Author Topic: The dark horse that is gluten development  (Read 1687 times)

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Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: The dark horse that is gluten development
« Reply #20 on: June 08, 2013, 11:15:55 PM »
In my humble opinion... yes. It's made it much easier for us to get crunch on the borders - because the dough is lighter - the exterior shell gets crispy much faster.

I would love somebody to explain why you would be better off doing a short ferment with kneading as opposed to just long ferment - unless of course you just can't wait 2 days.
Thank you for responding to my question Jamie.

I too would be interested in hearing from one of the pros why a 24hr kneaded dough would be better than a 48hr non kneaded dough.
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"


Offline jamieg

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Re: The dark horse that is gluten development
« Reply #21 on: June 24, 2013, 11:52:32 PM »
Ah, yes. A very comprehensive tutorial.

One of the questions I have pondered a bit is how do you determine with the desired dough temp should be? If it is, for instance, 80 degrees, why?

John

It's a good question.

I think i'm going to have to stick a thermometer in the dough each day for a few weeks and try to monitor the corresponding quality of the dough. I know most of the time we have perfectly fermented dough - so I just need to find the dough temperature that leads me there.

This seems more rational than going with the recommended 75 F - as we are all using different amounts of yeast, fermentation times and temps, etc. If I just assume 75 F - I may as well start tweaking my recipe, workflow, etc. from scratch. I guess 75 F might be a nice guide if somebody is starting a fresh.

Once I have my desired dough temperature - i'll try changing the desired water temperature based on the formula given.
« Last Edit: June 24, 2013, 11:54:21 PM by jamieg »

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: The dark horse that is gluten development
« Reply #22 on: June 25, 2013, 08:57:21 AM »
Jamie;
As I always say, "Temperature control is the key to effective dough management". I'm betting that variations in finished dough temperature are creating greater differences in your dough than differences in kneading/mixing. A thermometer is cheap and it is easy to control finished dough temperature through minor adjustments in the temperature of the water that is added to make the dough. Depending upon how you are handling the dough after mixing, a difference of only a few degrees in finished dough temperature over 50+ hours can have a rather dramatic impact upon the finished dough at the time of use. If you are not already doing so, I would suggest getting a note book (baker's journal) to keep track of your experiments over time. This will allow you to get a better feel for your dough, and develop a history of what works and what doesn't work in your specific application. Be careful though, as you might end up like Norma, with the curiosity of a cat and never ending desire to improve upon your dough. Norma, please take that as the compliment that it's intended to be.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline norma427

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Re: The dark horse that is gluten development
« Reply #23 on: June 25, 2013, 10:28:21 PM »

Be careful though, as you might end up like Norma, with the curiosity of a cat and never ending desire to improve upon your dough. Norma, please take that as the compliment that it's intended to be.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor


Tom,

Thank you, I guess I do have a curiosity like a cat.  :-D  I also had problems with my dough balls today, but managed to take care of the problems.  If it isn't one thing it is another sometimes.

Jamie,

I also have a lot to learn and I don't think anyone is every done learning about pizza dough.

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!