Author Topic: What causes Chewy crust?  (Read 471 times)

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Offline TAD88

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What causes Chewy crust?
« on: June 03, 2016, 07:10:20 PM »
Hi im a long time reader and just joined what causes a chewy Crust?

Online the1mu

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What causes Chewy crust?
« Reply #1 on: June 03, 2016, 09:08:04 PM »
Often, high gluten flour tends toward a chewy crust. Over mixing also can be a factor.

If you are having a problem with overly chewiness (some chewiness is desirable in many people's opinion), post some more details like what flour you are using, your formula and a very detailed description of your work flow and the members here can help you figure out why it may be chewy.
« Last Edit: June 03, 2016, 09:10:32 PM by the1mu »

Offline TAD88

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Re: What causes Chewy crust?
« Reply #2 on: June 03, 2016, 11:44:39 PM »
Sure sorry for the lack of info.
I'm have All Trumps flour and mixing for 15 min on setting 2 on my kitchen aid stand mixer.

Last minute dough that had a 4 hr rise normally I would do 3 days in the fridge.

Here is the Formula i am using.

Flour (100%):243.62 g  |  8.59 oz | 0.54 lbs
Water (62%): 151.04 g  |  5.33 oz | 0.33 lbs
IDY (.17%):0.41 g | 0.01 oz | 0 lbs | 0.14 tsp | 0.05 tbsp
Salt (2.5%):6.09 g | 0.21 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.09 tsp | 0.36 tbsp
Oil (2%):4.87 g | 0.17 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.08 tsp | 0.36 tbsp
Sugar (2%):4.87 g | 0.17 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.22 tsp | 0.41 tbsp
Total (168.67%):410.92 g | 14.49 oz | 0.91 lbs | TF = 0.1092

Baking on 1/4 inch baking steel on center rack at 500 for 8-10 min
pre heating for 90 min.

And family was wondering about why the crust is really chewy.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2016, 12:03:16 AM by TAD88 »

Online the1mu

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Re: What causes Chewy crust?
« Reply #3 on: June 03, 2016, 11:47:37 PM »
15 min on 2nd setting is a heck of a long time. That's where your chewiness is coming from!

Offline TAD88

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Re: What causes Chewy crust?
« Reply #4 on: June 04, 2016, 12:24:13 AM »
What setting should i use then and for how long?

Online the1mu

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What causes Chewy crust?
« Reply #5 on: June 04, 2016, 12:26:02 AM »
There is no correct answer. Your dough should tell you. There is a great thread about mixing times and method and the results that you should be looking for.

It's this thread by rparker: On Mixing
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=41539
« Last Edit: June 04, 2016, 12:28:09 AM by the1mu »

Offline TAD88

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Re: What causes Chewy crust?
« Reply #6 on: June 04, 2016, 12:29:47 AM »
i have read the forums my problem is my mixer does not like the low setting while mixing dough. Nothing like the sound of grinding parts. I will re visit that thread.
Thanks

Online the1mu

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Re: What causes Chewy crust?
« Reply #7 on: June 04, 2016, 01:06:08 AM »
i have read the forums my problem is my mixer does not like the low setting while mixing dough. Nothing like the sound of grinding parts. I will re visit that thread.
Thanks

You can use second speed no problem. But the time is very high. I'd incorporate like a 20 min rest/autolyse after forming a shaggy ball and then mix for another 2 minutes or so on 2nd. If you still need more strength built into the dough, stretch and folds may be the way to go.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: What causes Chewy crust?
« Reply #8 on: June 04, 2016, 10:23:51 AM »
TAD88,

There are many variables involved, including those mentioned by Aric (the1mu). But one thing you might try is raising the steel higher in the oven, which several of our members have found to work well when using a steel in a home oven. See, for example, Reply 1 at:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=40247.msg401401#msg401401

From the formulation standpoint, you could use a flour that is lower in protein than the All Trumps, for example, something in the range of 12.7-13.5%. Another possibility is to use a slightly greater hydration value (say, 63%--the rated absorption value of the All Trumps). You can also increase the amount of oil a bit (say, to 3%). You can soften the crust and crumb by using more oil but it sounds like you are after something like a NY style (with a thicker crust), not an American style pizza that tends to call for a fair amount of oil.

Most people find that they have to play around with many variables until they achieve what they are looking for. Often it is a matter of matching the formulation with the particular type and brand of oven used, including related factors such as oven temperature and bake time and whether using the broiler or convection feature helps. That match of formulation and oven is underappreciated by many, especially those who are fairly new to pizza making, and usually varies from one person to another. And, invariably, there are personal preferences involved, such as the degree of top and bottom crust coloration, degree of chewiness or crispiness, extent of melting or browning of the cheese, rim characteristics (such as size, bubbling, blistering, etc.) or maybe some combination of these outcomes. That can, and usually does, vary quite widely from one person to another.

Peter


Offline TAD88

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Re: What causes Chewy crust?
« Reply #9 on: June 04, 2016, 10:49:52 AM »
Thanks for the info in your opinion what type of oil is best suited for ny style i.e. brand and type if even possible i know it comes down to preference. Also I will take  some picks of the next pies.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: What causes Chewy crust?
« Reply #10 on: June 04, 2016, 11:12:27 AM »
Thanks for the info in your opinion what type of oil is best suited for ny style i.e. brand and type if even possible i know it comes down to preference. Also I will take  some picks of the next pies.
TAD88,

I would say that the best oil to use for the NY style, at least in my opinion, is olive oil. It doesn't have to be extra virgin olive oil but if that is what you prefer, then it is a very good choice. But a lesser olive oil, even pomace olive oil, is still a good choice. I once suggested to a forum member who was a pizza professional that he use pomace olive oil in lieu of the extra virgin olive oil he had been using. He later made the switch and reported back to me that neither he nor his customers could tell the difference.

Many professionals do not use exclusively olive oil because it is more expensive than other oils. So, they may use a blend of olive oil and another oil, such as canola or soybean oil. If a pizza operator is really looking to cut costs, they might use just soybean oil, and maybe not a lot of it. Most NY style doughs that use oil tend not to exceed about 3%. If you go too high on the oil, especially something like olive oil, you can get a flavor profile in the finished crust that you may not like.

Peter

Offline TAD88

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Re: What causes Chewy crust?
« Reply #11 on: June 04, 2016, 01:38:20 PM »
Today's fast pie with the tips I was given about mixing and Hydration. Top rack of oven baked on steel for 10 min at 500.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2016, 01:39:54 PM by TAD88 »


Online the1mu

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Re: What causes Chewy crust?
« Reply #12 on: June 04, 2016, 11:54:54 PM »
Looks great! How was the texture?

Offline TAD88

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Re: What causes Chewy crust?
« Reply #13 on: June 05, 2016, 12:13:01 AM »
Much better that's how it turned out after a 2 hr rise. I will be going back to my normal 24 -48 in the fridge unless I'm in a pinch.