: Instructional "Sticky" for % weight measuring?
« Reply #3 on: April 27, 2013, 07:53:19 PM »
Bob, I think I understand. There is a handy apple app that converts weights to volumes of specific baking/ food products. I am assuming that the baker who uses volume measurements would need to know how much it weighs. Ie. a cup of flour, a cup of Water, a tsp of salt, a tbs of sugar etc.
I have referenced that app before but will do so again
The app is called KITCHEN PRO
Fine idea, you have.


Mark
« Last Edit: April 27, 2013, 07:59:16 PM by mkevenson »
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Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Instructional "Sticky" for % weight measuring?
« Reply #4 on: April 27, 2013, 10:13:40 PM »
I'm just talking about having a sticky that one can easily give it's link(the sticky) to a newb when they say..."I haven't figured out the bakers % thing yet".   And in that sticky is a clear, concise explanation of how Baker's percent math works.
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Offline CDNpielover

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Re: Instructional "Sticky" for % weight measuring?
« Reply #5 on: April 27, 2013, 11:32:50 PM »

Offline Jet_deck

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Re: Instructional "Sticky" for % weight measuring?
« Reply #6 on: April 27, 2013, 11:40:56 PM »
Isn't it about time?
Anyone interested in posting "search" results here; I know there are a number of instructional attempts out there. Heck, I've even got a feeble attempt or 2 floating around.

Post them up here and then maybe one of the Pro's could shake it all out into a nice little concise Sticky?
Be nice to have a quick link to give to the ever increasing valued newb.  :)

Bob

Sorry if I am late to the party.  Wth are you talking about Bob? ???
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Offline c0mpl3x

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Re: Instructional "Sticky" for % weight measuring?
« Reply #7 on: April 28, 2013, 12:30:44 AM »
here's why volume to weight never works.

the scoop, shake, scrape level, in BCHG flour is 160-165g per cup, every time i notice myself weighing it.

i've done the same with el-cheapo AP and gotten 130-150

i imagine some full body flours can weigh upwards of 170g

how can you nail a 'specific conversion' of volume when your constant, is constantly a variable?
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Offline chaspie

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Re: Instructional "Sticky" for % weight measuring?
« Reply #8 on: April 28, 2013, 01:14:28 AM »
I like the explanation on the King Arthur Flour web site.  Of all the expositions of baker's percentages that I found when I was trying to figure it out, I thought the King Arthur site was the most clear.

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/professional/bakers-percentage.html


Offline chaspie

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Re: Instructional "Sticky" for % weight measuring?
« Reply #9 on: April 28, 2013, 01:31:28 AM »
here's why volume to weight never works.

the scoop, shake, scrape level, in BCHG flour is 160-165g per cup, every time i notice myself weighing it.

i've done the same with el-cheapo AP and gotten 130-150

i imagine some full body flours can weigh upwards of 170g

how can you nail a 'specific conversion' of volume when your constant, is constantly a variable?

Volume to weight conversions always work for me.  I now do it routinely when I find a volumetric recipe that I like. 

It's fairly straightforward to convert from a volumetric recipe to a baker's percentage version.  When you have a volumetric recipe that works repeatedly well and consistently for you using your customary measuring cups and spoons, then you are ready to convert it to weight measures.  Simply measure each ingredient by volume as you normally do, three times, and weigh it each time.  Take the average of the three weighings and use that as your new weight measure. 

For example if your recipe says to use six cups of flour, measure out six cups using your normal process, flour, and measuring cup.  Weight it.  Repeat two more times.  Take the average of the three weights and that is your flour amount by weight.  Do the same with each ingredient, then calculate the percentages and you're done.

Every flour is different, so if you change the type or the brand of flour for a particular recipe, you should expect that some adjustments to the recipe may be required. 


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Instructional "Sticky" for % weight measuring?
« Reply #10 on: April 28, 2013, 09:35:43 AM »
If the concern is about understanding baker's percents, then there are a ton of places on the Internet that cover that topic. On the forum, I usually cite the King Arthur article on the subject that Chuck cited but also the multi-part tutorial at http://www.wildyeastblog.com/2008/03/22/bakers-percentage-1/. If someone is interested in knowing the intricacies of using baker's percents and the like to create a dough formulation, several years ago I described such a process at Reply 29 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,576.msg5431/topicseen.html#msg5431.

There is also a tool that member November and I developed for the benefit of members who do not have scales or choose for some reason not to use them. To develop the tool, we took literally hundreds of weight measurements of different flours using different measurement methods and different measuring cup sizes. November then came up with an algorithm to finalize the tool. That tool, which is called the Mass-Volume Conversion Calculator, can be seen at http://foodsim.unclesalmon.com/. I use that tool from time to time to convert flour volumes to weights, but I sense that few others use the tool. It is also limited to the extent that not all brands of flours that our members might use are in the flour pull-down menu. Also, I suspect that people who use that tool for any reasonable period of time will find it preferable to just go out and buy a scale. In my experience, people who are not math oriented or who insist on using only volume measurements tend to give up too soon and, as a result, do not last long on the forum. Once in a while a member will try to help others who prefer to use volume measurements, such as Chau did at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,10789.msg96280.html#msg96280, but it is not something that is done very often.

Peter

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Instructional "Sticky" for % weight measuring?
« Reply #11 on: April 28, 2013, 12:54:05 PM »
Sorry if I am late to the party.  Wth are you talking about Bob? ???
Sorry guys if I sounded confusing.

Thank you chaspie...this is exactly what I was trying to say!!

I like the explanation on the King Arthur Flour web site.  Of all the expositions of baker's percentages that I found when I was trying to figure it out, I thought the King Arthur site was the most clear.

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/professional/bakers-percentage.html


I am going to file this link and give it to members when they say they don't understand Baker's percentages.
Maybe it could be put in the "New Forum Members" section right below" the Glossary of Terms"

Bob
« Last Edit: April 28, 2013, 12:58:52 PM by Chicago Bob »
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Offline tinroofrusted

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Re: Instructional "Sticky" for % weight measuring?
« Reply #12 on: April 28, 2013, 02:50:23 PM »
Isn't it about time?

Based on the discussion here, it appears that the answer to this question is "No".


Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Instructional "Sticky" for % weight measuring?
« Reply #13 on: April 28, 2013, 04:35:22 PM »
Based on the discussion here, it appears that the answer to this question is "No".
I hate that word... >:(
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