Author Topic: Italian Sausage and Connective Tissue  (Read 2259 times)

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Online Chicago Bob

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Re: Italian Sausage and Connective Tissue
« Reply #21 on: June 04, 2013, 08:18:48 PM »
Kenji Lopez.  He's a cool guy!

http://slice.seriouseats.com/archives/2011/09/the-pizza-lab-why-does-sausage-need-to-be-salty.html

Sausage Recipe

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2011/09/juicy-sweet-or-hot-italian-sausage.html
Oh yeah, that guy!  ;D
I know you said you are wanting to start making more home made sausage Chau and that is great. I wouldn't hesitate for one minute to give Kenji's recipe a shot.....it looks like he's got all the right players in there(and then some but hopefully in a good way). I like that he toasted the fennel and included a 'lil Marjoram in there. He lists cayenne and pepper flakes for a "hot" version but you'll want a 'lil red pepper flakes in there just the same...skip the cayenne.
Anyway, solid recipe that will definitely get you in the ballpark to then do the Tran Man tweaking(which we know you gonna do :))
Grind is subjective; of course, but I always just use largest die and only 1 pass.
Good luck!  :chef:

ps. jus go buy you some Premio dude!  :-D    Ooooops....no sell out West.  >:(
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Italian Sausage and Connective Tissue
« Reply #22 on: June 04, 2013, 09:02:22 PM »
Bobby, I've made a few tweaks already minus the wine.  And this stuff is too good!  :drool: The flavor and texture is more robust and better than any store bought sausage I've tried.  I don't have a grinder but I can buy pork that is ground up rough from a local market.  Anyways, thought it was too much fennel the first time I made it, but it wasn't at all.  Garvey's recipe on this forum is similar to Kenji's and might even be based on it except with the addition of some white white wine, which I need to try!
Anyways, this sausage is delicious and super easy to make for anyone who has been curious about making your own sausage. 

Chau

Offline dhorst

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Re: Italian Sausage and Connective Tissue
« Reply #23 on: June 04, 2013, 09:14:19 PM »
Bobby, I've made a few tweaks already minus the wine.  And this stuff is too good!  :drool: The flavor and texture is more robust and better than any store bought sausage I've tried.  I don't have a grinder but I can buy pork that is ground up rough from a local market.  Anyways, thought it was too much fennel the first time I made it, but it wasn't at all.  Garvey's recipe on this forum is similar to Kenji's and might even be based on it except with the addition of some white white wine, which I need to try!
Anyways, this sausage is delicious and super easy to make for anyone who has been curious about making your own sausage. 

Chau

The wine is a beautiful addition.  It just pumps up the flavors. 

Offline Jim Sholtis

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Re: Italian Sausage and Connective Tissue
« Reply #24 on: July 03, 2013, 01:24:00 AM »
I worked at a Shakey's in St. Louis, MO. in the mid-seventies. At that time we were cutting up whole pork butts and running thru the Hobart grinder thru a plate that had 3/8 inch holes. After grinding once, we added the spice blend mix from Shakey's Corporate and blended by hand. I don't ever recall it being tough or sinewy. The Italian sausage spice mix that we used, I am presently trying to acquire a recipe for it. Like Jackie Tran and dhorst, we put raw sausage on our pizza's. Working at Shakey's was a part time job for me, but it was the job I worked the hardest at and enjoyed the most.  Jim

Offline gabaghool

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Re: Italian Sausage and Connective Tissue
« Reply #25 on: October 12, 2013, 12:12:59 PM »
I don't see any reason to slow cook sausage UNLESS you are flavoring a tomato sauce.  When you eat sausage that most italians prepare in sauce, as in a sub sandwich, the sausage is always very, very tender....thats because Italians usually simmer sausage in sauce for a few hours.  Thats why their sausage never has a snap to it.  If I get a sausage grinder with snap I know that the sausage is quickly cooked and simply covered with tomato sauce.  The flavor of properly cooked italian sausage is also much milder than a sausage thats been broiled.

Now, when most southern italians cook sausage and peppers, or a sausage prepared in a dish and NOT a sauce, it DOES have a snap, because the sausage is NOT simmered in sauce.  Even then, the sausage simply has BITE to it, never tough....all the connectives have been prepared in the grinding process.....its simply not as tender as simmered sausage....BUT, it retains much more flavor.

Sausage with peppers, or potatoes, I like broiled and serve.....sausage in sauce.....THAT i like fork tender....and a bit blander.....


 

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