Author Topic: Home made pizza oven.  (Read 2962 times)

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Offline theideman

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Re: Home made pizza oven.
« Reply #20 on: June 02, 2013, 04:19:45 PM »
Tom, do you know the BTU rating of the burner you finally went with?

Also, I'm curious, is this oven for personal use or are you considering selling it commercially?

I do not know the BTUs sorry, as i understand the BTU rating is more based on the wood burnt than the furnace. This project started as pizza oven for my home, but as more folks see it and like it, the more I am coincidering  making a few to sell.  I am more inventor - engineer than sales so I am not expecting much.



Offline shuboyje

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Re: Home made pizza oven.
« Reply #21 on: June 02, 2013, 04:41:26 PM »
I agree with the need for oversize heat source, we tested 3 sizes and our current size provides both enough heat but not over power the stone.  I have been testing and redesigning the deflector for three months still not happy though.  As for the low dome, I also use this oven for baking breads and other things, so the dome height was designed with multi purpose in mind.

What about a pizza centric addition?  I'm envisioning a pizza plate that slides into the oven on a couple simple rails.  It not only brings the flame closer to the top of the pizza, by changing the flame path in the oven it gives a much longer flame over the pie.  These two changes should super charge your top heat, allow higher deck temperatures and therefore drastically reduced bake times. 

I made a very crude drawing.
-Jeff

Offline theideman

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Re: Home made pizza oven.
« Reply #22 on: June 02, 2013, 07:12:06 PM »
What about a pizza centric addition?  I'm envisioning a pizza plate that slides into the oven on a couple simple rails.  It not only brings the flame closer to the top of the pizza, by changing the flame path in the oven it gives a much longer flame over the pie.  These two changes should super charge your top heat, allow higher deck temperatures and therefore drastically reduced bake times. 

I made a very crude drawing.


Thanks,  very interesting idea, the drawing  is no less crude than the ones I used to Fab the first oven.  My question is the long notch should go to the back oven?  I have had numerous issues with sheet metal warping due to the heat, do you have any idea of gauge  to start with?

This is why I posted this on this site.  Thanks for the idea.



Offline shuboyje

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Re: Home made pizza oven.
« Reply #23 on: June 02, 2013, 07:22:37 PM »
I put the notch on the front based on assumptions.  You mentioned the flame enters on three sides of the stone, I would assume based on your design those are the left, right and back.  If that assumption is correct placing the notch at the front will lead to a much longer flame path above the pizza.

It's funny you ask about the metal, in real life I am a sheet metal worker.  My first attempt would be 16 gauge with a cross brake.   
-Jeff

Offline theideman

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Re: Home made pizza oven.
« Reply #24 on: June 02, 2013, 07:48:35 PM »
I put the notch on the front based on assumptions.  You mentioned the flame enters on three sides of the stone, I would assume based on your design those are the left, right and back.  If that assumption is correct placing the notch at the front will lead to a much longer flame path above the pizza.

It's funny you ask about the metal, in real life I am a sheet metal worker.  My first attempt would be 16 gauge with a cross brake.

I will give it a try I will take a week or so but I will report back.

Tom

Offline synaesthesia

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Re: Home made pizza oven.
« Reply #25 on: June 04, 2013, 10:21:15 AM »
Temperature management is part of every oven... Wow, that's really deep. I don't know if I can get my head around that  ::)

I am the third person in this thread to point out the heat balance issue with this oven. Why are you attacking me and not them?

Hey, Jeff and Gene, stop being contrarian!  :-D

Oh do grow up. You are not the only one who went to school on this planet.

Offline slybarman

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Re: Home made pizza oven.
« Reply #26 on: June 04, 2013, 10:33:21 AM »
Oh do grow up. You are not the only one who went to school on this planet.


I am not sure I get why you are all up in Scott's butt. Scott has a lot of knowledge and experience and has been very generous with his time and knowledge helping people on this site (myself included) and asks for nothing in return.

Online scott123

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Re: Home made pizza oven.
« Reply #27 on: June 04, 2013, 07:56:14 PM »
I am not sure I get why you are all up in Scott's butt.


I wasn't sure as well, at first, but now I've figured it out. It's a Slice/Kenji fanboy thing

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=24374.0

Thanks for the kind words, Steve.

Online petef

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Re: Home made pizza oven.
« Reply #28 on: June 06, 2013, 12:49:42 AM »
If the stone is the first point of contact, then you've got a problem.  In bottom heat scenarios, forum members have spent countless hours finding ways to bounce the heat away from the stone and up and around to the top of the pizza.  Unless you're using very thick/poorly conductive materials such as firebrick, this is generally the only way to achieve a balanced bake.

Speaking of heat balance, a huge part of the top heat equation is the infrared radiation coming down from the ceiling of the oven.  Infrared is distance dependent. The farther from the pizza, the less impact. A high dome, such as yours, only compounds the heat imbalance issue caused by a bottom heat source/lack of deflection.  In a bottom heat scenario, the tallest you want the ceiling to be is 4", max.  Every inch further away from that and you're losing precious top browning ability.

Everyone,
I have some experience with making a homemade pizza oven that fits inside a Weber Genesis gas grill. I'm quoting Scott's reply above because I believe he's spot on. I totally support his notion of a 4" max ceiling height and his point about getting the heat to flow around the stone in order to get the desired top browning of the pizza.

Theideman, your craftsmanship, welding, and design is fantastic, but as soon as I saw the height of the ceiling, I was thinking that's way too tall. I say leave it as it is if it serves a dual purpose of bread making, but consider adding a track where you could slide in a second lower ceiling which would sit about 4 inches above the stone.

I can't tell from the current photos, but also make sure there is ample air flow on all 4 sides of the stone. This might also require that you have a front door that would close during the bake to ensure more even air (heat) flow flowing at the front of the stone.  See my pic below. I accomplish the same thing by closing the lid of my Weber Grill during the bake.

Great project! Fantastic craftsmanship!

EDIT: I just re-read your post and I see your oven is wood fired. My comments above are more for a oven where the heat source is underneath the stone. Could you please clarify how your heat source fits into your design.

---pete---
« Last Edit: June 06, 2013, 01:05:56 AM by petef »

Offline theideman

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Re: Home made pizza oven.
« Reply #29 on: June 06, 2013, 09:32:47 PM »
Everyone,
I have some experience with making a homemade pizza oven that fits inside a Weber Genesis gas grill. I'm quoting Scott's reply above because I believe he's spot on. I totally support his notion of a 4" max ceiling height and his point about getting the heat to flow around the stone in order to get the desired top browning of the pizza.

Theideman, your craftsmanship, welding, and design is fantastic, but as soon as I saw the height of the ceiling, I was thinking that's way too tall. I say leave it as it is if it serves a dual purpose of bread making, but consider adding a track where you could slide in a second lower ceiling which would sit about 4 inches above the stone.

I can't tell from the current photos, but also make sure there is ample air flow on all 4 sides of the stone. This might also require that you have a front door that would close during the bake to ensure more even air (heat) flow flowing at the front of the stone.  See my pic below. I accomplish the same thing by closing the lid of my Weber Grill during the bake.

Great project! Fantastic craftsmanship!

EDIT: I just re-read your post and I see your oven is wood fired. My comments above are more for a oven where the heat source is underneath the stone. Could you please clarify how your heat source fits into your design.

---pete---

I will give it a try I will take a week or so but I will report back.

Tom

Well I tested it and the shelf did not make any difference, as a matter of fact, the pizza without the shelf was more brown,  and done in less time.  I know more testing is required but the first test was obvious.  I think that the one fact that a lot of you are missing is that this oven uses the updraft caused by the chimney.  This draft draws the heat and flames into the oven chamber (I am going to try to get an image/video this weekend). The draft almost creates a forge like heat source.  I have 2 batches of crust made so I should have some opportunity to take pictures and videos.

Tom


Offline shuboyje

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Re: Home made pizza oven.
« Reply #30 on: June 07, 2013, 07:58:56 PM »
I can't speak for everyone, but I have a pretty strong understanding of natural draft, updraft, and airflow in general.  Your oven is generating a pressure differential in both vertical sections, and that is generating airflow.  I think the problem you experienced with the shelf is more then likely due to an increase in friction loss from the multiple bends it creates in the airflow.  I hoped the oven would draft well enough for it to be a non issue, but this must not be the case.  I think from the drawing I've made it is obvious that the oven with the plate in place would drastically increase the top heat IF the plate itself did not impair the airflow, lol.  Anything you do to increase the friction loss is like closing a damper, and in this case we closed the damper to far for this system.  My guess is it would take either a drastically bigger stack(in volume) or mechanical induction to overcome the issue. 
-Jeff

Offline Jet_deck

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Re: Home made pizza oven.
« Reply #31 on: June 07, 2013, 09:55:52 PM »
.... I think that the one fact that a lot of you are missing is that this oven uses the updraft caused by the chimney.  This draft draws the heat and flames into the oven chamber...

I disagree.  I have built big ovens with big exhaust stacks.  Nothing about your exhaust creates "draw".

Jeff is correct.  The hot air must be able to freely flow over the top of the pizza in a directed manner.
Her mind is Tiffany-twisted, she got the Mercedes bends

Offline theideman

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Re: Home made pizza oven.
« Reply #32 on: June 08, 2013, 08:03:52 AM »
I disagree.  I have built big ovens with big exhaust stacks.  Nothing about your exhaust creates "draw".

Jeff is correct.  The hot air must be able to freely flow over the top of the pizza in a directed manner.

I fired the pizza oven just to get some images and video for everyone.  Please no, I used the first prototype so I already know the dome is to high, I just want to show the flames.  Also when the oven dor is open the flames are reduced by about 60 percent.  I am just not fast enough to open the door and get the image before the flow changes.

Fire video:  https://mastergraphics.box.com/s/nupbou2q3bajxj2k2jqg



« Last Edit: June 08, 2013, 08:14:31 AM by theideman »


 

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