Author Topic: My ultimate Detroit style dough, frozen no less  (Read 1131 times)

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Offline widespreadpizza

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My ultimate Detroit style dough, frozen no less
« on: June 11, 2013, 10:22:51 AM »
Here it is folks,  pictures come next time I bake.  Been making this one for a while now and wanted to share.  I do not know exactly why this dough works so well,  but it just does.  I used to have a lot of time on my hands for pizzamaking,  but for the last couple years have not.  This is my solution for pizza on demand.  I sure hope some of you try it.  Absolutely the most forgiving dough I have ever made or used,  and so so simple.  When I make this dough,  i make 16 balls at a time in my bosch,  hence the on demand,  if I know I want pizza on a given night I take and put bag on granite counter whenever I decide in the morning. 

50% malted bread flour
50% extra fancy durum wheat flour,  general mills
66% water
.55  ADY  not rehydrated
2% salt kosher
3 % neutral oil been using veg.
.0055% asorbic acid powder. I enter this under the sugar field in the calc.  you do need a gram scale for this part,  but it may be what makes it.
for 8x10" pan 300g balls.

into ziplocks,  freeze as fast as possible,  except for the ones you want to use immediately,  personally,  when I do get around to making dough,  I rarely do not eat some of it within 24 hours.

fresh dough tr rise for the day or cold proof for 1-2 days.  warm then pan about 2 hours prior to baking.  I have been baking at 435,  no stone.

ready anywhere from 1 day if you leave them out all day,  or up to 5 days if you put them in the fridge.

BTW last batch I made of this dough lasted for over two months in the freezer with no noticeable performance difference.

Let me know if you have any questions.  Norma,  this one will work for you and save you a lot of time! -marc





Offline norma427

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Re: My ultimate Detroit style dough, frozen no less
« Reply #1 on: June 11, 2013, 10:02:51 PM »

Norma,  this one will work for you and save you a lot of time! -marc


Marc,

It sounds great if you found a way to freeze Detroit style dough right after the dough is made.   ;D  I really like your method since you have "dough on demand".

I have to look, but I think I froze some of my Detroit style dough balls, but that was after they had fermented at the end of a market day.  I think that method didn't work out for me.  I wonder since I am using a higher hydration and IDY in higher amounts if your method would work for me at market.  I don't use any oil in my Detroit style dough either. 

Do you think your method works because you don't rehydrate the ADY.


Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline widespreadpizza

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Re: My ultimate Detroit style dough, frozen no less
« Reply #2 on: June 11, 2013, 10:16:49 PM »
Norma,  I do think that not hydrating the ADY helps the frozen dough performance.  In my experience,  and in the industry in general,  always best to freeze before fermentation starts.  As far as hydration goes,  I think that this is perfect,  fully cooked,  no sogginess whatsoever.  Also,  the oil could be optional I suppose,  if you were to not use it,  maybe go to 68-69% water.  For me I found the leftovers to be better with the oil,  not that I have them very often.  I did want to point out that I am dead set on this recpie because it is at a point where i do not think I can improve it further,  a point I have never reached with any other dough recpie frozen or otherwise  I do hope you try it out,  and if you do not have the ef semolina,  just try it out with bread...  Thanks -marc

Offline norma427

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Re: My ultimate Detroit style dough, frozen no less
« Reply #3 on: June 11, 2013, 10:58:57 PM »
Marc,

I know it is always better to freeze before fermentation starts.  I think I learned that in the Mellow Mushroom thread, if I recall right.  Thanks for telling me that you are at the point where you do not think you can improve more.  I don't think I can find semolina in my area, but could just try bread flour.  I would be interested in trying your method and formulation as soon as I find time.

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: My ultimate Detroit style dough, frozen no less
« Reply #4 on: June 12, 2013, 11:08:53 AM »
What marc says about freezing dough before fermenting is the way that is traditionally used by commercial producers of frozen dough balls. However, some time ago, Cook's Illustrated conducted some experiments in which it froze dough balls right after making and also after they had fermented. I incorporated the results of those tests in Reply 2 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,10056.msg89496/topicseen.html#msg89496. Subsequently, Norma found the PMQ article by Jeff Zeak at http://www.pmqmag-digital.com/pmqmag/201209#pg16 that also discusses some of the most effective ways of freezing dough. When Norma and I made the Mellow Mushroom dough balls, they were frozen right after making them. However, it would seem to me that marc might be able to make a version of his Detroit style pizza dough and cold ferment it for up to 48 hours, and then freeze. The cold fermentation of the dough should provide a fair amount of byproducts of fermentation to contribute to the final crust flavor, color, taste and texture. I think that that method would also work at a commercial level.

As far as the shelf life of frozen dough is concerned, I think that depends on the type of freezer used and whatever else is held in the freezer compartment at the same time as the frozen dough balls. Most modern refrigerators have defrost cycles that can degrade the quality of the product frozen over prolonged periods of time due to the repetitive on/off cycling of the defrost function. This deterioration will take place faster if the freezer is not full most of the time. So, I would say that the best results might be achieved by using a standalone freezer or an old-time refrigerator with manual defrost. In my case, I have found that dough balls do not do well after freezing in my refrigerator freezer compartment for more than a few weeks. Beyond that, they are virtually unusable.

Peter


 

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