Author Topic: Trying to have a similar taste for a Papa John's Garlic Sauce, but not cloned  (Read 12624 times)

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Offline norma427

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Maybe try mixing the 2 together to tone the garlic?

Bob,

You are right that may might work to tone down the garlic taste, but I still have to figure out how to get the Whirl products thicker.

Norma
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Online Pete-zza

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Norma,

Before proceeding further, did you like the flavors of the two Whirl products and, if so, did you like the flavor of the garlic Whirl product better than the PJ Garlic sauce? Also, can you compare the flavor of the garlic Whirl product with your most recent alternative PJ Garlic sauce?

Bob makes a good suggestion for toning down the garlic flavor. However, if a thickening agent is added to either Whirl product, or even a blend of the two Whirl products, the thickening agent might itself tone down the garlic flavor.

Peter

Offline norma427

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Norma,

Before proceeding further, did you like the flavors of the two Whirl products and, if so, did you like the flavor of the garlic Whirl product better than the PJ Garlic sauce? Also, can you compare the flavor of the garlic Whirl product with your most recent alternative PJ Garlic sauce?

Bob makes a good suggestion for toning down the garlic flavor. However, if a thickening agent is added to either Whirl product, or even a blend of the two Whirl products, the thickening agent might itself tone down the garlic flavor.

Peter

Peter,

I liked the flavors of both of the Whirl products.  I do like the PJ Garlic sauce better than the flavor of the garlic Whirl product.  Maybe that is just because I have become accustomed to the taste of the PJ Garlic sauce.  I think my recent attempt the PJ Garlic sauce tasted almost like the real thing and really don't like the extra garlicky flavor of the garlic Whirl product.  I do like garlic very much, but for some reason the garlic Whirl was a little too strong in the garlic department for me.  The garlic Whirl would probably be great for grilling or frying.

I didn't think about a thickening agent toning down the garlic flavor in the garlic Whirl product.

Norma
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Online Chicago Bob

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Peter,
I am just getting into discovering the baking products available for folks doing the low carb thing. There is/was a fantastic sounding product called "Thickenthin"; it's a replacement for carby cornstarch and has the ability to thicken even cold liquids. Unfortunately, that company is no longer in business.Wonder if there is some sort of other thickener(not necessarily low carb)that Norma could use(not have to cook her garlic sauce).
I'm waiting on an order I placed for a new substitute for the thickenthin but this new product only mentions being used in "heated' sauces, gravies,soups,etc..
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Online Pete-zza

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I am just getting into discovering the baking products available for folks doing the low carb thing. There is/was a fantastic sounding product called "Thickenthin"; it's a replacement for carby cornstarch and has the ability to thicken even cold liquids. Unfortunately, that company is no longer in business.Wonder if there is some sort of other thickener(not necessarily low carb)that Norma could use(not have to cook her garlic sauce).
I'm waiting on an order I placed for a new substitute for the thickenthin but this new product only mentions being used in "heated' sauces, gravies,soups,etc..
Bob,

Initially, I was thinking of some form of starch, maybe arrowroot, but I had not seen starches used with margarine products. What I did recall is that some of the newer, fancier margarine spreads with low trans fats use xanthan gum, guar gum or glycerin. Norma mentioned the possibility of using the Parkay Squeeze product but that may not be thick enough to do the job, or too much of it might have to be used to thicken the Whirl products and that could change the overall profile of the end product. My current thinking is to perhaps use a normal margarine stick product that has many of the same ingredients as the PJ Garlic sauce. The stick product could be be softened a bit at room temperature or in the microwave to facilitate blending with the Whirl products. Possibilities include cheap stick margarine products such as Blue Bonnet or Parkay. Both of those products are made by ConAgra, which also makes the Parkay Squeeze product. I have discovered that supermarkets often do not carry all margarine products under a given brand name, and their compositions can change over time, so one will have to look at the ingredients on the labels of the products carried to be sure that they are the right ones to use for blending purposes. If a stick margarine product works, it may still be necessary to tweak the final product for flavor. It's all a trial and error kind of thing.

Peter

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I just came across this....http://www.reliablemedsupplies.com/supply.cfm/Office-Supplies/Office-Supplies/THICK-IT-ORIGINAL-THICKENER-PWD-10-OZ-MIIJ584H.html

I'm supposed to receive my low carb shipment today and if the thickenthin substitute does not thicken cold liquids I will be getting some of the "Thick-It" stuff. I can report about it or do an experiment if needed for Norma's possible use.
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Online Pete-zza

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The other day, while I was in one of my local supermarkets, I looked for the cheapest stick margarine product that I could find. I did that because I came to the conclusion that Papa John's was also using a cheap margarine product for its PJ Garlic sauce, along with garlic and a buttery component, either natural or artificial (or maybe both). The cheapest stick margarine that I found sold for $0.69 for one pound. It was for a 52% oil product with the following ingredients:

Fiesta Brand Spread: Liquid and partially hydrogenated soybean oil, water, salt, vegetable mono & diglycerides, soy lecithin, potassium sorbate and sodium benzoate (as preservatives), citric acid, natural and artificial flavor, beta carotene (color), Vitamin A palmitate added, whey.

For comparison purposes, this is the composition of the current PJ Garlic sauce:

Current Version of PJ Garlic Sauce (2013): Soybean oil, water, salt, contains less than 2% of garlic*, vegetable mono & diglycerides, natural & artificial flavor, partially hydrogenated soybean oil, soy lecithin, lactic acid, sodium benzoate (a preservative), calcium disodium EDTA added to protect flavor, citric acid, carotene(color), Vitamin A palmitate added. *Dehydrated

And, for the Parkay Squeeze product:

Parkay Squeeze: LIQUID SOYBEAN OIL, WATER, SALT, HYDROGENATED COTTONSEED OIL, VEGETABLE MONOGLYCERIDES AND SOY LECITHIN (EMULSIFIERS), POTASSIUM SORBATE AND SODIUM BENZOATE (TO PRESERVE FRESHNESS), ARTIFICIAL FLAVOR, PHOSPHORIC ACID (ACIDULANT), COLORED WITH BETA CAROTENE (SOURCE OF VITAMIN A), VITAMIN A PALMITATE

I estimate that I have looked at well over a hundred different margarine products. And at each store I visited, I made a point of looking for the cheapest margarine stick product sold. It appears that no one wants to sell a cheap, barebones margarine product anymore, either a national brand or a house brand. Fiesta was the only store I visited willing to offer such a product.

For further comparisons, here are the ingredients for a basic Blue Bonnet (65%) and Parkay (65%) stick product:

Blue Bonnet: Soybean(s) Oil Liquid, Soybean(s) Oil Partially Hydrogenated, Water, Whey, Salt, Vegetable(s) Mono and Diglycerides An Emulsifier, Soy Lecithin An Emulsifier, Potassium Sorbate To Preserve Freshness, Sodium Benzoate To Preserve Freshness, Flavor(s) Artificial, Phosphoric Acid, Vitamin A Palmitate Colored With, Beta Carotene.

Parkay: Liquid Soybean Oil, Partially Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, Water, Whey, Salt, Vegetable Mono- And Diglycerides And Soy Lecithin (Emulsifiers), Potassium Sorbate And Sodium Benzoate (To Preserve Freshness), Artificial Flavor, Phosphoric Acid (Acidulant), Vitamin A Palmitate, Colored With Beta Carotene (Source Of Vitamin A).

Peter
« Last Edit: July 20, 2013, 08:23:09 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline norma427

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Peter,

Do you just want me to try the Blue Bonnet or Parkay margarine first to see how one of them might work?  I don't recall that I ever saw the Fiesta Brand at my local supermarkets.

Norma
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Online Pete-zza

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Do you just want me to try the Blue Bonnet or Parkay margarine first to see how one of them might work?  I don't recall that I ever saw the Fiesta Brand at my local supermarkets.
Norma,

I couldn't think of any other way to thicken the Whirl products without significantly adding to costs and at the same time stay within earshot of of the PJ Garlic sauce. I knew that you wouldn't be able to find the Fiesta product since Fiesta is the name of the supermarket. The Fiesta stick product I mentioned is their house brand. In your case, you might check where you shop to see if there is another house brand like the Fiesta product. The Blue Bonnet and Parkay stick products seem to be the next step up from the cheap house brands from the standpoint of price, so that is why I mentioned them (along with their ingredients). In my research, I found other brands with similar compositions that might work but the stores near me do not carry them. The reality is that on the Internet you will find just about every margarine product that was ever sold but your local supermarket will only have a very small subset. And the composition of that subset various from store to store, apparently based on what its customers buy.

Peter

Online Pete-zza

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I just came across this....http://www.reliablemedsupplies.com/supply.cfm/Office-Supplies/Office-Supplies/THICK-IT-ORIGINAL-THICKENER-PWD-10-OZ-MIIJ584H.html

Bob,

That is an interesting product. I wondered what was in it, so I did a Google search. According to http://www.wegmans.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?productId=756753&storeId=10052&langId=-1, the ingredients are modified food starch and maltodextrine. I don't know how much of the product would be needed to thicken a product like the Whirl product (regular or garlic) but it apparently wouldn't alter the flavors. It also isn't clear whether the thickening effect is permanent or it degrades with time and storage.

Peter


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Bob,

That is an interesting product. I wondered what was in it, so I did a Google search. According to http://www.wegmans.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?productId=756753&storeId=10052&langId=-1, the ingredients are modified food starch and maltodextrine. I don't know how much of the product would be needed to thicken a product like the Whirl product (regular or garlic) but it apparently wouldn't alter the flavors. It also isn't clear whether the thickening effect is permanent or it degrades with time and storage.

Peter
That product is a substitute for the no longer available "Thickenthin"....all I know right now is that the Thickenthin site was saying that their product wouldn't break/separate after refrigerating and also that it is used in very small amounts.
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Offline norma427

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Norma,

I couldn't think of any other way to thicken the Whirl products without significantly adding to costs and at the same time stay within earshot of of the PJ Garlic sauce. I knew that you wouldn't be able to find the Fiesta product since Fiesta is the name of the supermarket. The Fiesta stick product I mentioned is their house brand. In your case, you might check where you shop to see if there is another house brand like the Fiesta product. The Blue Bonnet and Parkay stick products seem to be the next step up from the cheap house brands from the standpoint of price, so that is why I mentioned them (along with their ingredients). In my research, I found other brands with similar compositions that might work but the stores near me do not carry them. The reality is that on the Internet you will find just about every margarine product that was ever sold but your local supermarket will only have a very small subset. And the composition of that subset various from store to store, apparently based on what its customers buy.

Peter

Peter,

Thanks for telling me you couldn't think of any other way to thicken the Whirl products without significantly adding to the cost and at the same time staying within earshot of the PJ Garlic sauce.  I didn't know that the Fiesta product was the brand name of the Fiesta supermarket.  When I go to look at margarine products tomorrow I will look and see what the house brand ingredients are of their margarine.  I understand that in reality that on the Internet almost any margarine products that was ever sold would be able to be found, but at local supermarkets they can't be found. 

I will have to print out what ingredients there will have to be in the house brand margarine, or either just purchase Parkay or Blue Bonnet margarine.

Norma
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Offline norma427

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I just came across this....http://www.reliablemedsupplies.com/supply.cfm/Office-Supplies/Office-Supplies/THICK-IT-ORIGINAL-THICKENER-PWD-10-OZ-MIIJ584H.html

I'm supposed to receive my low carb shipment today and if the thickenthin substitute does not thicken cold liquids I will be getting some of the "Thick-It" stuff. I can report about it or do an experiment if needed for Norma's possible use.


Bob,

I also find the product for thickening you found interesting.  My late husband had to have swallow tests every couple of months so they could see if he could eat any soft foods.  He only could be on a feeding tube for a long while.  I recall they thickened applesauce and other soft foods with something for those swallowing tests, but never knew what they used to thicken those different soft foods.

Norma
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Bob,

That is an interesting product. I wondered what was in it, so I did a Google search. According to http://www.wegmans.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?productId=756753&storeId=10052&langId=-1, the ingredients are modified food starch and maltodextrine. I don't know how much of the product would be needed to thicken a product like the Whirl product (regular or garlic) but it apparently wouldn't alter the flavors. It also isn't clear whether the thickening effect is permanent or it degrades with time and storage.

Peter
Found this.....

Thick-It Food Thickener Powder Thick-It food thickener is ideal for adding a thicker consistency to foods, providing a more enjoyable eating experience for people with dysphagia or swallowing disorders. Thick-It thickens hot or cold, thin or thick liquids and pureed food to any desired consistency quickly, easily and controllably. Dry mix powder won t lump or affect flavor to allow customizing mixture appropriate to user s needs and is freeze-thaw stable. No fluid binding to affect hydration and is Kosher approved. Simply add the desired amount while stirring briskly and wait 30 seconds for food to thicken. Depending upon the amount of product you use, you can arrive at nectar, honey or pudding consistencies. Thicken everything from fruit juices to carbonated beverages to milk, drink mixes, tea, coffee, lemonade, broth and pureed vegetables. Thick-It is the No. 1 selling brand that revolutionized dysphagia care; that is, the needs of people who have swallowing problems. Thick-It is ideal for any health care environment as well as for home use. Thick-It Food Thickener Features: Won't cause aspiration Dissolves instantly Won't over-thicken Contributes calories Won't bind liquids, hydrates Doesn't change appearance or taste Convenient Packaging Thick-It is recommended by doctors, speech-language pathologists and dietitians.
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Online Pete-zza

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I will have to print out what ingredients there will have to be in the house brand margarine, or either just purchase Parkay or Blue Bonnet margarine.
Norma,

While I was at the market today, I paid another visit to the margarine section. There I was able to find another candidate for use as a thickening agent, Fleischmann's Original stick margarine, with 65% oil. I had seen the Fleischman's Original stick margarine before in supermarkets but one of the main ingredients when I read the labels was always corn oil. What I found today uses only soybean oil. The ingredient are as follows:

Fleischmann's Original: Liquid Soybean Oil, Partially Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, Whey, Salt, Vegetable Mono- And Diglycerides And Soy Lecithin (Emulsifiers), Sodium Benzoate (To Preserve Freshness), Natural And Artificial Flavor, Vitamin A Palmitate, Colored With Beta Carotene (Source Of Vitamin A), Vitamin D3.

You will note that many of the margarine products I have mentioned include whey. I believe that the use of whey is a rather inexpensive way of getting more flavor in the margarine product. Some brands use more or less whey--in either its natural form with water or in dry form--than other brands. More expensive products, such as from Land O Lakes, will often use cream and/or buttermilk, and some will use dry milk powder. What is missing from some of these products is acidulants, such as citric and lactic acids. These give the margarine products a bit of tang. One of the reasons for pursuing the McCormick butter flavoring product is because it includes lactic acid, which is a major ingredient in the PJ Garlic sauce.

FYI, The Fleischmann's Original stick margarine is also produced by ConAgra.

Peter
« Last Edit: July 21, 2013, 09:22:11 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline norma427

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Norma,

While I was at the market today, I paid another visit to the margarine section. There I was able to find another candidate for use as a thickening agent, Fleischmann's Original stick margarine, with 65% oil. I had seen the Fleischman's Original stick margarine before in supermarkets but one of the main ingredients when I read the labels was always corn oil. What I found today uses only soybean oil. The ingredient are as follows:

Fleischmann's Original: Liquid Soybean Oil, Partially Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, Whey, Salt, Vegetable Mono- And Diglycerides And Soy Lecithin (Emulsifiers), Sodium Benzoate (To Preserve Freshness), Natural And Artificial Flavor, Vitamin A Palmitate, Colored With Beta Carotene (Source Of Vitamin A), Vitamin D3.

You will note that many of the margarine products I have mentioned include whey. I believe that the use of whey is a rather inexpensive way of getting more flavor in the margarine product. Some brands use more or less whey--in either its natural form with water or in dry form--than other brands. More expensive products, such as from Land O Lakes, will often use cream and/or buttermilk. What is missing from some of these products is acidulants, such as citric and lactic acids. These give the margarine products a bit of tang. One of the reasons for pursuing the McCormick butter flavoring product is because it includes lactic acid, which is a major ingredient in the PJ Garlic sauce.

FYI, The Fleischmann's Original stick margarine is also produced by ConAgra.

Peter

Peter,

I appreciate you helping to find a margarine product that will go with the Whirl products.  I find it interesting that Fleischman's Original stick margarine now uses only soybean oil instead of corn oil. 

I see that many of the margarine products you have mentioned include whey.  I didn't know the use of whey is a rather inexpensive way of getting more flavor in the margarine product.  I didn't know either what is missing in some of these products is acidulant, such as citric and lactic acids and they give the margarine products a bit of tang.  Wouldn't the whey maybe include some acidulants?  I know when I make attempts at making cheese I need some citric acid and maybe a rennet product, but not always the rennet to turn the milk into whey and curds. 

I hope I soon receive the McCormick butter flavoring product to try out.  If I soon don't receive the McCormick butter flavoring I will send an email or call again. 

In the meantime, are any of the margarine products that you mentioned (Parkay, Blue Bonnet, or Fleischman's Original stick margarine) okay to start with, or do you have a preference at which one I should try first?

Norma
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Online Pete-zza

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In the meantime, are any of the margarine products that you mentioned (Parkay, Blue Bonnet, or Fleischman's Original stick margarine) okay to start with, or do you have a preference at which one I should try first?
Norma,

I have been pondering your question since you posted it. Before giving you an answer, I'd like to mention some of the obstacles I have observed when considering the use of the Whirl products to make a garlic sauce that has acceptable consistency, flavor and mouthfeel.

First, the two Whirl products are essentially all fat (oil). Nominally, based on the Nutrition Facts, a sample size is 14 grams and the Total Fat is 14 grams. That suggests 100% oil but that is only because of rounding factors. I estimate that the oil content is more like 96-97% soybean oil. By contrast, I estimate the soybean oil used to make the PJ Garlic sauce to be around 60%. Second, all of the soybean oil in the Whirl products are partially hydrogenated. But not enough to make the products thick, or at least not thick enough to use alone. You can't have the sauce drip off of the dough during baking or when eaters dip their crusts into the sauce on the side.

The three margarine products I mentioned (Blue Bonnet, Parkay and Fleischmann's) are all 65% oil margarine spreads. That means that the soybean oil is 65% of the products. Adding any one of those products to the Whirl products to make it thicker will further increase the Total Fats (and Sat Fats and Trans Fats) of the blend. As things now stand, the Whirl products by themselves, without supplementation, have about 2/3 more total fat than the PJ Garlic sauce.

The advantage of the three margarine products mentioned above is that they are in stick form and solid. If you leave a sample of any one of those products at room temperature for any appreciable time, such as overnight, in due course they will soften but show little tendency to spread (it might slump somewhat if you use an entire stick). If you do the same thing with the Parkay Squeeze product, which has 60% oil, it will spread and the liquid soybean oil will separate from the total mass.

My inclination is to try using either the Blue Bonnet stick product or the Parkay stick product. Their compositions are very similar. They also have an acidulant (phosphoric acid), which the Fleischmann's Original stick product does not.

When you go to the supermarket, you might note that there are Blue Bonnet and Parkay products that have a lower oil contents than discussed above. For example, there is a 53% Blue Bonnet margarine spread that has a composition similar to those discussed above. The ingredients for that particular product are as follows:

Blue Bonnet (53%): Vegetable Oil Blend (Liquid Soybean Oil, Partially Hydrogenated Soybean Oil), Water, Salt, Contains Less than 2% of the Following: Dried Whey, Vegetable Mono- and Diglycerides and Soy Lecithin (Emulsifiers), Potassium Sorbate and Sodium Benzoate (to Preserve Freshness), Phosphoric Acid (Acidulant), Natural and Artificial Flavor, Vitamin A Palmitate, Colored with Beta Carotene (Source of Vitamin A), Flaxseed Oil.

You will note that the 53% Blue Bonnet product contains flaxseed oil. However, it is the last ingredient in the list of ingredients so it is unlikely to be detectable in the finished product. A possible advantage of the 53% Blue Bonnet is that it might add less oil to the final blend. If there is too much oil, that might not sit well from a mouthfeel standpoint, and possibly also from a taste standpoint.

Whichever margarine stick product you decide to use, I think I would take a sample of the Whirl garlic product, for example, two ounces, and add the stick margarine product you decide to use, after letting it soften enough to handle, to the Whirl product until you feel you have the right consistency. For future reference, you will want to note how much of the margarine product you used to achieve the desired consistency, if that is, in fact, achievable. You should then taste the final blend to see if the buttery and garlic flavors are as you would like them, and also if the salt content is sufficient. Your taste test might suggest the need for some tweaking of the flavors. You should also note the mouthfeel.

If the above doesn't work to your satisfaction, and a better solution does not jump out at you from your tests, then it may be necessary to consider some other solution. But whatever that solution might be, it should be a low cost solution. Of course, with four jugs of free Whirl products, you could sustain some added costs for some time.

Peter

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Peter,

I took a photo of the Ingredient list of the Whirl sample.  The Whirl still tastes good to me.  What I wondered is if I mixed a PJ dough tonight using the formulation you posted at Reply 6 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,25603.msg258178.html#msg258178 for Nate, approximately how much yeast do you think I would need to add for the dough ball to be ready for late afternoon tomorrow?  I can use ADY or IDY.  I will be using the Power Flour again as the flour.

Norma


A salesman brought a bottle of Whirl to a restaurant where I worked many years ago. I left to bottle on a shelf over the range, and it melted, spilling Whirl all over the range. It was a miracle that it didn't start a bonfire. I never understood who thought it was a good idea to put a restaurant product in a bottle that would melt at such a low temperature.
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Norma,

I have been pondering your question since you posted it. Before giving you an answer, I'd like to mention some of the obstacles I have observed when considering the use of the Whirl products to make a garlic sauce that has acceptable consistency, flavor and mouthfeel.

First, the two Whirl products are essentially all fat (oil). Nominally, based on the Nutrition Facts, a sample size is 14 grams and the Total Fat is 14 grams. That suggests 100% oil but that is only because of rounding factors. I estimate that the oil content is more like 96-97% soybean oil. By contrast, I estimate the soybean oil used to make the PJ Garlic sauce to be around 60%. Second, all of the soybean oil in the Whirl products are partially hydrogenated. But not enough to make the products thick, or at least not thick enough to use alone. You can't have the sauce drip off of the dough during baking or when eaters dip their crusts into the sauce on the side.

The three margarine products I mentioned (Blue Bonnet, Parkay and Fleischmann's) are all 65% oil margarine spreads. That means that the soybean oil is 65% of the products. Adding any one of those products to the Whirl products to make it thicker will further increase the Total Fats (and Sat Fats and Trans Fats) of the blend. As things now stand, the Whirl products by themselves, without supplementation, have about 2/3 more total fat than the PJ Garlic sauce.

The advantage of the three margarine products mentioned above is that they are in stick form and solid. If you leave a sample of any one of those products at room temperature for any appreciable time, such as overnight, in due course they will soften but show little tendency to spread (it might slump somewhat if you use an entire stick). If you do the same thing with the Parkay Squeeze product, which has 60% oil, it will spread and the liquid soybean oil will separate from the total mass.

My inclination is to try using either the Blue Bonnet stick product or the Parkay stick product. Their compositions are very similar. They also have an acidulant (phosphoric acid), which the Fleischmann's Original stick product does not.

When you go to the supermarket, you might note that there are Blue Bonnet and Parkay products that have a lower oil contents than discussed above. For example, there is a 53% Blue Bonnet margarine spread that has a composition similar to those discussed above. The ingredients for that particular product are as follows:

Blue Bonnet (53%): Vegetable Oil Blend (Liquid Soybean Oil, Partially Hydrogenated Soybean Oil), Water, Salt, Contains Less than 2% of the Following: Dried Whey, Vegetable Mono- and Diglycerides and Soy Lecithin (Emulsifiers), Potassium Sorbate and Sodium Benzoate (to Preserve Freshness), Phosphoric Acid (Acidulant), Natural and Artificial Flavor, Vitamin A Palmitate, Colored with Beta Carotene (Source of Vitamin A), Flaxseed Oil.

You will note that the 53% Blue Bonnet product contains flaxseed oil. However, it is the last ingredient in the list of ingredients so it is unlikely to be detectable in the finished product. A possible advantage of the 53% Blue Bonnet is that it might add less oil to the final blend. If there is too much oil, that might not sit well from a mouthfeel standpoint, and possibly also from a taste standpoint.

Whichever margarine stick product you decide to use, I think I would take a sample of the Whirl garlic product, for example, two ounces, and add the stick margarine product you decide to use, after letting it soften enough to handle, to the Whirl product until you feel you have the right consistency. For future reference, you will want to note how much of the margarine product you used to achieve the desired consistency, if that is, in fact, achievable. You should then taste the final blend to see if the buttery and garlic flavors are as you would like them, and also if the salt content is sufficient. Your taste test might suggest the need for some tweaking of the flavors. You should also note the mouthfeel.

If the above doesn't work to your satisfaction, and a better solution does not jump out at you from your tests, then it may be necessary to consider some other solution. But whatever that solution might be, it should be a low cost solution. Of course, with four jugs of free Whirl products, you could sustain some added costs for some time.

Peter

Peter,

Thanks for posting about some of the obstacles you have observed when considering the use of the Whirl products to make a garlic sauce that has acceptable consistency, flavor and mouthfeel.  I didn't think enough before what those problems might be.  I also didn't really know that the two Whirl products are essentially all fat.  I didn't realize either that adding one of the three margarine products you mentioned with one of the Whirl products would then increase the Total Fats more.  I guess that will be a heart attack waiting to happen.   

I can understand the advantage of the three margarine products is that they are in stick form and solid.  I know what would happen if one of those margarine products were left out.

Thanks for telling me you think I should try the Blue Bonnet stick product or the Parkay stick product.

I will note when I get to the supermarket soon about the Blue Bonnet and Parkay products that have lower oil contents. 

Thanks also for telling me how to start out the experiments.  I didn't think trying to use the Whirl products would pose so many problems in trying to create a garlic sauce.

Norma 
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline norma427

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A salesman brought a bottle of Whirl to a restaurant where I worked many years ago. I left to bottle on a shelf over the range, and it melted, spilling Whirl all over the range. It was a miracle that it didn't start a bonfire. I never understood who thought it was a good idea to put a restaurant product in a bottle that would melt at such a low temperature.

Craig,

Thanks for posting about what happened with a sample of Whirl that was at a restaurant where you worked many years ago.  I think it was a miracle it didn't start a bonfire too.  I agree with you that it isn't really a good idea to put a restaurant product in a container that would melt at such a low temperature. 

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!


 

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