Author Topic: do you put butter in pizza or bread doughs?  (Read 1024 times)

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Offline preppystud

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do you put butter in pizza or bread doughs?
« on: June 09, 2013, 06:24:04 PM »
do butter make the dough fluffier comparing to vegetable oils, etc?

and how do i get the butter taste without using the butter? i have tried "i can't believe it is not butter", the bread that i made didn't have the butter taste although the product itself tastes like butter.


Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: do you put butter in pizza or bread doughs?
« Reply #1 on: June 09, 2013, 06:33:15 PM »
I would never put this stuff in pizza dough, but I use it all kinds of other baked goods to good effect. I use just enough so that people experience some special flavor that they can't identify.

http://www.amazon.com/Buttery-Sweet-Flavor-LorAnn-Oils/dp/B0018AKWZ4/?tag=pizzamaking-20

No idea if you'd like it in pizza.

 

Offline preppystud

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Re: do you put butter in pizza or bread doughs?
« Reply #2 on: June 09, 2013, 07:24:54 PM »
thanks for your response.

i didn't know that there are those kind of products before. now i will go to local stores and see if i can buy one.
« Last Edit: June 09, 2013, 07:29:21 PM by preppystud »

Offline Tatoosh

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Re: do you put butter in pizza or bread doughs?
« Reply #3 on: June 15, 2013, 12:13:00 AM »
I don't use butter except in baking or pastries.  I do prefer good lard if available.  My current dough recipe uses 2 tablespoons of olive oil, but I've been tempted to use lard in its place.  So far I've resisted the lard siren's song.  It's good in pies, great in tortillas, but I'm not so sure in pizza dough.
Banana Ketchup Is Not Pizza Sauce - Weber 22.5 OTG, Smokenator 1000, Kettle Pizza Insert, White Mountain 6qt Elec, Cuisinart ICE-20 1.5qt, FMS 1500D sous vide - Mabuhay Pizza!

Offline philipmason

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Re: do you put butter in pizza or bread doughs?
« Reply #4 on: June 20, 2013, 11:40:56 AM »
I tried a warm ferment dough recipe form on line, ignored the Lehmann limits and it used a large percentage of LARD. The flavor was outstanding, and not recognizable by the common public (I assume), and I seemingly could still taste in the morning (vivid imagination). Then I substituted oil the next time, not the same flavor.

I will experiment more with lard, as well as other types of oil (corn, canola, mixed...), but that lard taste was unique.

I know some of my local pizza shops use Crisco, I can smell it when I walk in the door, great crust, bad smell, to me.

I have a large percent oil  (> 5%) recipe that I like now, I use canola. I will substitute some and all for lard and get back.
Problem, I dont like cold ferment, takes too long. So mine are non standard, but I like, ha!

I strive for the non standard NY style, but by definition , mine is probably not NY even though I cook in 6 minutes, and TF of .070.

thank you all!








Offline TomN

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Re: do you put butter in pizza or bread doughs?
« Reply #5 on: June 20, 2013, 11:53:19 AM »
If you bake your pizza in a pan and butter flavor is what your after, remember there is Butter Flavored Crisco available.

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: do you put butter in pizza or bread doughs?
« Reply #6 on: June 20, 2013, 01:52:10 PM »
Like Tom N. said, Butter Flavored Crisco works well. I'm especially fond of using it in my wheat or multi-grain type crust formulas. If you want to get a pronounced dairy note without adding butter, see if you can get some dry buttermilk solids. When used at about 5% of the total flour weight it provides a great buttery flavor to the finished product. If you want to try it, but can't find it send me a message and I'll see what I can do for you. One of the problems with using lard today is that it is so highly refined so as to be essentially flavorless as compared to the way lard used to be. If you have a store that caters to the Latino taste you might be able to find some imported lard (good stuff). Or save your bacon drippings from your frying pan, it also gives a great flavor.
BTW: Liquid butter milk that you can buy at the supermarket doesn't provide the same level of flavor as the dried buttermilk solids (the drying process intensifies the flavor).
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor