Author Topic: inconsistant  (Read 664 times)

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Offline pmpmypie

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inconsistant
« on: May 17, 2013, 02:21:10 AM »
50 pounds of flour
4 cups of sugar 28oz
1 cup of salt 7 oz
2 cups of oil 16oz
4 oz of yeast
14 quarts of water

I dump flower in mixer, add sugar and salt in a bucket, add water to bucket, stir bucket while adding yeast. I pour bucket into the mixer while the mixer is on. I let mix for 20-25 minutes. I temp the dough and stop it when it gets 83-85 degrees, this usually takes from 20-25 minutes. i immediately weigh dough to 24oz, ball and put in totes. This is where the operation varries. A lot of times i immediately stomp the dough and put it in the walk in refridgerator. The dough starts to settle before i stomp because it takes awhile to ball and weigh that much dough. Other times i put the dough in the walk in after balling and wheighing without stomping. We use the dough the same day it is made. We sell from 50 to 100 pizzas a night andthere is not enough room to make a few days worth of dough.

The problem is some nights the dough will not rise and cooks like rubber. Other nights it blows up way to thick. Ney york style is the goal. Id say most nights it comes out great. Why would the dough not rise some nights? I can deal with dough that is blown up, dealing with dough that wont rise and feels ;like rubber is difficult. Multiple peopl make the dough so the operation might not always be exactly the same. It should be the same but you know how things get when multiple people start doing things. The water temp varries. mostly luke warm water though.


Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Re: inconsistant
« Reply #1 on: May 17, 2013, 08:34:19 AM »
Lets take a look at a couple of things, Why would the crust be tough and rubbery? Ans: Either too much protein in the flour you are using or insufficient fermentation for the type of flour that you're using. For your process I would say that a flour with not more than 12% protein content should be sufficient. You might even be able to drop down into the 11% protein range. Examples of this type of flour are;  12% protein: General Mills Washburn's, Full Strength or Superlative. 11% protein: H&R Bread & Pizza, King Wheat, Doughbuilder, and GM-44. By using one of these lower protein content flours your should be able to use your short fermentation time without creating a tough, chewy finished crust. As for the failure of the crust to rise during baking, this can be partially related to an overly strong dough that resists expansion/oven spring during baking, again, going to a lower protein flour should help. The fact that you are blending the salt and sugar together might also impair the yeasts ability to function in a normal manner, so I would suggest adding the yeast separately. If it is IDY or compressed yeast it does NOT need to be suspended in water before addition. For your operation I think a better dough management process would be to mix the dough to a fixed time (say 15-minutes in low speed) as it is not recommended that you mix a dough to temperature as you will never know what the level of dough development is. Adjust the water temperature to give you the finished dough temperature you are targeting (*I'm thinking 70F water should be about right), then after scaling and balling, allow the dough balls to set out at room temperature for 30-minutes before taking them to the cooler. For a dough of your size, it should not take more than about 15 to 20-minutes to completely scale and ball. For a one day dough such as you are using times and temperatures are more critical than they are with a dough that will reside in the cooler for 24-hours or more.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Online Pete-zza

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Re: inconsistant
« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2013, 09:17:04 AM »
pmpmypie,

Out of curiosity, are the oz measurements you recited volume measurements rather than weight? And what kind of yeast and what kind of oil are you using?

Peter

Offline pmpmypie

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Re: inconsistant
« Reply #3 on: May 18, 2013, 04:49:56 PM »
Peter, I gave volume measurements and weight measurements, the oz's are weight. I am using a canola/ olive oil blend. The yeast I use is a compressed yeast.
The dough doctor, changing the flour is not really an option. I am just the cook, the owner has been using the same ingredients forever and is rather attached to them. Should I add the yeast to the flour instead of the water/salt/sugar/oil? If not at what point should I add the yeast. Remember this recipe has been used in this restaurant for 30 years and is gold most of the time. only a small percentage of the time do we get bad dough.Thank you for your response. I found that adjusting water temp instead of mix time was very helpful. We have had many changes in the kitchen staff so a bit of knowledge was lost there. We only started adjusting mix times to combat our dough problem.
« Last Edit: May 19, 2013, 02:25:41 AM by pmpmypie »

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Re: inconsistant
« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2013, 02:04:32 PM »
PMP;
The yeast should never be allowed to come into direct contact with the salt, and when you have combined the salt and sugar, even in a slurry, you are leaving the door open to inconsistent yeast performance. Compressed yeast can be added directly to the flour without the need to suspend it first. I would still go to a fixed mixing time, if for no other reason, for consistency. Adjust the water temperature if necessary to achieve your targeted finished dough temperature. I would also suggest mixing the dough for about 2-minutes, or just until you don't see anymore dry flour in the bottom of the bowl and then add the oil and continue mixing as normal. This will give you a much more consistently hydrated dough. As for cutting, balling, and getting the dough into the cooler, you should strive to accomplish this within 20-minutes of completion of mixing. Consistency in times and temperatures will make your dough management much more effective. Remember that old adage regarding quality: GIGO, or in this case, inconsistency in, inconsistency out. I wrote an article in my In Lehmann's Terms column in PMQ Magazine on Effective Dough Management that addresses all the steps needed to be taken to develop an effective dough management program leading to consistent/predictable dough performance and improved consistency with regard to finished pizza quality attributes. If you would like some help on this, please feel free to give me a call at 800-633-5137 (ext. 165) and I'll be glad to discuss it whit you.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor


 

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