Author Topic: Why 00 flour?  (Read 967 times)

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Mal

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Why 00 flour?
« on: May 28, 2013, 03:41:32 PM »
Legal definitions aside, I'm curious to hear the reasons why 00 flour is so essential to making Neapolitan pizza. I've tried a number of different 00 flours including the ubiquitous Caputo Pizzeria. All were wildly different in flavor, protein levels + gluten and so on.

So I'm not sure I see anything specific about 00 that makes it the quintessential Neapolitan flour.

I know some folks have speculated that it's a combination of the high heat from a Neapolitan WFO and 00 flour that makes Neapolitan pizza special.If so, what characteristic of 00 flour is responsible for this? Is it the level of starch damage during milling? Is it the wheat variety...I'll say again I've observed a fair degree of variation in 00 flours I've come across.




Mal

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Re: Why 00 flour?
« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2013, 04:05:46 PM »
I realise that opening post sounded a bit negative. I'm genuinely interested to learn what aspects of 00 flour lend themselves to making the ideal or quintessential Neapolitan pizza. Is it in the fermentation, dough rheology, baking? etc.
I understand there's been at least one attempt to replicate 00 type flour for making Neapolitan pizza in the states. Was that successful, compared with other domestic flours? If so it would certainly add weight to the argument that something about the milling of 00 flour is a key component of Neapolitan pizza.

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Why 00 flour?
« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2013, 04:20:36 PM »
Some good stuff in this existing thread:


http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=12201.0




Mal

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Re: Why 00 flour?
« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2013, 04:29:18 PM »
Thanks Bill.
So if I follow that correctly, it's mainly the unmalted nature of 00 flour that makes it "special"? If so, would a regular unmalted non-00 flour be an acceptable substitute?

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Why 00 flour?
« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2013, 04:44:35 PM »
Thanks Bill.
So if I follow that correctly, it's mainly the unmalted nature of 00 flour that makes it "special"? If so, would a regular unmalted non-00 flour be an acceptable substitute?


As Pete-zza covers in that older thread, the amount of damaged starch also plays a role. Other factors such as water absorption and ash content come into play to give each flour its unique characteristics. If you can find a non-malted flour with lower damaged starch, I would guess you could finesse a reasonable crust out of your WFO, but you may need to tweak the entire process: mixing, fermenting, proofing, etc. Others here have done it, but for the past 10+ years I have been sticking to flours that have been specifically milled and blended for Neapolitan-style crusts.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Why 00 flour?
« Reply #5 on: May 28, 2013, 05:00:26 PM »
Mal,

This is also a good thread to read on the subject: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,17555.msg170290.html#msg170290.

Peter

Mal

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Re: Why 00 flour?
« Reply #6 on: May 28, 2013, 05:07:44 PM »
Awesome. Thanks Bill, Peter. Reading it now.

Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Why 00 flour?
« Reply #7 on: May 28, 2013, 08:19:25 PM »

I realise that opening post sounded a bit negative. I'm genuinely interested to learn what aspects of 00 flour lend themselves to making the ideal or quintessential Neapolitan pizza. Is it in the fermentation, dough rheology, baking? etc.
I understand there's been at least one attempt to replicate 00 type flour for making Neapolitan pizza in the states. Was that successful, compared with other domestic flours? If so it would certainly add weight to the argument that something about the milling of 00 flour is a key component of Neapolitan pizza.

The American 00 attempts, such as Central Milling and Bay State Milling are close to Caputo but do not get close on one key factor: extensibility. That spec is important because you need to up the hydration on the American flours to compensate, and that may not be what you want to do.

John

Mal

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Re: Why 00 flour?
« Reply #8 on: May 28, 2013, 08:22:57 PM »
The American 00 attempts, such as Central Milling and Bay State Milling are close to Caputo but do not get close on one key factor: extensibility. That spec is important because you need to up the hydration on the American flours to compensate, and that may not be what you want to do.

John

Ah thank you!  that's good to know. Caputo Pizzeria does makes for nice extensible dough, at least in my experience, without the need for excessive hydration.


 

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