Author Topic: Convoluted Mess  (Read 854 times)

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Offline FranInMesa

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  • Location: Mesa, AZ
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Convoluted Mess
« on: May 16, 2013, 04:55:45 PM »
I'm at a loss as to which way to go!  Our restaurant has been doing great for over two years now and we get a lot of positive feedback on our pizza. Lately, we haven't received positive or negative comments and I noticed the crust doesn't seem all that impressive. More specifically - it looks flat. I decided to clean up our recipe book and discovered that since our original kitchen manager and pizza guru retired, the short lived replacement threw away and deleted electronic copies of our dough recipe and re-wrote it to what he was used to without consulting me. After he left and everyone decided his recipe wasn't up to our standards, the cooks tried to recreate what they remembered and unfortunately, the process has suffered. :'(

Therefore, I'm hoping that if I list our "broken" process, I can get some feedback on what's going wrong and why. The taste is the same as it used to be, but the crust isn't acting like it should. Instead of it being a semi-thin crust with a puffed edge, it reminds me of a frozen pizza. Thanks in advance for any help you can offer.

  • Combine the salt, sugar and INSTANT Yeast in the Hobart mixer
  • Take a small portion of the 90 degree water and whisk it together with the salt, sugar and yeast
  • Pour the rest of the water into the mixer
  • Add the flour and oil and mix for 7 minutes
  • Remove dough and portion into balls immediately
  • Spread dough balls out on cookie sheet and lightly coat with cooking spray
  • Cover with plastic wrap and leave out 30 mins
  • Move to walk-in and typically use within a day or two
  • Pull from walk-in, run through sheeter, bake

« Last Edit: May 16, 2013, 05:05:00 PM by FranInMesa »


Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Re: Convoluted Mess
« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2013, 05:10:42 PM »
Fran;
Here is where I would begin: Add the water to the mixing bowl (70F) into that water add the salt and sugar (no need to mix together) then add the flour followed by the IDY (it does NOT need to be prehydrated), mix the dough for 2-minutes at low speed, add the oil, then mix for 1 more minute at low speed, followed by about 8-minutes at medium speed. If your mixer won't handle the dough at medium speed mix for 15-minutes at low speed, then manage your dough in your normal manner. I'd suggest leaving the dough warm at room temperature for about 90-minutes before you use it on the following day(s). Note: Dough that is formed totally with a sheeter will have all of the unique raised edge characteristics of a poker chip. To get a more pronounced edge, use the sheeter to only open the dough ball up to about 2/3 of the desired finished diameter, then finish opening the dough by hand to the full diameter. Let us know how this works for you.
P.S. Anything that you can share regarding your formula amounts will also help.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline FranInMesa

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Re: Convoluted Mess
« Reply #2 on: May 16, 2013, 05:48:41 PM »
Tom,

Thank you for your help!  Here are the portions:

4 qt Water
1 oz Salt
2 oz Sugar
8 oz Yeast
15 1/2 # Flour
1/2 c Oil


If I could please get some clarification on a part of your suggestion: You said to leave the dough out for 90 minutes prior to using it.  So are you saying to pull all the dough out for 90 minutes and then put it back in the walk in? Then if the dough that was pulled out don't all get used have it marked so it doesn't sit out for 90 minutes again? Sorry - I'm a little confused on this.

Thanks!

Fran

Offline kevinbrown22

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Re: Convoluted Mess
« Reply #3 on: May 16, 2013, 05:59:11 PM »
So I have no constructive input but would love to know the name of your restaurant so I could try it.

Kevin
Science, better than making stuff up since well forever.

Offline FranInMesa

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Re: Convoluted Mess
« Reply #4 on: May 17, 2013, 03:01:14 PM »
Hey Kevin!

I'd love for you to come down and give me your opinion and try some really awesome food! We make EVERYTHING from scratch. 

It's called Poppy's Place and we're located in Tempe on the Southeast corner of Baseline and Hardy.  Let me know when you're coming...  ;D

Fran

Offline kevinbrown22

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Re: Convoluted Mess
« Reply #5 on: May 17, 2013, 11:19:42 PM »
Fran,
I live in Tempe, sorry to say I've never noticed your place, but will remedy that soon.
Kevin
Science, better than making stuff up since well forever.

Offline FranInMesa

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Re: Convoluted Mess
« Reply #6 on: May 20, 2013, 02:51:06 PM »
Tom,

Is there any further information you needed on the recipe you asked for? I'm really looking forward to your help!  ???

Thanks!

Fran
« Last Edit: May 20, 2013, 02:52:58 PM by FranInMesa »

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Re: Convoluted Mess
« Reply #7 on: May 29, 2013, 09:15:38 AM »
Fran;
Please excuse me for not getting back to you sooner. I have no excuse except to say that your post fell off of my radar. In reviewing your dough formula, converting it into bakers percent it looks like this:
Flour 100% Water 51.6%
Salt 0.4%
Sugar 0.8%
Yeast 3.22%
Oil 1.41%
Comments: The salt level is much too low and that is severely impacting the flavor of the finished crust. I would suggest increasing it to a minimum of 1.75% (4.34-ounces/Call it 4.5-ounces and you'll be good)
The yeast level is quite high at 3.22% (hopefully this is compressed yeast). If my assumption is correct that you are using compressed yeast I would recommend reducing the yeast level to not more than 1.5% (3.72-ounces/Round it to 3.75-ounces). My personal preference is to have the yeast level at 1% compressed yeast (2.48-ounces/Call it 2.5-ounces). As for dough management, here is a very efficient dough management procedure for pizzerias:
1) Add water (75F) to the mixing bowl
2) Add salt and sugar to the water (no need to stir)
3) Add flour, and yeast (in that order)
4) Mix for about 2-minutes or until you don't see any dry flour in the bowl
5) Add the oil and mix 1-minute at low speed, then complete mixing the dough in your normal manner.
6) Finished dough temperature should be between 80 and 85F.
7) Take dough directly from the mixer to the bench for immediate scaling and balling.
8) Place the dough balls into plastic dough boxes, wipe the top of the dough balls with salad oil and immediately take to the cooler.
9) Cross stack the dough boxes in the cooler for 2.5-hours, then down stack and nest or cover the dough boxes to prevent the dough from drying.
10) The dough will be ready to use after about 18-hours and will remain good in the cooler for up to 72-hours.
11) To use the dough, remove about a 3-hour supply of dough balls from the cooler and allow to temper AT room temperature for 2-hours, then begin using the dough balls to make pizza skins as needed. The dough balls will be fine at room temperature for up to 3-hours AFTER you begin opening them into pizza skins.
12) Any unused dough balls can be opened into skins and placed onto screens and placed in a wire tree rack in the cooler for use later in the day. When placed in the cooler, allow the skins to cool uncovered for 30 to 45-minutes, then cover the rack with a plastic bag to prevent drying.
13) To use the preopened skins, remove from the cooler and allow to temper at room temperature for 30-minutes, then restretch to size, dress and bake in your normal manner. If you bake on a screen, NEVER EVER dress the preopoend skin without first removing it from the screen, failure to do this will result in the dough locking into the screen openings, making removal from the screen impossible.
You may need to experiment a little with your tempering times to find what works best in YOUR shop, but this should get you pretty close. Try this and let me know if it gives you an improvement, we can always make further adjustments to fine tune the formula and/or dough management procedure.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor


 

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