Author Topic: Blackstone Pizza Oven  (Read 289512 times)

nythincrust11 and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline scott123

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 6683
Re: Blackstone Pizza Oven
« Reply #440 on: June 26, 2013, 12:08:41 AM »
Demon oven!  :-D

Looks like it was droppped leading to a cracked stone and possible damage to the burner assembly.

Something's definitely wrong with the burner. Mark, I hope you contacted the company about that as well. With that much wrong with your oven, they might just send you another one.


Offline jsaras

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 477
  • Location: Northridge, CA
Re: Blackstone Pizza Oven
« Reply #441 on: June 26, 2013, 12:41:43 AM »
I got my oven today.  I didn't have any dough on hand so I got a crummy dough ball from TJ.  Since it stretched out to 16-inches and I'm not skilled enough to launch a 16-in pizza onto a moving 16.5-in stone, I had to use a screen. 

My IR gun isn't capable of measuring the temp I achieved in 10 minutes.  The pizza baked in just under 3 minutes and the oven spring exceeded anything I've experienced in my home oven with a steel plate.  I can't wait to get some real dough into this thing.

That said, what is the consensus on the recommended mods so far to ensure this oven lasts as long as possible?  I know I'm definitely going to keep an extinguisher handy!
« Last Edit: June 26, 2013, 12:43:23 AM by jsaras »
Things have never been more like today than they are right now.

Online jeffereynelson

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1238
  • Location: Los Angeles
Re: Blackstone Pizza Oven
« Reply #442 on: June 26, 2013, 01:08:01 AM »

That said, what is the consensus on the recommended mods so far to ensure this oven lasts as long as possible?  I know I'm definitely going to keep an extinguisher handy!

Hope you like the oven so far. As far as mods, there have been different suggestions such as adding a ball bearing or extra metal to where the flame hits. However I don't think there are any necessary mods at this point, since no ovens have actually had any problems. Any of the suggestions are just possible precautionary ideas. The oven works great as is.

Online tinroofrusted

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1128
  • Location: OC, CA
  • Experimenting....
Re: Blackstone Pizza Oven
« Reply #443 on: June 26, 2013, 01:17:10 AM »
Also, I am currently keeping my grill outside. I don't want to have to wheel it into the garage all the time. I will probably move it there if I stop using it 4 times a week. Is anyone else letting the patio oven brave the patio?

Probably pretty safe to leave it outside since the chance of rain between now and November is just about zero. 

Offline scott123

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 6683
Re: Blackstone Pizza Oven
« Reply #444 on: June 26, 2013, 01:48:52 AM »
I was thinking of just making a cube to slide over the outside of the whole thing like a jacket, will try a blanket first, as you say, cheaper??

A blanket is definitely preferable, as it will require no fabrication to create a cover for the entire heat shield.

Some things to keep in mind re; insulation, though.

Insulation will keep more heat in the cooking chamber and drive up the overall temp of the heat shield.  If the heat shield ends up burning through, this may, to a small extent, hasten that.

Because the heat won't be rising up and off the aluminum cover, the cover is going to get a LOT hotter.  I've talked about my concerns re; the aluminum melting before.  If you're going to add insulation, without a doubt, get rid of the cover.  Now... one very important thing, though. When you remove the cover, make sure the top stone sits flush on the top of the heat shield.  If there are gaps, you could have fibers coming through and getting on the pizza (bad).

I definitely think blanket insulation will go a long way in increasing fuel efficiency, will likely shorten bake times even a bit further and further resolve heat balance issues.  In addition, the insulation could end up prolonging the life of the powder coating on the top lid. Overall, there's a lot of potential pluses. Just get rid of the aluminum and be aware of the potential for fibers to get into the baking chamber.
« Last Edit: June 26, 2013, 05:46:25 AM by scott123 »

Offline scott123

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 6683
Re: Blackstone Pizza Oven
« Reply #445 on: June 26, 2013, 02:07:56 AM »
Btw, if anyone gets a chance, could they measure the the thickness of the stone and weigh it?

Ascertaining the density will go one step further in confirming whether or not this is a fibrament analog.

Also, Mark (or PT, or anyone else who has a cracked stone), it's up to you if you want to use it cracked (I probably wouldn't), but, if you decide not to keep it, could you perform a little experiment on it?  Take the longest piece and, with leather gloves to protect your hands, try snapping the piece in half.  If you can't do it with just you're hands, try hanging half the piece off a workbench (or some other sturdy flat surface) and carefully using your body weight to break it. I have a theory that this can be broken with very little flexural force, and I'd like to confirm it.

Online jeffereynelson

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1238
  • Location: Los Angeles
Re: Blackstone Pizza Oven
« Reply #446 on: June 26, 2013, 02:14:29 AM »
Scott I'll do it in the next few minutes. I just used it a bit ago so it needs just a minute to cool down a bit more. Just wanted to give you a heads up post in case you were wanting this information sooner than later so you can wait for it.

EDIT: Just kidding Scott. I just gunned it and it's still at 300. It has been cooling outside for over an hour... thought I'd be in the 100's. I'll do it tomorrow if no one beats me to it.
« Last Edit: June 26, 2013, 02:22:36 AM by jeffereynelson »

Offline scott123

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 6683
Re: Blackstone Pizza Oven
« Reply #447 on: June 26, 2013, 02:49:58 AM »
Thanks, Jeff. No rush.  It's just one of those pieces of information I'd like to have.

Physical fragility, can, to a point, also be connected to thermal fragility/lack of resistance to thermal shock, so, if the stone ends up having durability issues, the more specs we have, the easier it will be to replace.

Offline pt

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 103
Re: Blackstone Pizza Oven
« Reply #448 on: June 26, 2013, 10:25:10 AM »
Scott, the bottom stone weighs 6.61 lbs and is 14mm thick. I am almost certain you can break the stone by hand pretty easy using the edge of a workbench.

The stone could be this one from china.
http://www.amazon.com/kitchen-dining/dp/B005FYCBSU
« Last Edit: June 26, 2013, 10:49:42 AM by pt »

Offline scott123

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 6683
Re: Blackstone Pizza Oven
« Reply #449 on: June 26, 2013, 12:00:13 PM »
PT, thanks, I appreciate you taking the time to do that.

According to my calculations, the density is .056 lb/inch^3. I don't have the specs for fibrament, but cordierite runs in the .09 range, so I think it's safe to assume that this isn't cordierite.

Strictly speaking, it can't be a pure Fibrament analog without the reinforcing fibers, but it's definitely cast cement rather than kiln fired cordierite. This is basically the same material as the cheap walmart stones, just thicker.  I might recommend eventually replacing it with cordierite, if it weren't for the fact that the low density/low conductivity is an important part of maintaining the proper heat balance, so, when the stone goes, it will need to be replaced with either same stone or something equally as light/fragile.

I'm curious, are there any instructions for curing?  Even if there aren't, just to be safe, I'd probably cure this stone (start on lowest oven temp and then increase by 100 every hour).


Offline Jackie Tran

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 6968
  • Location: Albuquerque NM
Re: Blackstone Pizza Oven
« Reply #450 on: June 26, 2013, 12:09:03 PM »

I'm curious, are there any instructions for curing?  Even if there aren't, just to be safe, I'd probably cure this stone (start on lowest oven temp and then increase by 100 every hour).

I don't know Scott, but this sounds like a waste of fuel.  I didn't cure my stone and didn't have any issues.  I don't think any of the other members have cured either.  If it cracks upon initial use, you can always contact the company for a replacement.  I took mine to 800F+ on the first bake witout any issues.
« Last Edit: June 26, 2013, 01:19:15 PM by Jackie Tran »

Offline scott123

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 6683
Re: Blackstone Pizza Oven
« Reply #451 on: June 26, 2013, 12:27:22 PM »
Chau, cast cement stones (such as fibrament) tend to have moisture in them from the casting process.  If the stones have water in them or are stored/shipped in an environment where they get wet or are exposed to humidity, they'll crack if you crank up the heat. Sure, the company will replace them, but if it's between a couple of hours in a home oven vs. the potential of having to wait for the company to send me new stones, I might toss it in the oven. Am I being overly cautious? Probably- but porous stones are notorious for failing due to moisture expansion- and these, by their density, are incredibly porous stones.

Btw, when I talk about an oven, I'm talking about an indoor oven.  I believe 3/4" fibrament is a 5 hour process, but, at 1/2" I think 2 would suffice- one hour at 150 and then another hour at 300.  Turning the oven on right now, with the temps we're seeing, is probably something most people would want to avoid, but I'm just telling you what I would do.

Offline redox

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1051
Re: Blackstone Pizza Oven
« Reply #452 on: June 26, 2013, 12:29:18 PM »
Scott, the bottom stone weighs 6.61 lbs and is 14mm thick. I am almost certain you can break the stone by hand pretty easy using the edge of a workbench.

The stone could be this one from china.
http://www.amazon.com/kitchen-dining/dp/B005FYCBSU

Some reviews of this stone on Amazon like this one: "The only thing I don't like too much is the maximum rated temperature is 450F. This normally isn't a problem, except that I tend to pre-heat the grill to 500F, and then cool it off from there."
That couldn't be used in the Blackstone oven.

Offline TXCraig1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 11790
  • Location: Houston, TX
Re: Blackstone Pizza Oven
« Reply #453 on: June 26, 2013, 02:27:15 PM »
According to my calculations, the density is .056 lb/inch^3. I don't have the specs for fibrament, but cordierite runs in the .09 range,

I just measured the one I have, an it's about 0.07
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.

Offline scott123

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 6683
Re: Blackstone Pizza Oven
« Reply #454 on: June 26, 2013, 02:40:50 PM »
I just measured the one I have, an it's about 0.07

Thanks, Craig!

So, there you have it. .056 for this, .07 for Fibrament and around .09 for cordierite. This stuff is light. No wonder why so many stones are breaking in transit.

Offline JRo

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 45
Re: Blackstone Pizza Oven
« Reply #455 on: June 26, 2013, 02:44:46 PM »
So, what do you think then, would it be an advantage or disadvantage to swap in a Fibrament stone?  I just happen to have had one arrive yesterday - which I ordered back when I first started messing around with this thing...

Offline Jackie Tran

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 6968
  • Location: Albuquerque NM
Re: Blackstone Pizza Oven
« Reply #456 on: June 26, 2013, 02:52:25 PM »
Thanks, Craig!

So, there you have it. .056 for this, .07 for Fibrament and around .09 for cordierite. This stuff is light. No wonder why so many stones are breaking in transit.

So many?  ???  It is light but it heats up quickly.  When I swap it with my primo stone, which is twice as thick, it takes longer to come up to temps.  I like this stone.  I like this stone it works.

Offline scott123

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 6683
Re: Blackstone Pizza Oven
« Reply #457 on: June 26, 2013, 03:21:27 PM »
So many?  ???

I don't have an exact count of the members who have purchased the blackstone, but it can't be much more than 10.  2 out of 10 broken stones is a LOT. If 20% of their customers get broken stones, that's huge, imo.

When members have spoken to Axner, customer service has said things like "stones are breaking during shipping all the time."  In reality, I have yet to come across anyone who's gotten a broken stone from Axner. 

I'm not saying this is a bad stone or that it should prevent anyone from buying this, I'm just saying that it's most likely the lightest stone you can possibly buy- and that lightness seems to strongly point towards fragility. Lack of density and lack of strength are almost always tied together in these types of materials.

So, what do you think then, would it be an advantage or disadvantage to swap in a Fibrament stone?

No, no advantage that I'm aware of.  But I would keep the Fibrament stone around, just in case.

Offline communist

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 482
Re: Blackstone Pizza Oven
« Reply #458 on: June 26, 2013, 03:33:25 PM »
Got good responses from Cabela's and Blackstone.  Cabela will send out a new unit.  They will have UPS pick up my old unit.  I will try to rebox it (yikes).  Blackstone called.  They said the valve was right behind the black plastic dial, and he suspected a leaky valve.  He offered to replace the valve and send me a new stone.  He suggested that I could test the new unit for valve function by turning valve on to low, removing black plastic dial, and lighting a cigarette lighter to see if I got any flame.  I hope these units hold up.  The hood support bar on my unit warped after just 15 minutes of flame.  I will post a pic.   Mark

Offline slybarman

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1009
  • Location: Maryland
Re: Blackstone Pizza Oven
« Reply #459 on: June 26, 2013, 03:35:08 PM »
I imagine a light weight stone helps them to keep shipping costs down if nothing else. Though they might give the savings back in breakage.
« Last Edit: June 26, 2013, 03:37:13 PM by slybarman »