Author Topic: Detroit Style Pizzas made with Divella Semola di Grano Duro flour and Occident f  (Read 1173 times)

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Offline norma427

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These are the photos of the Detroit style pizzas I made with these flours.  Johnny the Gent had posted about using Divella Semola di Grano Duro flour in this thread http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,24649.0.html  These doughs also had grapeseed oil added as the oil and the dough balls were oiled with the same oil.

Both of these pizzas turned out good in my opinion and Steve's opinion.  They were different than the regular Detroit style pizzas I usually make in that the crumb was different and the bottom crust had a different crunch.  The first dough was made without salt and the second dough had Celtic light gray sea salt added.

Norma
« Last Edit: May 15, 2013, 11:11:18 AM by norma427 »
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Offline norma427

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Norma
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Offline norma427

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Norma
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Offline Skee

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Those look good, Norma!  What's the hydration and the weight of the dough ball?

Offline norma427

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Those look good, Norma!  What's the hydration and the weight of the dough ball?

Britt,

Thanks!  The hydration was 80% and the weights of the dough balls were 9.5 ounces.

Norma
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Offline Skee

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Norma,

At 80% does the dough almost spread itself in the pan?  It looks almost like yogurt consistency.

Offline norma427

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Norma,

At 80% does the dough almost spread itself in the pan?  It looks almost like yogurt consistency.


Britt,

If you are interested in what the dough balls looked like, I posted at Reply 46 what the one dough ball looked like when it was balled. http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,24649.msg253488.html#msg253488  And later in the same thread a photo of the second dough ball.  In the same thread I posted that the dough balls were not that sticky.  I am not sure, but think the Divella Semola di Grano Duro does absorb more of the formula water than other flours do, or either since the flour was old, that might have also helped.  Earlier in Johnny's thread I have other photos and explanations if you didn't see them. 

When the dough balls were cold, there was no problems spreading them in the steel pans.  Those two dough balls acted normally when spreading.  Cold dough is much easier to work with at a high hydration than warm dough.  I think the dough balls did ferment more because of the higher hydration though.  That is even the one with the salt added.  The second skin in the pan fermented a lot when it was tempered for a longer period than the first one.  I wish I would have taken a photo of that went it came out of the little proofer I use, but I jiggled it and it looked like jelly when it was warm, but it quickly fell a fair amount.  I wish I would not have jiggled it. 

I want to try another experiment with using the Divella Semola di Grano Duro flour, but less of that flour and more Occident flour to see what might happen.  I really don't know, but don't think Occident flour alone can handle 80% hydration with my limited dough making skills in higher hydrations.  I tried 85% hydration one time with the Occident flour on the other DS thread and had a mess with that dough.  :-D

Norma
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Offline Skee

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When the dough balls were cold, there was no problems spreading them in the steel pans.  Those two dough balls acted normally when spreading.  Cold dough is much easier to work with at a high hydration than warm dough. 
Norma - spreading the higher-hydration doughs when cold makes sense, thanks for the tip!  I might try an 80% dough with KASL and see how it works if handled cold.


Offline norma427

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Norma - spreading the higher-hydration doughs when cold makes sense, thanks for the tip!  I might try an 80% dough with KASL and see how it works if handled cold.

Britt,

That is one nice thing about baking a pizza in a pan, in that you don't really have to worry about warming the dough ball up.  Let us know if you try a dough with KASL at 80% hydration what happens.  You might need to use a few stretch and folds to make the dough manageable and be able to form it into a dough ball.  Heck, you could even try a batter-like dough if enough gluten is formed.  ;D

Norma
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