Author Topic: Brick ovens made in Italy  (Read 968 times)

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Offline lp

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Brick ovens made in Italy
« on: June 05, 2013, 08:18:34 AM »
Just getting started with making pizzas here in Taiwan.  I just returned from Italy and saw a few different pizza ovens now considering to buy.  The MAM and Ambrogi both have the Drango gas burner unit and the Ceky has its own proprietary gas unit.   They all look like great ovens but their prices vary dramatically.  One of them is made with bricks throughout the entire oven and the other two have cast domes.   Can anyone give me some advise about which one of these brands to buy?   Oh, and should I consider a rotating floor type?


Online scott123

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Re: Brick ovens made in Italy
« Reply #1 on: June 06, 2013, 01:37:44 AM »
I can't speak for any of these brands that you're looking at, and I'm still not 100% on board with the gas Neapolitan oven concept, but I would definitely discourage you from getting the rotating floor.  That's way too gimmicky and unproven, imo.

The other thing I would suggest is, as you look at these ovens, compare surface area to BTU output and see which one clocks in with more BTUs per square inch of hearth surface. Dome height is another important factor, but I think making sure the burner is more than powerful enough for the horizontal dimension of the oven is critical.

Do you know the dome heights of these ovens?

Offline synaesthesia

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Re: Brick ovens made in Italy
« Reply #2 on: June 09, 2013, 10:28:10 AM »
Ip

I assume you are after one for a commercial purpose. If you are in Taipei, have a look at Bella Vita Gourmet food hall, in the Xinyi District. There's a restaurant there with a gas fired hearth oven clearly on show even if pizza is not the only dish on their menu. It's tricky  with what you may want to offer in the end, as the Bella Vita visit may also give you an idea of the Taipei (and Taiwanese) demand for pizza, whatever way and style you wish to cook it. You might consider a gimmick oven for show and one that cooks the bulk of the  fare you serve as two different items. There are very few places in Taipei that serve authentic pasta that has not been altered toward the Taiwanese tongue, and the same goes for pizza. The food business is tough in Taiwan and I wish you the best of luck.


 

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