Author Topic: sauce recipe  (Read 869 times)

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Offline drcoop

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sauce recipe
« on: May 12, 2014, 08:57:48 AM »
hello..i am in need of a simple but yummy sauce recipe.i have tried many but cant quite get it right...thanks


Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Re: sauce recipe
« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2014, 09:37:05 AM »
Oh boy, that is a very difficult question to answer.
I'm a firm believer that simple is best.
Fresh, vine ripened tomato slices (3/16-inch thick) patted dry with a paper towel, or a first class crushed tomato (canned).
Fresh, green leaf basil (not the dried stuff).
Fresh sliced/diced garlic
Directions:
Apply a light coating of olive oil to the surface of the pizza skin, add the basil (I like to tear the leaves into pieces and spread over the surface of the dough), apply the basil and garlic to taste then apply the tomato slices as desired (I don't go for 100% coverage, but instead look for about 75% coverage so there will be spaces between the tomato slices, just make sure a tomato slice covers each piece of basil.
If you opt to use crushed tomato start out the same way with the olive oil on the dough and then add the fresh garlic, roll and French cut the basil leaves and stir into the crushed tomato, apply the crushed tomato as desired.
Add the cheese and dress the pizza as desired. I like to garnish the pizza with an "Italian Wedding Bouquet" (the top four leaf cluster of leaves from a basil stem) placed in the center of the pizza, I then place the pizza back into the oven for just a few seconds to wilt the basil and "pop" the aroma.
I don't put any salt in the sauce since there is already plenty of salt coming from the cheese. For cheese I like fresh Mozzarella or shredded if you like, along with some shaved Parmesan and a kiss of Romano. This adds depth and complexity to the cheese flavor. No, it is not like Domino's or P.H., or P.J's, but I've yet to find anyone who didn't really like it. As an added benefit, the fresh basil doesn't contribute to heart burn as dried basil and oregano do.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline drcoop

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Re: sauce recipe
« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2014, 11:38:06 AM »
sounds good with the sliced tomato!always into trying new things and i just cant seem to get the sauce the way i want it...thanks

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Re: sauce recipe
« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2014, 02:20:25 PM »
One of the things that I've noticed over the years is that we are using more and more dried basil and oregano on our pizzas. The flavor imparted by these dried herbs is very pungent and it detracts or over powers the flavors from the cheese and tomato product. By using the fresh form of basil or oregano the aroma is more of a bouquet that does not detract, but rather compliments the other aspects of the pizza.
Another thing to experiment with is hand crushed whole plum tomatoes. The irregular pieces will provide texture, eye appeal and variations/interest in flavor to the pizza.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline TomN

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Re: sauce recipe
« Reply #4 on: May 12, 2014, 08:58:07 PM »
Oh boy, that is a very difficult question to answer.
I'm a firm believer that simple is best.
Fresh, vine ripened tomato slices (3/16-inch thick) patted dry with a paper towel, or a first class crushed tomato (canned).
Fresh, green leaf basil (not the dried stuff).
Fresh sliced/diced garlic
Directions:
Apply a light coating of olive oil to the surface of the pizza skin, add the basil (I like to tear the leaves into pieces and spread over the surface of the dough), apply the basil and garlic to taste then apply the tomato slices as desired (I don't go for 100% coverage, but instead look for about 75% coverage so there will be spaces between the tomato slices, just make sure a tomato slice covers each piece of basil.
If you opt to use crushed tomato start out the same way with the olive oil on the dough and then add the fresh garlic, roll and French cut the basil leaves and stir into the crushed tomato, apply the crushed tomato as desired.
Add the cheese and dress the pizza as desired. I like to garnish the pizza with an "Italian Wedding Bouquet" (the top four leaf cluster of leaves from a basil stem) placed in the center of the pizza, I then place the pizza back into the oven for just a few seconds to wilt the basil and "pop" the aroma.
I don't put any salt in the sauce since there is already plenty of salt coming from the cheese. For cheese I like fresh Mozzarella or shredded if you like, along with some shaved Parmesan and a kiss of Romano. This adds depth and complexity to the cheese flavor. No, it is not like Domino's or P.H., or P.J's, but I've yet to find anyone who didn't really like it. As an added benefit, the fresh basil doesn't contribute to heart burn as dried basil and oregano do.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Hi Tom,

Thank you for the great response. Just curious? Why do you apply the Olive Oil to the dough first instead of putting the pizza sauce directly onto the pizza? (I have seen it done both ways in pizzerias) Is this procedure done for flavor or for dough texture? Thanks again.

TomN

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: sauce recipe
« Reply #5 on: May 13, 2014, 08:31:30 AM »
Tom N;
The reason why I put a VERY LIGHT coating of olive oil on the pizza skin before adding the slices of tomato is that the fresh slices, even though patted dry will still tend to lose some moisture/weep which can result in soft or gummy spots in the finished pizza crust. The oil creates a waterproof barrier for our application. We have been doing this for a number of years now, especially at the shows which we used to attend giving baking demonstrations and so far we have never had any crust problems when using the oil even though at times we have allowed the dressed pizza skins to set for as much as 30-minutes before baking. I don't recommend this though as the character of the finished crust did change from those which were dressed and baked soon afterward. The crusts became thicker as a result of setting that long prior to baking, but they did not develop a gum line or any sogginess.
BTW: The oil application to the pizza skin prior to dressing also works well if you need to pre-prep or if you are making take and bake pizzas.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline bigMoose

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Re: sauce recipe
« Reply #6 on: May 13, 2014, 09:42:03 AM »
Tom any tips how to get a thin coat...spray it?

Online Pete-zza

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Re: sauce recipe
« Reply #7 on: May 13, 2014, 09:55:21 AM »
Dave,

Tom can correct me, but from some of Tom's videos I have seen, he uses a brush:



Peter

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: sauce recipe
« Reply #8 on: May 13, 2014, 11:31:57 AM »
I like to add the oil using a brush adding just enough oil so you can see a shine on the surface of the dough, anymore than that is not needed, and if you use too much oil you can create a situation where everything pulls off of the slice with the first bite. You can get a similar affect by using too much sauce too.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor