Author Topic: What happened in 1995  (Read 659 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline cofi

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 10
  • Location: co
  • I Love Pizza!
What happened in 1995
« on: May 21, 2013, 09:42:27 AM »
while lurking here i have noticed a lot of posts referring to pre '95 slices what happened in 95 that changed the face of the ny slice?


Offline slybarman

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1000
  • Location: Maryland
Re: What happened in 1995
« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2013, 10:46:56 AM »
I think Scott123 will tell you that pizzerias turned their oven temps lower to save money, but there may have been other changes.

Offline cofi

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 10
  • Location: co
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: What happened in 1995
« Reply #2 on: May 21, 2013, 09:59:43 PM »
I think Scott123 will tell you that pizzerias turned their oven temps lower to save money, but there may have been other changes.

all of em?

i thought it was like a mozzarella ban or something

Offline PetersPizza

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 82
  • Age: 38
  • Location: Oregon
Re: What happened in 1995
« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2013, 02:43:46 AM »

Offline cofi

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 10
  • Location: co
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: What happened in 1995
« Reply #4 on: May 22, 2013, 09:45:30 AM »
I suggest reading though this topic, http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,20460.msg202673.html#msg202673

-Peter


that thread is what made me post my thread it doesnt say what specifically tanked the slice in 95

i was raised and spent 90%of my adult life in north jersey i noticed the crappy pizza wave and the apathy i was just wondering what caused it all

btw something to make us pizza fans sad.....my buddy lives on flatbush in brooklyn and just orders papa johns and dominos  the good pizza ploaces 7 min away are "too far"

Offline slybarman

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1000
  • Location: Maryland
Re: What happened in 1995
« Reply #5 on: May 22, 2013, 10:27:24 AM »


None of this happened overnight.  The transition was just slow enough for the majority of people to be completely oblivious. Owner by owner would see the business that the chains were doing and say to themselves, "Hey, if people are paying good money for this garbage, why am I spending so much on the fuel it takes for hotter ovens/faster bakes? Why am I spending the extra cash to hire skilled stretchers?"  Slowly but surely, the ovens were turned down, the unskilled teenagers replaced the crusty old pizzaiolos, and the bake times were increased.  Goodbye, puffy rims. So long, oven spring.  See ya later, thin, hard to stretch crusts.  Great pizza, farewell.

I'd say this was the gist of it. (emphasis mine)