Author Topic: My Basic Dough - adapting to hotter oven?  (Read 741 times)

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Offline Tatoosh

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My Basic Dough - adapting to hotter oven?
« on: June 15, 2013, 12:32:54 AM »
We have used this dough for a long time, primarily when we were baking pizzas in our kitchen oven.  Now we are doing it in our Weber/PizzaKettle with much higher temperatures.  Before we prebaked our crusts, then topped them and finished.  This gave a thinner, but not cracker, crust with some nice structure. 

When we moved to the hotter Weber, we started getting much more rise out of the dough.  We did one thing different with the dough though.  We allowed it to rise overnight in the refrigerator.  It doubled in size. 

Our Dough Recipe:

1 envelope active dry yeast - approx. 2 1/2 tsp
1 cup warm water
1 1/2 tsp sugar
2 1/2 cup AP flour
2 tbsp olive oil (we often substitute local palm oil)
1 tsp salt

Normally we make a poolish a few hours before.  We did not for the last one, allowing the slow rise in the refrigerator to add more flavor, which it seemed to do.  We expect to do at least a short poolish before mixing the dough, and to keep the overnight in refrigerator rise. 

Poolish = 1/2 cup water, 1/2 cup flour, 1/4 tsp yeast. 

Assemble the dough by adding remaining ingredients to poolish.  We used to knead by hand, but with a new KA stand mixer available, we are letting it do most of the work.  We added extra flour, about 1/4 cup per batch.  We are at 5000 feet elevation, but usually with a fairly high humidity - 80% to 95% most of the time.  Flour is usually the local AP variety, since it is always repackaged, impossible to know the manufacturer/miller.  High end flour here is Gold Medal AP.  For 3 pizzas, we do a double batch of this recipe. 

Forming the initial pie is done by rolling.  We don't have tossing or hand stretching techniques down, but would love to see demos on you-tube recommendations.  Currently we are stretching on a stainless prep table, not the ideal surface.  I hope to get a small slab of polished marble to use for stretching in the future.  Suggestions for something portable and easy to store for stretching would be greatly welcomed.

I really wanted to go for a Neapolitan or New York style pizza.  Our dough is puffing up much more than those, but given my long term preference for thinner pizzas, the crust was actually pretty good, not doughy or thick, but with some nice structure.  The crust was spotted and crispy for the most part, the interior of the pie was softer.   Any substitution recipes for dough - along the Neapolitan/New York line, or American pizza crust would be great. 

I will, as time permits, try to learn the dough analyzer and become adept enough to give percentages in the future.  But I'd like to come up with something that has a nice flavor and gives me a good cornice but is fold-able for eating.   
« Last Edit: June 15, 2013, 12:46:47 AM by Tatoosh »
Banana Ketchup Is Not Pizza Sauce - Weber 22.5 OTG, Smokenator 1000, Kettle Pizza Insert, White Mountain 6qt Elec, Cuisinart ICE-20 1.5qt, FMS 1500D sous vide - Mabuhay Pizza!


Online Tscarborough

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Re: My Basic Dough - adapting to hotter oven?
« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2013, 11:32:36 AM »
Drop the sugar and the oil and, possibly, up the hydration and you will be good.

Offline Tatoosh

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Re: My Basic Dough - adapting to hotter oven?
« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2013, 01:11:48 AM »
Thanks, Tscarborough ... I'll give that a try.  We did a second run last night on the Weber/KettlePizza setup.  Overall, it went quite well.  I have a small bag of semolina flour I use on the peel to help the pizza slide off the peel.  But it is way too expensive here in the Philippines to use it as an ingredient in the pizza dough.  We followed the regular procedures, using a 6 hour poolish, plus an overnight slow rise in the refrigerator. 

The dough structure was good, nice and airy, but without much flavor.  I had a friend over and he commented on two things that need improvement with the Weber/KettlePizza and my current recipes.  First was the dough's flavor.  He suggested adding herbs or something to kick it up a bit.  I will look at that down the road, but I really want to get as much flavor as possible from my crust on its own.  Since I make my own "microwave mozzarella", I checking into using the whey from that to use in the dough, replacing some of the water, to see if that will add some depth of flavor.

The second thing he mentioned was more heat on the top.  We got the mozzarella to melt nicely, but I have plans to add more heat than available from the convection of the hot air traveling over the pizza.  If I get it working' I'll post on that in a different thread.
« Last Edit: June 17, 2013, 01:15:48 AM by Tatoosh »
Banana Ketchup Is Not Pizza Sauce - Weber 22.5 OTG, Smokenator 1000, Kettle Pizza Insert, White Mountain 6qt Elec, Cuisinart ICE-20 1.5qt, FMS 1500D sous vide - Mabuhay Pizza!


 

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