Author Topic: lard in dough  (Read 1991 times)

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Online norma427

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Re: lard in dough
« Reply #20 on: May 10, 2013, 08:28:06 AM »
Hi Norma,
I didn't get the manteca that I usually get, but the market that I went to today is just as good if not better, so I bought there manteca. I'm trying NY style for the first time in my WFO, making dough tonight for Saturday pizza.

Thanks,

Vince

Vince,

The manteca you purchased looked something like mine before I refrigerated it at Reply 49 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,13668.msg138158.html#msg138158  Are you going to just add the manteca without refrigerating?  I don't know which way would be better. 

What temperature are you baking your NY style pizzas in your WFO.  If it is at a higher temperature you might have to watch your bottom crust for too much browning and maybe slide something under the pizzas is the bottom browns too much.  I am not sure what would happen with manteca in a dough in a WFO.

Looking forward to hearing about your pies.  I sure would think the crust would have a better flavor from the manteca.  The small Mexican store where I purchased my manteca flooded from a bad rain storm and then closed down and I never found manteca again.

Norma
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Offline vincentoc13

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Re: lard in dough
« Reply #21 on: May 12, 2013, 10:36:45 PM »
Norma,

Here are the result of my first NY pie recipe in my WFO.  I used the same one you did with your UBM recipe and I followed Peter Reinharts work flow.  The manteca was in liquid form, so I just mixed it with a spoon to get everything looking consistant then mixed in with all the ingredients as Peters requires.

My oven temp was anywhere from 550 to 590, it seems as though the bottoms did not get done as much as I would have liked, but it was my first time, so I will forgive myself.  The dome was around 850, it just seems like the cheese was just bubbling too much and I had to remove the pizza or it would have burned, even though the bottoms weren't where I wanted them to be.

OK, so the picture of the crumb shot did not come out that great, but the flavor was good, it had subtle rich flavor going for it
with a very, very slight crunch.  I was looking for something with more of a crunch to it, but no too much, just a little more than what it had.

Everyone loved the pizza! they went on, and on about it, so I didn't want to tell them I have a long way to go to get it where I want cause they would have thought I'm crazy.  but believe me I know I will get there.

Vince.

having problems loading pictures, doing it on tablet maybe that's why?

« Last Edit: May 12, 2013, 10:40:36 PM by vincentoc13 »

Offline vincentoc13

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Re: lard in dough
« Reply #22 on: May 12, 2013, 10:42:02 PM »
more pics
« Last Edit: May 12, 2013, 10:43:58 PM by vincentoc13 »

Offline vincentoc13

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Re: lard in dough
« Reply #23 on: May 12, 2013, 10:59:10 PM »
sorry, here is crumb shot

Online norma427

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Re: lard in dough
« Reply #24 on: May 13, 2013, 07:52:59 AM »
Norma,

Here are the result of my first NY pie recipe in my WFO.  I used the same one you did with your UBM recipe and I followed Peter Reinharts work flow.  The manteca was in liquid form, so I just mixed it with a spoon to get everything looking consistant then mixed in with all the ingredients as Peters requires.

My oven temp was anywhere from 550 to 590, it seems as though the bottoms did not get done as much as I would have liked, but it was my first time, so I will forgive myself.  The dome was around 850, it just seems like the cheese was just bubbling too much and I had to remove the pizza or it would have burned, even though the bottoms weren't where I wanted them to be.

OK, so the picture of the crumb shot did not come out that great, but the flavor was good, it had subtle rich flavor going for it
with a very, very slight crunch.  I was looking for something with more of a crunch to it, but no too much, just a little more than what it had.

Everyone loved the pizza! they went on, and on about it, so I didn't want to tell them I have a long way to go to get it where I want cause they would have thought I'm crazy.  but believe me I know I will get there.

Vince.

having problems loading pictures, doing it on tablet maybe that's why?

Vince,

Your results using manteca and Peter's conversion formulation of Peter's Reinhart's recipe sure looks great to me!  ;D

I think your crumb shot looks good.  I am glad you and your friends loved the pizza with the manteca.  I think it is hard to get a definite crunch in a pizza crust in a WFO.  My friend Steve (Ev) also thinks it is hard to get a crunch on the bottom, or even rim crust of a pizza baked in a WFO.  Maybe you will find a way to get that crunch.  My taste testers and I also thought manteca gave a subtle rich flavor to the crust.

I know you will get to where you want if you keep experimenting.  It's all the fun in the journey that is interesting and of course you get to eat the results.  :-D

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline Condolini

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Re: lard in dough
« Reply #25 on: May 14, 2013, 09:17:11 AM »
What's happened to lard? I haven't bought any since they started hydrogenating it and have not seen manteca (isn't liquid lard an oxymoron?)

Guess I'm used to the stuff we used to make at home. When the hog carcass is broken down bring home the fresh fat, cut it into chunks, heat slowly until the cracklings float to the top. Cool slightly, strain, and store in washed milk cartons (the waxy ones, not plastic.) Chill until solid, overwrap containers with freezer wrap, store in the freezer, thaw in refrigerator. This lard is white to ivory in color, solid, and relatively tasteless. We didn't render the skin, maybe that's where the color difference comes in. We used to fry pork chops or doughnuts in lard, some folks would use lard on their pancakes instead of butter. Leftover pancakes would be sprinkled with brown sugar, rolled, and wrapped in waxed paper for school lunch. Makes the best pie crust.

OK, enough about the olden days.  :-D That manteca from carnitas would find lots of uses at my house. All of this experimentation with pizza may find me canning tomatoes this summer!

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: lard in dough
« Reply #26 on: May 14, 2013, 09:29:17 AM »
What's happened to lard? I haven't bought any since they started hydrogenating it and have not seen manteca (isn't liquid lard an oxymoron?)
Condolini,

For my latest research, see Reply 18 earlier in this thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,25044.msg252936.html#msg252936.

Peter

Offline Petitroche

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Re: lard in dough
« Reply #27 on: May 16, 2013, 11:31:32 AM »
Has anyone tried using bacon grease?   :)
Pizza is to food what bacon is to meat.

Offline Canyon

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Re: lard in dough
« Reply #28 on: May 17, 2013, 01:10:34 AM »
Has anyone tried using bacon grease?   :)

Bacon grease could work, but would add undesirable flavors. Rendered leaf lard is a better choice, as it is snow white and virtually odorless.

For the record, when I worked at Sbarro back in '96 we used solid lard for the thin crust pizza dough. Unfortunately, today the lard has been replaced with olive oil and I'm sure improving the quality wasn't their goal for switching.


 

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