Author Topic: Pizza of the Month - Any feedback?  (Read 1596 times)

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Offline jamieg

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Re: Pizza of the Month - Any feedback?
« Reply #20 on: May 04, 2013, 03:07:50 PM »
To be honest, I'm not totally clear on how to separate the 2 styles.

On a good day - we can get leoparding / and a bit of a crunch. Though it is not easy to get the balance right.

I feel closer to Neapolitan for the following reasons (some of which are probably not relevant):

- the dough is only flour, water, yeast, salt (ok, a little sugar - I'm still not sure if we should be doing that)
- we ferment our dough for 50 hours
- we unpack the dough balls by hand - instead of rolling pin
- the oven floor is 370 c / 698 f
- the pizza cooks in 85 to 115 seconds
- we use fresh bufalo mozzarella
- we use the cheese sparingly
- it is never allowed to dry out
- generally we use very few ingredients
- we place the basil pre-bake


Online TXCraig1

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Re: Pizza of the Month - Any feedback?
« Reply #21 on: May 04, 2013, 04:51:40 PM »
My thoughts in red.

To be honest, I'm not totally clear on how to separate the 2 styles.

On a good day - we can get leoparding / and a bit of a crunch. Though it is not easy to get the balance right.

I feel closer to Neapolitan for the following reasons (some of which are probably not relevant):

- the dough is only flour, water, yeast, salt (ok, a little sugar - I'm still not sure if we should be doing that) You won't find sugar in many NP doughs, but I wouldn't blacklist you for it
- we ferment our dough for 50 hours could be either style
- we unpack the dough balls by hand - instead of rolling pin nor should you - ever! - for NY or NP anyway
- the oven floor is 370 c / 698 f somewhere in the grey area between the two styles but closer to NP than NY
- the pizza cooks in 85 to 115 seconds 90 or less is solidly in the NP range. >120 starts to get hard to consider NP. I'd say 150 is about the max for NP
- we use fresh bufalo mozzarella could be either style but not all that common on NY - my preference for NP but not NY
- we use the cheese sparingly could be either style
- it is never allowed to dry out probably more associated with NP
- generally we use very few ingredients could be either style
- we place the basil pre-bake probably more closely associated with NP
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Offline jamieg

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Re: Pizza of the Month - Any feedback?
« Reply #22 on: May 04, 2013, 06:19:29 PM »
I agree with all your points.

So, does anybody have any feedback - positive or negative - that I can give to the employees - and be able to say - look this isn't just my opinion - but this is information from a community of specialised pizza obsessives... ?


Offline jamieg

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Re: Pizza of the Month - Any feedback?
« Reply #23 on: May 11, 2013, 02:04:38 PM »
That's a slower, lower temp bake with no leoparding to speak of. Closer to NY than NP.

We've been experimenting with cooking the pizza in 2 phases to embrace both aspects of NY and NP. So, we cook the pizza at a high temp closer to the flame until we have some good rise and leoparding - and then move it to the point furthest from the flame to focus on getting crunch. In about 130 seconds we can get both leopard spots and some major crunch on the borders. Of course - the ingredients tend to dry out a little and the contrast between the leoparding and the rest of the dough is not so apparent. This is particularly annoying with a red pizza like a margarita - where I really don't want the sauce to dry out - and there are so few ingredients to protect the sauce from the heat of the oven.

It seems that the pursuit of crunch is the main reason (perhaps the only reason) that people who love NP - tend to deviate from the protcol. I definately prefer the look of a NP - but the eating experience (at least if eating by hand) seems to be enhanced with a little crunch.

Anyway, is not the NY and NP debate not riddled with confusion. Especially - as within each genre there seems to be quite significant - and presumably intentional variation. A pizza from Sorbillo in Napoli looks like quite a different product to Una Pizza Napolitana in SF.

Whatever the case, I'm more comfortable hanging out in the Neapolitan forum.

Offline thezaman

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Re: Pizza of the Month - Any feedback?
« Reply #24 on: May 12, 2013, 10:19:27 AM »
 this is just my opinion. i worry about my pies being doughy. i would have cooked that pie a little longer.i do not know if it was cooked thru by looking at it, but i worry when my pies are cooked too blond. the only other thing i noticed was oregano in the sauce. that is not a Neapolitan ingredient in the sauce prep. no big deal i think you are striving for a hybrid pie,but i think the oregano is too heavy in a few spots. oregano is great in small doses,too much and it is overpowering. overall that young lady did a great job with that high hydrated dough!!!
« Last Edit: May 12, 2013, 05:45:00 PM by thezaman »

Offline jamieg

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Re: Pizza of the Month - Any feedback?
« Reply #25 on: May 12, 2013, 03:14:11 PM »
Thanks zaman,

I definitely agree with the blond issue. About a third of the border was lacking in colour and probably would have been doughy and chewy without any crisp exterior shell.

Despite the 50 hour fermentation - I think our dough is still too young - I say this because we sometimes struggle to get colouring. Our old dough has superb colouring - but lacks strength for good spring in the oven. I need to get the dough somewhere between those 2 states.

Also agree on the oregano - the type used in the video was not particularly good quality either - basically we need to get a top oregano supplier and use it sparingly.

Thanks again