Author Topic: help with choosing baking stone  (Read 2602 times)

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Offline waltertore

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help with choosing baking stone
« on: June 10, 2013, 09:16:17 PM »
A friend of mine wants to get into bread/pizza in a home oven and asked me what stone to get.  I am pretty ignorant in this area.  I have used dale tiles before but I know there is a ton of pizza stones out there.  He will be making NY style and artisan breads.  His oven goes to 550.  Thanks.  Walter


Offline TXCraig1

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Re: help with choosing baking stone
« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2013, 09:23:39 PM »
If I was going to buy a "stone" today, it would be a 1/2" steel plate. I have both a Fibrament stone (originally purchased for my grill mod where it worked very well) and a 1/2" Williams-Sonoma stone. Either will make 1 respectable NY pie in the oven at 550F, but after that the heat is shot, and you better wait 15-20 minutes between pies, or you're wasting your time and dough.
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Offline slybarman

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Re: help with choosing baking stone
« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2013, 09:39:41 PM »
I bought a 16"x16" x 3/4" thick cordeirite kiln shelf from a link posted here on the forum. It was about $43 delivered and I think it is great. It really holds the heat.


http://www.axner.com/cordierite-shelf-16x16x34square.aspx



« Last Edit: June 10, 2013, 09:43:13 PM by slybarman »

Offline Camaro10

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Re: help with choosing baking stone
« Reply #3 on: June 12, 2013, 03:56:46 PM »
I bought a 16"x16" x 3/4" thick cordeirite kiln shelf from a link posted here on the forum. It was about $43 delivered and I think it is great. It really holds the heat.


http://www.axner.com/cordierite-shelf-16x16x34square.aspx


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Offline waltertore

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Re: help with choosing baking stone
« Reply #4 on: June 12, 2013, 04:10:19 PM »
Thanks everyone for the input.   I sent the info to my friend.  I think he is going with the William Sonoma option.  Walter

Offline slybarman

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Re: help with choosing baking stone
« Reply #5 on: June 12, 2013, 04:14:45 PM »
My wife had bought me the one from there with the metal frame. It is too expensive and too thin. My pizzas improved once I went with the thicker stone.

Offline dmcavanagh

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Re: help with choosing baking stone
« Reply #6 on: June 12, 2013, 06:04:44 PM »
Scott123 linked me up with this recently   http://www.axner.com/cordierite-shelf-18x18x1square.aspx

Offline waltertore

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Re: help with choosing baking stone
« Reply #7 on: June 12, 2013, 06:24:17 PM »
Scott123 linked me up with this recently   http://www.axner.com/cordierite-shelf-18x18x1square.aspx



That one looks nice. I forwarded it to him.  I may have to get one for our home oven.  My blodgetts have 1.5" stones and I am spoiled with them and have pretty much given up home baking.  Walter

Offline dmcavanagh

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Re: help with choosing baking stone
« Reply #8 on: June 12, 2013, 06:31:05 PM »
I have to double check my oven dimensions, but if this will fit I'm ordering one. That 1" thickness is something you don't often see in  products sold as pizza stones.

Offline slybarman

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Re: help with choosing baking stone
« Reply #9 on: June 12, 2013, 07:00:16 PM »
Unfortunately 16" was deep as my oven would fit.


Online scott123

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Re: help with choosing baking stone
« Reply #10 on: June 13, 2013, 11:42:07 AM »
He will be making NY style and artisan breads.  His oven goes to 550.

Walter, before your friend purchases a stone, any stone, you should find out a few things:

1. There are some gas ovens that go to 550, but they have the broiler in a drawer underneath the oven.  If your friend has one of these, neither cordierite (the axner stone) or steel is a wise stone to purchase.

2. You had mentioned that you had never timed a bake, but you also said that you'd be baking within the next few weeks. Time a bake. Bake time dictates texture/oven spring.  If your friend wants to recreate your pie, then he needs to match the oven setup that will mirror your bake time, and, in order to do that, you first need to know your bake time.

Offline waltertore

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Re: help with choosing baking stone
« Reply #11 on: June 13, 2013, 01:27:21 PM »
Walter, before your friend purchases a stone, any stone, you should find out a few things:

1. There are some gas ovens that go to 550, but they have the broiler in a drawer underneath the oven.  If your friend has one of these, neither cordierite (the axner stone) or steel is a wise stone to purchase.

2. You had mentioned that you had never timed a bake, but you also said that you'd be baking within the next few weeks. Time a bake. Bake time dictates texture/oven spring.  If your friend wants to recreate your pie, then he needs to match the oven setup that will mirror your bake time, and, in order to do that, you first need to know your bake time.

Scott:  What difference does the broiler make-do you need it to finish the top to browness to the bottom?  He is an independent and wants to experiment on his own with it all so I am just giving him the basic dough recipe.   I orded one of the 18"x18"x1" stones you suggested.  Our home oven has the broiler on the top and goes to 550.  I was suppose to cook some pies today in my blodgetts for an event and when I got to school there was no power and it will be off at least a couple days due to construction on campus.   This meant the gas automatically turns off.  I was lucky to be there because I have a few hundred dollars of DOP Parmigiano reggiano and grande cheeses in the fridge.  I took them and the 10 dough balls home.  I am going to make pizza knots in the home oven on the dale tile squares and packed the cheeses into our fridge.  Thanks.  Walter

Online scott123

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Re: help with choosing baking stone
« Reply #12 on: June 13, 2013, 04:30:56 PM »
Walter, I recommended the axner stone for someone looking for a long baked, relatively low rise, crispy NY style pizza.  I know you don't push your blodgett's to their highest temp, but, even at the temp you're working at, I don't think you're in the low rise/crispy camp, and, if you're not, and, if that's not what your friend is striving for, then the kiln shelf might not be ideal.

We grew up in almost the same area.  While there were a few outliers, the NY style pizza we grew up with was not as crispy as the NY style pizza is today. Now, Star Tavern probably hasn't changed much, but that isn't NY style. Perhaps that has influenced you towards a crispier pie.  If it hasn't, you should resonate a bit more with puffy/chewy then crispy- and, if that's what you gravitate towards, and what your present friends gravitate towards, you need to purchase your stone carefully.

Offline waltertore

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Re: help with choosing baking stone
« Reply #13 on: June 13, 2013, 04:59:53 PM »
Scott:  I don't know what camp I am in :)  words are difficult to describe a texture and such for me because what is crisp for one may be chewy for another.  Here is a picture of my cheese pie from the blodgett run at 550. I agree star is not a NY style.  I dig it because it is so different yet still tastes great to me.  Walter

« Last Edit: June 13, 2013, 05:03:56 PM by waltertore »

Offline red kiosk

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Re: help with choosing baking stone
« Reply #14 on: June 13, 2013, 06:24:24 PM »
Unfortunately 16" was deep as my oven would fit.

Find someone that installs tile and has a ceramic saw. 1" cordierite is easily cut into what ever size you want. I just got through cutting this exact same piece of stone (18" x 18" x 1") into multiple pieces. If the ceramic/tile table saw has a fine diamond blade, there will be no chips. I was totally amazed at what the finished pieces looked like. Crisp, sharp edges and corners, like it was cut from wood. Hope this helps and take care!

Jim
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Offline red kiosk

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Re: help with choosing baking stone
« Reply #15 on: June 13, 2013, 06:33:47 PM »
Also, for those willing to spend the money for 1.5" thickness, these are available and it looks like they will also cut it done to whatever size you want. They also have 16" x 16" x 1.5" available.

http://www.californiapizzastones.com/pizza/stones/single-pizza-baking-stone.php?stoneNum=sq16c

http://www.californiapizzastones.com/pizza/stones/single-pizza-baking-stone.php?stoneNum=sq18e

Overpriced for just cordierite kiln shelves, but the only place that I have seen that has 1.5"thick  cordierite available. Once again, hope this helps someone and take care!

Jim
« Last Edit: June 13, 2013, 06:36:17 PM by red kiosk »
The pathologically precise are annoying, but right!

Offline slybarman

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Re: help with choosing baking stone
« Reply #16 on: June 13, 2013, 08:13:20 PM »
Find someone that installs tile and has a ceramic saw. 1" cordierite is easily cut into what ever size you want. I just got through cutting this exact same piece of stone (18" x 18" x 1") into multiple pieces. If the ceramic/tile table saw has a fine diamond blade, there will be no chips. I was totally amazed at what the finished pieces looked like. Crisp, sharp edges and corners, like it was cut from wood. Hope this helps and take care!

Jim


Thank you. I have the 16x16x3/4" and I think that is good enough for now. I think I will buy apiece of steel to try out next.

Offline waltertore

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Re: help with choosing baking stone
« Reply #17 on: June 17, 2013, 11:36:16 AM »
Again thanks for all the replies!  I ordered this stone and it should be here any day.  Is there any special prep I need to do with it beforehand?   Walter

http://www.axner.com/cordierite-shelf-18x18x1square.aspx

Offline slybarman

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Re: help with choosing baking stone
« Reply #18 on: June 17, 2013, 12:24:40 PM »
Nope. I ran mine through 1 heat cycle just to cook off anything that might have been on it.

Offline waltertore

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Re: help with choosing baking stone
« Reply #19 on: June 18, 2013, 02:27:17 PM »
I got my stone today and it fits perfect on the bottom oven rack.  I bought some locally grown, milled, bread flour at the farmers market this weekend and will give the stone a run with some bread tomorrow.  Walter


 

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