Author Topic: What are the differences between reddi-sponge and pz44?  (Read 1426 times)

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Offline ajcerimele

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What are the differences between reddi-sponge and pz44?
« on: May 01, 2013, 06:58:51 AM »
Can someone explain the differences between reddi-sponge and pz-44?  Reddi is labeled as a dough developer and pz44 is labeled a conditioner.  The people at the company really did not give me a good understanding.  Both have very similar ingredients and instructions.  I have used both, really cannot tell a difference.  I was wondering if anyone else could help me out..

Thanks,
Tony


Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Re: What are the differences between reddi-sponge and pz44?
« Reply #1 on: May 01, 2013, 08:06:24 AM »
Tony;
For all practical purposes there is not difference. Reddi-Sponge is the oldest of the two products (it has been around forever) and it is marketed to the bread making industry to reduce dough mixing time and give a dough with softer, more relaxed machining properties, these properties are critical in high speed bread production. PZ-44, on the other hand, is marketed primarily to the pizza industry to achieve the very same effects, only in this case we say that it reduces dough memory characteristics (also known as "snap-back") and this is the main reason for using it. Yes, it does still reduce the dough mixing time but in pizza production the doughs are significantly undermixed so reduction of mixing time is not as important as it is in bread production.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline ajcerimele

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Re: What are the differences between reddi-sponge and pz44?
« Reply #2 on: May 04, 2013, 05:44:11 PM »
Tom,

Thank you for your response, I really appreciate it.  I also have another question if you do not mind.  My pizza is rectangle and made in a pan.  High Gluten flour, reddi-sponge at only 1%, mixing time, 8 min or so.  What am doing that can cause my dough to to be "chewy"  instead of "crunchy"?  I cannot figure this out and I hate to keep wasting product to find the right mix.  After mixing, we cut it up, go right to the sheeter into covered racks, wait until dough rises, then we stretch by hand to fit the pan, wait until dough rises to the height of the pan, 1", then we use.  your thoughts on any of this?

Tony

Online Pete-zza

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Re: What are the differences between reddi-sponge and pz44?
« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2013, 07:07:50 PM »
Tony,

It might help Tom if you tell him the dough recipe you are using, including the brand of flour.

Peter

Offline ajcerimele

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Re: What are the differences between reddi-sponge and pz44?
« Reply #4 on: May 06, 2013, 08:55:31 AM »
Thanks Peter.  Here it is.  I used to use 3% sugar,but was advised by someone to cut that back a little, so I did.  Let me know your thoughts, appreciated.

flour 100%
water56%
salt 2%
sugar2%
yeast (cake) 2%
reddi sponge 1%

tony

Offline ajcerimele

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Re: What are the differences between reddi-sponge and pz44?
« Reply #5 on: May 06, 2013, 09:05:47 AM »
sorry, forgot to tell the flour.  rose brand high gluten 13.6 protein
tony

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Re: What are the differences between reddi-sponge and pz44?
« Reply #6 on: May 09, 2013, 02:46:21 PM »
Tony;
Your dough formula doesn't show any fat, and since fat is a tenderizer in baked products it will contribute to a more tender, less chewy eating characteristic. You can graphically see this if you compare the eating characteristics of regular and fat free tortillas. The fat free tortillas eat like a piece of shoe leather. Also, you really are not giving your dough enough fermentation time to develop a tender eating characteristic. I think your crust would be a lot more tended eating if you allowed the dough to ferment in the fridge for 24 to 48-hours before using it. Lastly, I think your flour is WAAYY to strong for what you are doing with it. I suggest changing over to a flour with a lower protein content, something in the 11% range should work better than your present 13%+ protein content flour. Lastly, if you use a generous amount of oil in the pan rather than shortening you will achieve a fried bottom on your pizzas which significantly improves the crispiness, but does not address the excessively chewy issue. If you use oil as opposed to shortening/plastic fat in the pan you should open the dough up to a size slightly larger than your pan size on your bench top, then carefully transfer the formed pizza skin to the oiled pan for final proofing.
P.S. If you opt to go with an overnight or longer fermentation time in the fridge, you will need to delete the Reddi-Sponge from the dough formula.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor


 

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